Engineering technology is that part of the technological field which requires the application of scientific and engineering knowledge and methods, combined with technical skills, for the implementation and extension of existing technologies. Engineering technology education focuses on preparing engineering technologists for positions that involve product development and improvement, system development, management, manufacturing and engineering operational functions. Graduates also enter the technical sales and customer services field, or continue in graduate work in engineering or management. Placement of graduates has been excellent.

The Engineering Technology Program awards Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) degrees for each of the following degree options: Construction Engineering Technology (CET), Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology (ECET), Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET), Medical Informatics Technology (MIT), Surveying Engineering Technology (SET), and Technology Education (TEED).  The department also awards a Bachelor of Science (BS) degree in Concrete Industry Management (CIM).

The options in construction engineering technology, electrical and computer engineering technology, mechanical engineering technology and surveying engineering technology are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET (TAC of ABET) http://abet.org

Many students choose to complete their freshman and sophomore years at a community college or a technical institute, and obtain an associate's degree in applied science from these institutions. It is strongly recommended that students talk to an academic advisor at NJIT while they are still pursuing their associate's degree. The academic advisor will explain the transfer process in detail as well as suggest elective courses that may be beneficial. Contact an advisor by calling the Department of Engineering Technology at (973) 596-3228, or by email at EngineeringTechnology@njit.edu.

After being admitted to NJIT, students must meet with an academic advisor to discuss the curriculum and any special interests the student might have. Students who lack necessary courses will be assigned bridge courses to make up the required prerequisites. Generally, courses taken at the freshman and sophomore level at the community colleges cannot substitute for junior or senior NJIT engineering technology courses.

Engineering technology students are expected to meet with their faculty advisor each semester to schedule courses and review their progress in the program. The advisor must approve all courses, including electives, prior to registration.

NJIT Faculty

B

Barnes, William, Associate Professor

Brateris, Daniel J., University Lecturer

E

English, Robert, Professor Emeritus

J

Juliano, Thomas, Associate Professor

K

Khader, Michael, Associate Professor

L

Lieber, Samuel C., University Lecturer

M

Mahgoub, Mohamed A., Assistant Professor

Miima, John B., Assistant Professor

P

Potts, Laramie, Associate Professor

R

Rabie, Mohammad A., University Lecturer

Rahman, Sahidur, University Lecturer

Rockland, Ronald H., Professor

S

Sengupta, Arijit, Associate Professor

W

Washington, David W, Associate Professor

Wiggins, John, Senior University Lecturer

ENGR 101. Analytical Meth for Engr Appl. 4 credits, 6 contact hours (4.5;1.5;0).

Prerequisite:SAT Math score of 500 or above This course provides foundation in analytical methods that are used by engineers through an application-oriented, hands-on introduction to engineering analytical methods.

ENGR 210. Career Planning Seminar for En. 1 credit, 1.5 contact hour (1.5;0;0).

Prerequisite: Sophomore Standing. This course aims at providing engineering students with multidisciplinary and career planning skills in a seminar environment with emphasis on career planning, resume writing, and interview skills.

ENGR 290. Pers of the Grand Challenges. 1 credit, 1 contact hour (1;0;0).

Prerequisite: Approval of the Instructor and the Grand Challenges Program Director; sophomore or higher standing. The first step for aspiring students in becoming a grand challenges scholar. Seven engaging colloquia will be offered every fall semester. Faculty conducting research in a Grand Challenge Theme will present the colloquia with one faculty member presenting at each colloquium. At the conclusion of each faculty presentation, and in the weeks in-between the presentations, students will engage in an activity organized to focus on exploring a potential engineering solution, addressing societal impacts, and holding debates on differing perspectives.

ENGR 301. Engineering Applications of Data Science. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisites: CS 100 or CS 101 or CS 106 or CS 113 or CS 115 or BME 210. Pre or Corequisites: MATH 225 or MATH 244 or MATH 279 or MATH 305 or MATH 333 or ECE 321 or IE 331 or MNET 315. Restriction: This course is intended for engineering majors. This is a course for junior level undergraduates in any engineering discipline focusing on the use of data science techniques to solve problems in engineering. We will first discuss the Python programming language and how it can be used to access, manipulate, explore, and visualize scientific datasets. We will discuss statistics and probability as it applies to engineering problems such as safety factors and probability of part failure; this includes conditional probability, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, and Bayesian inference. We will then discuss more advanced statistical models (“machine learning”), including linear and logistic regression, decision trees, and clustering. Possible applications of these methods will be demonstrated in such disciplines and topics as (but not limited to): chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering (optimization and controls), materials engineering (structure and property databases), biomedical engineering (medical diagnosis and medical imaging) and electrical and computer engineering (signal processing, target tracking, robotic navigation). Students will gain hands-on experience in implementing and utilizing these various methods through computational laboratory assignments and reports and a semester-long engineering design project.

ENGR 310. Co-op Work Experience I. 12 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisites: ENGR 210; Completion of 36 credits; Cumulative GPA 2.5; Approval of department; Approval of CDS. Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.

ENGR 410. Co-op Work Experience II. 12 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisites: ENGR 310; Completed at least 9 credits after ENGR 310; Cumulative GPA 2.5; Approval of department; Approval of CDS. Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.

ENGR 423. Drone Science Fundamentals. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (0;0;4).

Prerequisite: NCE students with senior standing and with instructor permission. This course will cover the fundamentals of quadrotor drone kinematics and dynamics, quadrotor sensor data analysis, linear and non-linear flight control, and motion planning for a single quadrotor. Students will be guided through the process of building a quadrotor drone, setting up the required flight control parameters and associated Hardware-In-The-Loop simulators, and using Python/C programming for basic single quadrotor motion planning algorithms. Students will also be guided through the preparation for the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) Part 107 Certified Drone Pilot knowledge test.

ENGR 491. Research and Independent Study I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: Approval of the Instructor (Faculty Mentor) and the Grand Challenges Program Director Junior or higher standing. Restrictions: Junior or higher standing. Provides the student with an opportunity to work on a research project under the individual guidance of a faculty mentor associated with the Grand Challenges Scholars Program. A written report, or a research paper, or a final presentation is required for course completion.

ENGR 492. Research and Independent Study II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ENGR 491. Restrictions: Junior or higher standing, and Approval of the Instructor (Faculty Mentor) and the Grand Challenges Program Director. Provides the student with an opportunity to continue to work on a research project under the individual guidance of a faculty mentor associated with the Grand Challenges Scholars Program. Students may continue the work they started in ENGR 491 or can work on a different grand challenge with the same or different faculty mentor. A written report, or a research paper or a final presentation is required for course completion.

ENGR 493. Service Learning Experience for Engineers. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ENGR 290. Restrictions: Junior or higher standing, and Approval of the Grand Challenges Program Director. Through service experiential learning, students will engage in acquiring a multi-cultural competency. A host of opportunities are available for fulfilling this competency: an experience will require prior approval of the GCSP Faculty Advisor and the Program Director. Students will be required to develop a plan in carrying out the experience. Potential opportunities include but are not limited to 1. An Engineers without Borders project, 2. An EPICS project, 3. A global internship or cooperative education experience that is voluntary (unpaid), and 4. A study abroad experience.

ESC 310. Work Experience I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

ET 101. Introduction to Engineering Technology. 0 credits, 2 contact hours (2;0;0).

This course introduces the student to engineering technology. Also included is an introduction to the various engineering technology options: Construction, Electrical and Computer, and Mechanical Engineering Technologies as well as Concrete Industry Management.