The Humanities Department is dedicated through general university requirements, electives and various undergraduate and graduate programs of study including those culminating in bachelor's and master's degrees, to offering research opportunities, seminars and colloquia that investigate the artistic, cultural and social contexts informing contemporary society. The department’s instructional staff places special emphasis on teaching and research in the following areas: communication with particular regard to contemporary media, journalism and all forms of writing; the interplay of science, technology and society; the theatre; philosophy and professional ethics; literature; English as a second language; the study of cultural artifacts from around the globe; the visual arts, including film; and music.

NJIT Faculty

A

Arnowitz, Mark G., Director

Ascarelli, Miriam F., University Lecturer

C

Castronova, Louise, Senior University Lecturer

Cohen, Maurie, Professor

Curley, Jonathan R., Senior University Lecturer

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Donahue, Dennis P., Senior University Lecturer

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Egan, John A., University Lecturer

Esche, John N., University Lecturer

Estrada, Daniel J., University Lecturer

F

Fleischer, Doris Z., Senior University Lecturer

Funkhouser, Christopher T., Professor

H

Henry, Rolanne, Senior University Lecturer

Holbrook, J. Britt, Assistant Professor

Hunt, Theresa A., University Lecturer

J

Johnson, Carol S., Associate Professor

Jorjani, Jason, University Lecturer

K

Katz, Eric, Professor and Chair

Khichi, Narendra-Neel, University Lecturer

Kimmelman, Burt J., Professor

King, Paul, W., University Lecturer

Klobucar, Philip Andrew, Associate Professor

Kmiec, David M., University Lecturer

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Lipuma, James M., Senior University Lecturer

Longo, Bernadette C., Associate Professor

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McRae, Calista A. Assistant Professor

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O'Neill, Megan E., Assistant Professor

O'Sullivan, William, University Lecturer

P

Pardi, Nina L., Senior University Lecturer

Paris, Jerome, Director

R

Rittenhouse, Michele R., Director

Rothenberg, David B., Distinguished Professor

S

Siemann, Catherine A., University Lecturer

Steffen, Nancy L., Associate Professor

W

Waltz-Cummings, Anika E., University Lecturer

Wells, Louis A., University Lecturer

Wolf, John M., University Lecturer

Humanities Courses

COM 266. Foundations of Game Production. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. IT 201 and IT 265, all with a grade of C or better. This class introduces students to many of the tools and production methodologies needed for electron games. This class will focus heavily on content control and story handling through the use of scripting and game development tools. Students will learn a few scripting languages that are used in the games industry, such as Unreal Script and LUA and use them to create a new game experience.

COM 303. Video Narrative. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Introduces various multimedia resources and environments in order to develop new strategies for both reading and writing within a visually-based, screen-oriented culture. Students will study different historical and theoretical lineages in videography, and learn hands-on techniques and technologies to produce independent media works of their own.

COM 321. Technology & Tactics of Sound. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102, one of the following: HUM 211, 212, 213 This course provides an introduction to sound and its manifold uses and functions in the digital era. The course offers students an effective primer in the science of how sound has been measured and understood historically as a media format.

COM 325. Special Topics in Communication. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: Varies according to topic. The study of new and/or advanced topics in an area of Communication, not regularly covered in any other Humanities course at the 300-level. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

COM 335. 3-D Modeling and Animation. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. IT 201 with a grade of C or better or permission of program advisor. This class introduces students to the concepts of 3D modeling and animation, and putting those concepts into action by working with software. This class will be a hands-on, project focused course, using 3D modeling packages, taking students from design to final render.

COM 345. Character Modeling and Animation. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. COM 335 with a grade of C or better. This class builds on the concepts of 3D modeling and animation, applying those techniques to character creation and animation. This class focuses on the considerations and techniques involved in the creation and animation of character in 3D.

COM 350. Digital Video Production. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Instruction in the creation and editing of non-linear digital video; emphasis on tream production of a short film; individual editing skills with Final Cut Pro editing software; development and editing of a variety of graphic formats and digital images; formulation of a script treatment; and development of a storyboard. Topics covered include: digital multi-media production; web-casting; interactive television; data-casting;CD and DVD production.

COM 351. Documentary Studies. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This course will allow students to study the methods by which documentary work is conducted and to complete a documentary project of their own. The course will connect the qualitative methods of the social sciences and the humanistic concerns of the arts by allowing students to study documentary subjects as captured by non-fiction, photography, film, tape recorder, and the World Wide Web. Special emphasis will be placed on narrative and metaphor.

COM 352. Photojournalism. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Through hands-on writing and photography supervised by the instructor, students develop competencies in discovering and creating an interdisciplinary viewpoint using a variety of writing methods and photographic viewpoints. Special focus on interpreting architecture and architectural detail, nature's conflict and place in urban and suburban environs, and the human interface with nature and man-made spaces. Particular emphasis is placed on the creative process and critical revision.

COM 369. Digital Poetry. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An investigation of activities taken up by poets who integrate computer technology in their works. Students discuss and evaluate virtues of the dynamics presented in an array of titles that include algorithmic programming, graphical artistry, videography, holography, hypermedia, and sonic design in order to build an understanding of the combined values of these disparate forms of expression.

COM 376. Game Design Studio. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. COM 266, COM 335 and COM 345, all with a grade of C or better. This class challenges students to apply what they have learned in previous courses about game design. Students work in groups to design and create games for various platforms. Groups will work closely with the instructor to get constant feedback and criticism on their work. Students will complete case studies of various game genres. Students will work on one large project and complete it in stages, as a project would in the industry.

COM 390. Electronic Writing Workshop. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A practice-oriented workshop for creative expression in a variety of electronic formats with the specific goal of facilitating individual writing projects for screen and performance. Topics in literary theory will be combined with current criticism in electronic writing, media and screen studies to produce new cultural works in a variety of digital sub-genres, including soundscapes, hypertext poetry, animation, code poems, interactive games, digital video and wiki poems.

ENG 095. General Skills in English as a Second Language. 5 credits, 5 contact hours (5;0;0).

Intended for students in need of extensive practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in English prior to enrolling in HSS 099S.

ENG 101. College Composition I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

ENG 200. Communicating in Organizations. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Allows students to understand the need for writing in an information-based corporate culture. Students write intensively in a variety of forms for a variety of audiences. Attention is given to editing, graphic design, communications ethics, and desktop publishing. At the conclusion of the course, students prepare a portfolio of their work.

ENG 302. Communication Theory. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This course will introduce students to communication theory and practice. The course begins with a review of contemporary communication theory. After covering five selected theories--semiotic, visual, cultural, social, and reception--students will be required to apply a selected theory to a computer-mediated case study. Students will also be required to perform a collaborative field study. Through the course, students will be expected to read critically, to research peer-reviewed sources thoroughly, to present effective oral briefings, and to write analytic reports.

ENG 333. Cybertext. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Through theoretical readings and electronic research, students explore and compare information structuring in print and digital media, particularly how digital technology influences the dynamics of text. Interactivity, visual communication and developments in the realm of cybernetics are addressed in the course. Materials presented in creative, technical and commercial areas were studied.

ENG 336. Advanced Composition. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Involves composing in-depth, persuasive research essays designed to address the aims of discourse (expressive, referential, literary, and persuasive), using current media tools (text, graphics, audio, animaation and video) and venues (print and electronic), in several iterations.

ENG 339. Practical Journalism. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A descriptive and analytic survey of news systems. Assignments include practice in writing straight news items, sports writing, feature writing, science writing, interviewing, and editing?with emphasis on understanding methods. The survey of printed and broadcast news systems includes the influence of technological, economic, legal, ethical, and historical factors.

ENG 340. Oral Presentations. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Instruction and practice in effective oral presentations. Students deliver a wide range of presentations adapted to the needs of a variety of audiences. Topics include voice and diction, presentation skills, the effective use of visual aids, reporting technical mate-rial and audience analysis.

ENG 346. Journalism in American History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores how the media - defined as print as well as electronic media (television, radio and online modes of communication)have influenced different events and social movements at various points in time. Topics will include the role of William Randolph Hearst's newspapers in creating support for the Spanish-American War; press coverage of the women's suffrage movement; the role of television in ending the Vietnam war.

ENG 347. Technical, Professional and Scientific Writing for Publication. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with samples from significant technical, professional and scientific writing, sharpen skills in identifying theses and the major supporting elements in these works, while making judgments on their contributions. In addition, students will be required to demonstrate their ability to do the necessary research to integrate related sources other than the assigned texts.

ENG 348. Literary Journalism. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Students will read and analyze the works of literary journalists from the 18th century to the present day. Close reading and analytical writing as well as some journalistic writing.

ENG 349. Advanced Journalism Skills. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Through hands-on writing and reporting supervised by the instructor, students learn competencies needed in various journalistic specialties. Special focus on how to cover science and technology, social issues, culture and the arts, sports, business and consumer news. Particular emphasis on copy-editing.

ENG 350. The Newsroom. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This is an advanced journalism course. Students will work closely with the instructor in order to write news and feature stories, commentaries and critiques, and will be encouraged to publish their work in The Vector and other publications.

ENG 351. Online Journalism. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A study of how news is covered on the World Wide Web, and the impact of online news on society and politics. History of news online. Differences between print, broadcast and online-what are the strengths and weaknesses inherent to each medium? Analysis of the websites of different news organizations-from the New York Times to CNN to special interest e-zines to blogs.

ENG 352. Technical Writing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An advanced writing course. Combines current theory with actual practice to prepare students as technical writers. Analyze complex communication situations and design appropriate responses through tasks that involve problem solving, rhetorical theory, document design, oral presentations, writing teams, audience awareness, ethical considerations, and gender equity issues.

ENG 353. Composing Documents for Print. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores information structuring via print and digital media; how computer technology has influenced the ways in which information is presented in modern culture. Focuses on the optimal ways to prepare and present information for technical and commercial use. Important concepts such as visual literacy and effective design are discussed and addressed.

ENG 354. Composing Documents for the Web. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Seminar and laboratory-based course designed for BA/BS majors; open to others with appropriate backgrounds and interests and permission of instructor. Follow up of ENG 353, explores information structuring via digital media, and how computer technology has influenced the ways in which information is presented in contemporary culture. Through guided interactive research, presents information for technical, commercial, and artistic use. Projects involve use of HTML editors, NJIT networks, and graphical and animation software.

ENG 355. Television News Writing and Production. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (3;1;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This course consists of lectures and hands-on practice with the basics of television news writing and production and a field trip to a television station. After learning the fundamentals, the class will then begin its own news production by refining the video taped "packages" and integrating them into a studio newscast they will write and produce while guided by the instructor and with technical support from the staff of Instructional Technology and Media Services. The semester culminates in a final program that can be delivered to the campus community through ITMS's cable network.

ENG 364. Theory of Rhetoric. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines theories of rhetoric from ancient to contemporary times. Special attention is paid to Aristotle, Peter Ramus, James Kinneavy, Walter Ong, and -Jurgen Habermas. Focuses on the ways in which theories inform the practice of communication. In the course project, students design and conduct field research based on rhetorical theory.

ENG 369. Creative Writing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Focuses on the complexities of creating literary texts. Analyzes student writing in genres such as fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and drama. Considers these genres from theoretical perspectives. Topics include character development, plot, dia-logue; meter, rhyme, figurative language; audience analysis, ethos, and narrative theory. Students write, edit and critique their own work with the aim of publication.

ENG 490. Co-op Work Experience I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments are facilitated and approved by the co-op office. Requires mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

ENG 491. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments are facilitated and approved by the co-op office. Requires mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

ENG 496. Senior Project-Communication and Media. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Intended for Communication and Media majors only. For professional and technical communication majors only. Provides students with a capstone experience. Offers PTC students the opportunity to enhance their understanding of communication through their integration of skills and knowledge gained in prior courses. The resultant research thesis or field project, of substantial length and originality, represents the culmination of the undergraduate disciplinary experience. Utilizing both a seminar and workshop approach, entails intense and sustained collaboration between student and instructor, and cooperation among students.

HSS 403. Humanities Senior Seminar - Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students are required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 404. Humanities Senior Seminar - History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Completion of either the LIT/HIST/PHIL/STS or Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students are required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 405. Humanities Senior Seminar - Philosophy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better; completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students will be required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 406. Humanities Senior Seminar - English. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better; completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students will be required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 407. Humanities Senior Seminar - Theater. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better; completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students will be required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 408. Humanities Senior Seminar - Science, Technology, and Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better; completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students will be required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 409. Humanities Senior Seminar - Social Science. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Basic Social Sciences (6 credits) and either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS (3 credits) or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science (3 credits). The remaining 300-level course may be taken as a co-requisite of the seminar. The capstone seminars allow students the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in a specific area of the instructor's expertise. Students will be required to bring together interests and skills developed in previous courses. Students make in-depth oral and written presentations. A list of capstone seminars is published each semester in the course registration bulletin.

HSS 491. Honors Sem In Humanities. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better; completion of either the Lit/Hist/Phil/STS or the Open Elective in Humanities and Social Science, with a grade of C or better. The subjects are announced at the time of registration. Each seminar is limited to 16 students. These courses satisfy the Capstone Seminar in Humanities and Social Science Electives GUR for students enrolled in the honors college only.

HUM 099. English Composition: Reading, Writing, Speaking I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Focuses on developing the reading and writing skills necessary for success in a college curriculum. Emphasizes structuring and organizing effective sentences and paragraphs; drafting and revising; preparing summaries; building vocabulary; developing grammatical fluency; formulating a thesis, and other steps toward writing expository essays. Mandatory writing workshops are held in conjunction with the course work.

HUM 099S. English Composition: Reading, Writing, Speaking I. 6 credits, 6 contact hours (6;0;0).

Prerequisites: None, unless placement test result requires ENG 095. The first course of the two-semester composition sequence HUM 099S-HUM 100-SL. Intended for students whom English is a second language. Emphasizes reading strategies, building vocabulary, grammar, developing a thesis, organizing an essay, editing and writing different kinds of expository essays. Frequent oral presentations. Weekly writing labs are held in conjunction with the course work.

HUM 100. English Composition: Reading, Writing, Speaking II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

HUM 101. English Composition: Writing, Speaking, Thinking I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Entrance is determined by placement test score or completion of HUM 099 with a grade of C or better. Focuses on developing written and oral communication skills; emphasizes writing expository and research essays; preparing oral reports; drafting, revising, editing; evaluation and proper documentation of source material; using rhetorical strategies such as narration and argument.

HUM 102. English Composition: Writing, Speaking, Thinking II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C or better. Focuses on enhanced written and oral communication skills; emphasizes reading and interpretation of literary forms; critical analysis; methods of research using print and on-line sources; report writing and writing about literature.

HUM 2**. Humanities Elective. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

HUM 211. The Pre-Modern World. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101 and HUM 102 with a grade of C or better. Case studies focus on differing forms of material culture, belief systems, aesthetic norms, and artistic productions to develop an understanding of ancient and medieval world views. This course satisfies three credits of the GUR in Cultural History.

HUM 212. The Modern World. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101 and HUM 102 with a grade of C or better. Uses case studies to examine such key processes as the expansion of global trade and the formation of a global economy, European perceptions of non-Western cultures, and the roots and legacy of imperialism. This course satisfies 3 credits of the Cultural History GUR. Honors Note: See HUM 101.

HUM 251. Ethical Issues in Business. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C or better. An examination of the ethical problems and moral foundations of business from the perspective of moral philosophy. Among the questions explored are: What are the rights of employees and employers in the workplace? Do corporations and managers have an obligation to society at large? What is the relationship between personal and business morality? Is there a moral justification for the free market?.

HUM 325. Humanities Special Topics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: Varies according to topic. The study of new and/or advanced topics in an area of the humanities, not regularly covered in any other HUM, LIT, ENG OR HSS course at the 300-level. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course. A student may register for no more than two semesters of special topics courses.

HUM 401. Independent Study. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

LIT 320. American Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A survey of major works of American literature. Provides a foundation for understanding the currents of American thought and experiences. Special emphasis is paid to American literature within a global context.

LIT 321. British Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A survey of the major works of British literature. Provides a foundation for understanding the currents of British thought and experience. Special emphasis is paid to British literature within a global context.

LIT 330. World Literature I: North America, Latin America and the Caribbean, Australia and Oceania. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Enhances understanding of other cultures and of past and contemporary global interactions.

LIT 331. World Literature II: Africa and the Middle East, Asia, and Europe. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Enhances the under-standing of other cultures and of past and contemporary global interactions.

LIT 340. Contemporary Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Focuses on the study of literary works published within the last ten years. Considers how contemporary issues and problems are addressed in a variety of literary works.

LIT 350. Fiction. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores the short story and the novel from varied countries and eras. Emphasis is given to narrative methods, representative themes, and global perspectives.

LIT 352. 20th Century European Fiction. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines themes ranging from war and occupation, revolution, Fascism, and Communism to individual liberation and self-discovery, existen-tialism, absurdism, and feminism.

LIT 355. Poetry. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores the problems, devices, and techniques of poetry'sound, rhythm, meter; diction and tone; connotation, metaphor, and symbol?as a means of demystifying the reading of poems. Emphasis is given to the place and purpose of poetry in a technological society.

LIT 360. Drama. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Follows the development of play structure from folkloric origins to contemporary theater. Emphasis is on text, history of text development, and the changing purpose of theatrical presentations.

LIT 361. 20th Century American Drama. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines the development of 20th century American drama with emphasis on the ways, often experimental, in which the playwrights reflect the spirit of the times.

LIT 362. Non-Western Drama. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores clas-sical and contemporary theater and drama in China, Japan, India, Africa, and the Middle East.

LIT 363. Ethnic and Minority Drama. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Using con-tem-porary dramas as social, historical, and cultural artifacts, examines the experience of Latinos, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and African Americans.

LIT 364. Modern Continental and British Drama. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An examination of some of the dramas from the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries with the purpose of gaining some understanding of how dramatists, in both subject matter and technique, reflect the spirit of the times. Representative playwrights include Ibsen, Shaw, Wilde, Strindberg, Synge, Chekhov, O'Casey, Pirandello, Anouilh, Brecht, Ionesco, and Pinter.

LIT 365. Non-Fiction. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines the ways that writers examine cultural issues through the use of literary non-fiction. Emphasis is placed on autobiographical, persuasive, and narrative techniques.

LIT 370. Literature and Diversity. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Allows students to explore the literature of human difference, including the literature of cross-cultural experience and sexual difference.

LIT 372. African-American Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Allows students to explore themes and styles particular to literary works by and about African-Americans.

LIT 374. Women and Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Allows students to explore literature by and about women from around the world. Special attention is paid to autobiographical narratives.

LIT 376. Latin American Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines the ways that writers of Latin America and the Caribbean explore their respective culture through techniques such as dream, myth, and legend to achieve an authentic and unique -vision. Special emphasis is given to 20th-century authors.

LIT 378. Literature and Nature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Literature as it reveals and interprets the natural world. Examines the ways that nature has been used in fiction, drama, poetry, and non-fiction. Students learn to describe the natural world in their writing. Co-listed as STS 378.

LIT 380. Historical Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Sources of fiction and drama are often based on historical personalities and actual incidents. Examines a number of such works. Original historical material is compared with the literary work it inspired, thus providing insights into the nature of the creative process and the purposes of the historian and the creative writer.

LIT 382. The Comic Tradition in English and American Literature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Presents great comic works from the 14th century to the present. Students study verse narratives, plays, novels, and essays. Emphasis is given to the classical roots and international connections of the comic tradition in English, the relationship between form and function in comedy, and elucidation of comedy's social and philosophical ends.

LIT 384. Musical Theater Adaptations. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or betterThe content of this course is primarily literary. It examines the original texts that are used for theatrical adaptations in contemporary Broadway and Off-Broadway musicals. The origin stories are drawn from literature, graphic novels, and cultural folk stories. Students will attend selected musicals.

LIT 386. Science Fiction. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Explores the distinctive characteristics of science fiction as a literary genre and its function as a social criticism. Special attention is given to the ways in which cultural gender coding surfaces in the text. Films and video are used.

LIT 388. The Russian Novel and Short Story. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Focuses on Russian fiction of the 19th and 20th centuries. Approaches material both as evidence of artistic vision and as social documents of Russian history.

PHIL 300. Philosophy of Law and Social Justice. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Introduction to philosophical issues concerning law, using lectures and case studies. Topics covered will include: the interpretation of legal texts; the foundation of moral obligation to obey the law; the nature of rights; and the function of punishment.

PHIL 331. Problems in Philosophy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An examination of problems of a social, ethical, esthetic, religious, and scientific nature, and a study of the related principles and methods of philosophy. Readings are chosen from a wide range of periods and schools from the Greeks to the present, with some application of philosophical analysis to individual and societal problems.

PHIL 333. Moral Philosophy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A critical discussion of the history and fundamental elements of ethical thought. Examines topics such as the basic ethical theories, the nature of right and wrong, the significance of moral choice, the structure of the moral life, and the place of reason in ethics. Readings from both classical and modern philosophers.

PHIL 334. Engineering Ethics and Technological Practice: Philosophical Perspectives on Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A philosophical examination of the nature of engineering practice and applied technology. Considers such questions as: How do the societal functions of engineers and the practical application of technologies relate to basic moral and intellectual values? What moral obligations are implied by the uses of technology? What are the ethical duties of engineers in the practice of their careers? How are technological practice and engineering related to questions about knowledge and reality?.

PHIL 337. World Religions. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An introduction to five world religions which make strong claims to be in some sense universal: Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, with special attention to their impact on contemporary politics, gender, economics, and culture. Study of selected scriptures, major customs, representative figures, and one or two works of art from each religious tradition.

PHIL 340. Ethical Issues in Public Policy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Course premise is the inevitability of ethical issues in public policy decision making. Societal forces such as government, industry, economics, public interest, and science can play various roles in shaping public policy and are related to ethical concerns. Focuses on both historic and current public policy case studies.

PHIL 350. Representative Philosophies. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. The ideas of a few great thinkers, from a variety of historical periods. Shows at first hand how these philosophers accelerated intellectual progress and how their work may contribute to the solution of modern problems.

PHIL 351. Biomedical Ethics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An examination of the ethical problems and moral foundations of medicine. Among the issues explored are the changing nature of the doctor/patient relationship, increased patient autonomy, advance directives, the rationing of care, doctor-assisted suicide, and "the right to die." Honors Note: See HSS 101.

PHIL 355. The Philosophy of Science. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An investigation into the foundations and implications of modern science, with special emphasis on the influence of philosophy on scientific thought, and on philosophic questions.

PHIL 380. Philosophy of Language. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines tradition, formation and change in the ways that language shapes thought. Special attention is paid to the relationships between language and religion, as well as language and science.

STS 100. Social Science and CSLA Research. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course introduces the content and methodologies of CSLA disciplines, provides examples of research problems through the lens of the social sciences and gives students an understanding of each major and an overview of the social, historical, and ethical influences on contemporary sciences, and the changing relationships among science, technology and culture. Each week CSLA researchers lecture on applied approaches to problem solving in their domains.

STS 101. Foundations of Science, Technology and Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: None. This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary study of science, technology and society. Through a combination of lectures by the STS teaching staff and external speakers, as well as classic and contemporary readings and case studies that exemplify the field's core content, students examine the social, aesthetic, environmental, economic and political constructs that contextualize the development and proliferation of mechanical and digital technologies with which we interact.

STS 2**. Science Tech and Society Elect. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

STS 201. Understanding Technological Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

A problem-centered and task-oriented course that integrates social science theory and practice into the leading public issues of a technological society. Students learn critical thinking through hands-on assignments. The course emphasizes student understanding of social institutions that directly affect technological development and professional careers.

STS 205. Intro to Research Methods. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 102. This course is intended to give second year undergraduate students an understanding of what research is, what it is used for, how it is conducted, and how it is reported. It provides an overview of applying the scientific method to real-life research, including ethical concerns, qualitative and quantitative methods (and how and when they should be used), and how to critically evaluate published research findings.

STS 210. General Psychology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 with a grade of C or better. Introduction to the study of human behavior. Topics include motivation, perception, learning, cognitive development, personality and emotion, individual difference, and biological basis of behavior, as well as methodology in psychological research.

STS 221. Sociology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

An examination of modern society and culture, analyzing the forces for stability and change. Topics covered include the individual and society (socialization, conformity, alienation, and class structure), social institutions (religion, law, education, family, state), social processes (conflicts and harmony, cohesion and dissolution, power, authority, and revolution), urbanization, industrialization, and technological change.

STS 257. Technology, Society and Culture: An American View. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: None. This course will examine several key cases in the way technology fits into society. The politics, sociology, and ethics of technological development will be investigated. Topics include several significant advances of the twentieth century: nuclear warfare, fast food, the simplicity movement, and futuristic enhancement. What do all these things have to do with one another?.

STS 258. Technology, Society and Culture: A Global View. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: None. This course will investigate the issues and problems inherent in the globalization of technology and culture at the beginning of this new millennium. Countries and economies are becoming more entwined in each others identities and economies, and cultural diversity is both threatened and proliferating at one and the same time. How much can the world's markets continue to grow and connect? How does the spread of information change what we know about one another? Should we be afraid of progress? Does the world understand the United States? Do we understand the world? How can "Growth" or "development" be sustained? How can we guide its change?.

STS 300. Legal Reasoning, Writing, and Technology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101. Integrates the process of legal research and fundamentals of legal writing with analysis of law. Focuses upon legal reasoning through analysis of fact and upon the logic of law in judicial opinions, statutory construction, and constitutional interpretation as contemporary issues are analyzed.

STS 301. Independent Study. 1 credit, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. Consists of self-paced study on an individual or small group basis in a specific area integral to a student's STS concentration but not available on a regular course basis.

STS 302. Independent Study. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. See STS 301.

STS 303. Independent Study. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. See STS 301.

STS 304. Writing about Science, Technology and Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Develop abilities to write lucidly and speak forcefully about the interrelationship of science, technology and society. Learn to articulate a sense of purpose in order to choose the appropriate methods for reporting issues in a technological society. Effective development and transfer of technical knowledge in a complex world.

STS 306. American Mosaic: Understanding Cultural Diversity. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of multiculturalism in the United States. The course provides students with a methodological framework for understanding cultural diversity in the United States and around the world.

STS 307. Fundamentals of Research in STS. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Focuses on research methods in the field of science, technology and society. Focuses on the following methods: problem statement and hypothesis formulation; research design in science, technology and society; data sources; and data acquisition and analysis.

STS 308. Technology and Global Development: Introduction to STS. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Introduces the important public issues that technology brings to the modern world, such as energy development and environmental pollution. Emphasizes the close connections between science and technology, social institutions, and cultural values. Also analyzes today's "global village", the changing relations between East and West and the Third World, and worldwide development and environmental issues.

STS 309. Advocacy and the Law. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ENG 300, SS 300 both with a grade of C or better. Offers opportunities to explore the retrieval and use of legal and law-related materials while developing skills in oral advocacy and in writing persuasive legal documents, such as motion memoranda and briefs. Includes learning to listen to participants in the legal process as well as developing effective styles and forms of speech in the classroom.

STS 310. Technology and Human Values. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Examines the interactions between science, technology and human values. Specifically, explores psychological, moral, and philosophical consequences of, and humanistic responses to, technological change. Readings, essays, fiction, and research articles treat such topics as the philosophical foundations of modern science, scientism, technicism; the impact of technology on images of man found in modern literature; and the moral implications of various kinds of recent technology.

STS 311. Co-op Work Experience I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: completion of the sophomore year, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated and approved by the Co-op Office. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a -report. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

STS 312. Technology and Policy in Contemporary America. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. A study of technology and politics in recent America. Focuses on the role of the federal government in shaping technology, especially through funding technological innovations and applications. Topics will include the origins of technology policy in World War II, the influence of the Cold War, the science and technology policy advisory system, and political and cultural influences on technology policy.

STS 313. Environmental History and Policy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Covers the rise of the modern environmental debate, and examines its current priorities and values, politics and economics, and impacts on industry and society. Students review the role of regulatory agencies, private industry, public interest groups, and the media. Current major issues in New Jersey are considered, as well as environmental debate on a national and global level.

STS 316. Mass Communications, Technology and Culture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Uses the tools of the humanities and social sciences to study the interplay between technology and mass culture. Focuses on motion pictures, electronic music, and television as both technologies and as forms of art. Devotes special attention to the portrayal of science and technology in the media.

STS 318. Educational Media Design. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: IT 201. Educational Media Design employs the instructional principles of constructivist pedagogy as the process used to develop a solution to develope courseware for K-12 audience. The course builds on the participatory design model of software engineering in order to develop integrated learning environments that support visual and verbal literacy; enables student to be able to plan, organize, and systematically develop instructional materials. This course implements instructional design theory and pedagogy in order to create an actual application for a computer-based environment. Same as IT 380.

STS 320. Global Evolution of Scientific Thought I: Case Studies from Antiquity through the 19th Century. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Traces the global development of scientific ways of thinking and demonstrates how scientific ideas, methods, and theories both reflect and influence thought in other areas. Special emphasis is on the biographical approach to scientific innovation through analysis of key figures in relation to the societies in which they lived. Attention is paid to the roles of class and gender in scientific practice. Begins with the study of science in the ancient nations of Babylonia, China, and India and ends with an examination of the rise of scientific approaches to social problems in the nineteenth century.

STS 324. Topics In Sci Tech & Soc. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

STS 325. ST:. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An in-depth examination of a current STS issue. A new topic is addressed each time the course is offered.

STS 330. The Professional Engineer: History and Context. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of the origins of modern engineering and the context in which engineering has developed. The course includes an analysis of the contemporary engineering culture?its structure and the values which drive it. The student will be expected to confront both the constraints and opportunities presented by the professional world of engineering.

STS 339. Philosophy and Psychology of Race and Gender. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210, each with a grade of C or better. Course examines the psychological elements of prejudice, with emphasis on racial cognition and gender bias. Topics covered include the history of essentialism about race and gender; implicit bias; stereotype threat; interventions against biased attitudes; and ethics of race and gender bias. Readings from contemporary philosophy and psychology.

STS 340. Multiculturalism in a Technological Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Explores the roles of culture and ethnicity in our increasingly technological and global society. The interplay between scientific developments and the specific sociocultural contexts is addressed. Specific case studies from various countries are explored, covering differing levels of technological achievement. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to competently analyze the interaction between a country's scientific development and its political and sociological climate. Special topics are negotiated with students at the start of each class, with the goal of covering all continents and a variety of scientific fields. At least one case study each semester carefully reviews multiculturalism in the American technological culture. Emphasis also is given to the particular roles and responsibilities of the United States as a technological and political leader.

STS 342. Women in Technological Culture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Takes an interdisciplinary and multicultural approach to issues of gender in science and technology. The issues include the current status and problems of women in non-traditional professions; the historical contributions of women in science and technology; images of women in Western and non-Western cultures; theories of gender difference, past and present; the impact of cultural gender coding on the epistemologies of science and technology; women and Third World development. Course materials include case studies and autobiographical narratives, films, and science fiction as well as historical and sociological analyses. Expressive student writing and group projects are encouraged.

STS 344. Communications Policy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Study of communication environments and developing communications technologies as central elements of evolving political and social systems. Analysis of philosophical, military, economic, and technical premises for communications policy and the process of regulation.

STS 346. Pragmatism and Technology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Examines the relationship between the American philosophy of pragmatism and the role of technology in the contemporary world. How do philosophical ideas affect the development of technology and science? How has pragmatism shaped the current view of the meaning and value of technological progress? Readings from both the traditional authors of American pragmatism?Peirce, James, and Dewey?and contemporary texts.

STS 347. Introduction to Music. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C or better. This course is an introduction to the history of music, from ancient to present times, Western, Eastern, folk, world, classical, jazz, rock, and electronic. The class aims to develop in the student an informed and critical ear to make sense of the vast array of music available to our ears today. We also cover how technology has transformed how we experience and create music, from the development of the piano to the computer. The course involves extensive music listening and writing about music. It is a prerequisite for the hands-on electronic music classes that NJIT offeres, STS 349 and STS 325.

STS 348. Esthetics and Modern Technology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. The central focus of this course is on the changing conception of beauty as influenced by technological development, especially in twentieth-century United States society. The course examines how technology is echoed in art and philosophy, and how they, in turn, influence future technological considerations.

STS 349. Advanced Music Technology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: STS 347. Students will learn the basics of notebook computer-based music composition and production. Emphasis will be on composition and making of music, learning the aesthetics necessary to get the most out of your machine. Course will require extensive work on your own home computer. Computer requirements: A PC or Macintosh system running Ableton Live.

STS 350. Computers and Society. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, one SS course, completion of a 100-level GUR course in CS, all with a grade of C or better. Examines the historical evolution of computer and information systems and explores their implications in the home, business, government, medicine, and education. Topics include auto-mation and job impact, privacy, and legal and ethical issues.

STS 351. Minds and Machines. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210, each with a grade of C or better. An introduction to the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Topics covered include the computational theory of mind; artificial intelligence; connectionism; embodied theory of mind; and dynamical theories of mind. Readings from recent and contemporary philosophy, psychology and computer science.

STS 352. Race and Ethnicity. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, EPS 202, ECON 201 or their equivalents. Explores the concepts of race and ethnicity in both national and international arenas. Scientific, sociological, political, and global implications are addressed. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to competently address the impact of race on micro and macro levels, from both individual and policy perspectives. Special topics are negotiated with students at the start of each class. Such topics can include immigration, affirmative action, educational curricula, institutional racism, or the impact of multiculturalism on families. Emphasis is on the interaction between race and technology.

STS 358. Moral Psychology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210 each with a grade of C or better. An introduction to moral philosophy with emphasis on the biological and psychological mechanisms underlying moral thought, judgment an action. Topics covered include altruism and egoism; utilitarianism, deontology and virtue ethics; the situationist critique of character; and agency and responsibility. Readings draw from classical and contemporary philosophers as well as from current empirical psychology.

STS 359. Cyberpsychology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 with a grade of C or better and STS 201 or STS 210 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Introduction to the study of the effects of the internet and cyberspace on the psychology of individuals and groups. Some topics covered include: online identity, online relationships, personality types in cyberspace, transference to computers, addiction to computers and the internet, regressive behavior in cyberspace, online gender-switching, etc.

STS 360. Ethics and the Environment. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. An analysis of the ethical presuppositions and value principles underlying environmental policy. The study of ethical theories and their application to the environmental crisis.

STS 362. Environmental Economics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, EPS 202, ECON 201 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Presents a detailed overview of the relationship between political economy and the environment. Draws on diverse case studies including global warming, harvesting of minerals on the ocean's floor, destruction of old growth forests, and contamination of the -nation's water, air, and soils. Explores the economic remedies to the fast-changing relationship between society and nature.

STS 363. Introduction to Sustainability Studies. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: STS 201 and EPS 202, each with a grade of C or better. The course introduces students to sustainability studies, examines the roots of the concept, and explores its roles as feature of international politics. Particular attention is devoted to the economically, advanced nations and the challenges of planning for a more sustainable future. The course also considers how the sustainability agenda is likely to evolve in an era of climate change and biophysical constraints.

STS 364. Sustainability Policy and Practice. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: STS 201, EPS 202 and STS 363, each with a grade of C or better. Formulation of effective sustainability policies requires appreciation of the linkages between conceptual understanding and empirical practice. The course highlights the macroeconomic drivers of contemporary sustainability challenges. Topics discussed include efficiency improvements, economic relocalization, green consumerism, and efforts to build a green economy.

STS 378. Literature and Nature. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Literature reveals and interprets the natural world. Students examine the ways that nature has been used in non-fiction and fiction. Students also learn the challenge of describing the natural world in their own words. Representative writers include Percy Shelley, Henry David Thoreau, Octavio Paz, Denise Levertov, Gary Snyder, Joyce Carol Oates, and Annie Dillard. Co-listed as LIT 378.

STS 380. Policy Issues in the Coastal Environment. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of coastal environments from the standpoint of the scientist, the engineer, and the resource manager. Topics include beach and shoreline characteristics, technological innovations to address coastal erosion problems, and current debates in coastal policy and resource management. Case studies are used to illustrate coastal management practices and the scientific, technical, and social constraint to policy formulation.

STS 381. Field Techniques and Research Methods. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An introduction to research methods. The objectives of the course are to provide opportunity to pursue specialized, in-depth research in a subfield of science, technology and society of the student's choice; to develop skills in problem identification, research design and problem solving; to increase familiarity with methods of data analysis; to strengthen library research skills; to provide an opportunity to gather original field data in a team-oriented environment; and to improve oral and written communication skills.

STS 382. Geographical Perspectives on the Environment. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Designed to introduce students to the field of geography. Focuses on the natural processes that sculpt the physical and biological terrain, and the environmental interrelationships between human societies and nature. Combining physical, human and environmental perspectives on the earth's surface, explores, in depth, topics such as famine, societal response to natural and technological hazards, and water issues in the United States.

STS 401. Independent Study. 1 credit, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

STS 403. Independent Study. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

STS 411. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: STS 311 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and/or project. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

STS 490. Project and Seminar I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: senior standing in the STS program. Each student undertakes a comprehensive study of an issue in science technology and human affairs. The solution requires application of knowledge and skills acquired in course work, self-study, and library research as well as consultation with persons in the academic community, industry, and government. The completed study is submitted as a detailed written report. The seminar meets weekly. Speakers from education, government, and industry address themselves in topics of current interest to STS students.

STS 491. Project and Seminar II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: STS 490. A continuation of STS 490.

THTR 101. Living Theatre. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

An introduction to the basic elements of theater through an examination of the roles of the playwright, director, designer, and actor. Attend select current plays and professional productions.

THTR 102. Acting Fundamentals. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Developing acting skills in a studio environment. Work with improvisation comedy and drama, scene study based on known contemporary and classical plays, and basic theater exercises that develop physical skills for character development and performance endurance. Emphasis on vocal skills using presentation exercises and theatrical audition techniques will be developed through the class.

THTR 208. Movement for Theatre. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102, and Cultural History (select from HUM 211, HUM 212 or HIST 213). Introduces skill-oriented movement exercises through an exploration of the physical nature of acting and character work. Movement is basic to actor training. The movement exercises used in this course will explore not only the physical age of the characters from plays chosen in class, but also work with the character social movements basedon the cultural history of the times the plays were written or the historical period they represent.

THTR 209. Voice and Speech for Theatre I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102, and Cultural History (select from HUM 211, HUM 212 or HIST 213). The objective of the course is for students to learn to use voice as a vocal instrument. Beginning with breath control, students learn how to project the voice, the use of resonators, and the placement of the voice in space. This is an essential training for the actor or public speaker. Exercises will be generated from plays from around the world. The character work from these plays will include the study of dialects, sustainability, phonetics, and culturally specific vocals.

THTR 210. Voice & Speech for Theater II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Working with plays, poetry, and narratives, students learn to analyze texts vocally and to explore the relationship between physical and vocal expression.

THTR 212. From Page to Stage. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The course is an introduction to understanding the relationship between the literary nature of plays and how they are produced for the stage. Attendance to current professional productions and on-campus productions will be used as a launching point for class papers, discussions, and exercises.

THTR 213. Directing I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102, and Cultural History (select from HUM 211, HUM 212, or HIST 213). Students will learn major directoral techniques in the production of short plays and other workshop scenarios. There is an emphasis on the process of synthesizing theatrical elements of direction in order to oversee and orchestrate the mounting of a theater production. The goal of the course is for students to learn what directors do to ensure the quality and completeness of theater production by collaborating with a team of individuals involved in stagecraft, costume design, props, lighting design, acting, set design, stage combat, and sound design for the production.

THTR 215. Acting II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: THTR 102 or permission of instructor. Advanced scene study, audition techniques, and ensemble techniques are explored. Interpretation of scenes from selected dramas for stage performance, evaluation of practiced techniques in character portrayal through dialogue and action. Participation in a performance workshop is stressed.

THTR 216. Improvisational Theatre Short Form. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and Cultural History (select from HUM 211, HUM 212 or HIST 213). THTR 216 introduces the techniques of short-form improvisational performance through in-class practical exercises that promote spontaneity and creative space work. Students work with game structure and short narratives leading to public performances so the student gains insights only the live setting can impart.

THTR 217. Improvisational Theatre Long Form. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and cultural History (select from HUM 211, HUM 212 or HIST 213). This course includes exercises that promote long-form interactive narrative and story development skills. In addition to exploring storytelling this technique is used in other media such as, music, movement, and film. The students will perform multiple times getting feedback only a live show can give.

THTR 220. Instr Ensemble Performance I. 1 credit, 3 contact hours (0;3;0).

Prerequistes: permission of course coordinator and conductor This course involves membership in an instrumental music group led by a professional conductor. The group will meet once a week to rehearse concert pieces. Students must play an instrument with a significant level of accomplishment in order to register for this course. There will be continuous assessment of individual performance by the conductor and a final concert in a campus venue. This is one of three performance courses. Musicians may join one or more of these ensembles, wind, string, jazz, etc. In order to register for this course, contact instructor for permission.

THTR 221. Instr Ensemble Performance II. 1 credit, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequistes: permission of course coordinator and conductor This course involves membership in an instrumental music group led by a professional conductor. The group will meet once a week to rehearse concert pieces. Students must play an instrument with a significant level of accomplishment in order to register for this course. There will be continuous assessment of individual performance by the conductor and a final concert in a campus venue. This is one of three performance courses. Musicians may join one or more of these ensembles, wind, string, jazz, etc. In order to register for this course, contact instructor for permission.

THTR 222. Instr Ensemble Performance III. 1 credit, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequistes: permission of course coordinator and conductor This course involves membership in an instrumental music group led by a professional conductor. The group will meet once a week to rehearse concert pieces. Students must play an instrument with a significant level of accomplishment in order to register for this course. There will be continuous assessment of individual performance by the conductor and a final concert in a campus venue. This is one of three performance courses. Musicians may join one or more of these ensembles, wind, string, jazz, etc. In order to register for this course, contact instructor for permission.

THTR 261. Performance I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Departmental approval required. A lecture/workshop that combines class with a play production. An in-depth study of the author of the play and contemporaries of his/her time will be made throughout the semester. A different style or genre of theater is studied each term the course is offered based on the chosen mainstage production.

THTR 262. Performance II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Departmental approval required. A study will be made of the chosen playwright, contemporaries of the writer, and an in-depth study of costume design, music of period, and set design of the play chosen for production. A production team will coordinate the main stage production.

THTR 310. Theatre History I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Study of Euro-American theater history from Greece and Rome through early post-Renaissance Europe. The course covers the dramatic literature of the times and how the socioeconomic influences reflect the theatrical style, community interaction, and the technical uses of stage devices.

THTR 315. Theatre History II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Study of Euro-American theatre history from post-Renaissance Europe to present. Dramatic literature will be related to the historical events that reflect theatrical style, political movements, and technical advancements in society.

THTR 344. American Musical Theater. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Course covers the development of American Musical Theatre decade by decade, starting with the turn of the 20th century until the present day. Examples of music and lyrics are demonstrated in class and students attend contemporary and revival Broadway musicals.

THTR 365. Principles of Playwriting. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. The course objective is to write and rewrite three short plays during the semester. These new plays will have a first reading and a staged reading in the classroom, followed by analytical discussions about playwriting and the craft's applied techniques. Students will attend two professional plays and write subsequently one experience paper and one research paper; attend both campus shows for discussion and in-class improvisational playwriting exercies. The original plays developed in class will be submitted by the student for playwriting competitions at the end of the semester.

THTR 396. Internship-Theater. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Open to junior or senior Theater majors or minors or Communication majors with Theater Specialization. Permission of division director or faculty advisor in conjunction with the instructor directing the course. The internship is with a professional performing or media arts organization. The student is expected to work with the host company for professional experience.

THTR 411. Special Topics in Theatre. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This specialty course will feature a different aspect of theater each semester depending on the area of expertise of the instructor. Some examples: The course could cover playwriting, advanced playwriting, film writing, and musical theater techniques, advanced theater directing, auditioning skills, advanced acting or acting: history and practice.

THTR 414. Directing II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: THTR 213 or departmental approval. Assistant directing main stage production with faculty director or other independent directing project. Intense study of directing style through practice and research.

THTR 465. Performance II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: THTR 261 or THTR 262 and HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. This is an advanced study of one playwright's work leading to a performance of one of his/her plays. A study will be made of the chosen playwright, contemporaries of the writer, and an in depth study of costume design, music of period, and set design of the play chosen for production.

THTR 483. Independent Study in Theater I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

By arrangement only through a theater faculty advisor, the student will take on a specialized creative theater project for the semester. This would cover a specific aspect of theatrical production development and cumulate in one of the following depending on the nature of the assignment: a journal or portfolio of completed production work, an original play or screenplay script, or research document.

THTR 484. Independent Study in Theater II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

This course is for junior and seniors only by arrangement through a theater faculty advisor. The student will take on a more advanced specialized creative theater project for the semester. AS this would cover a specific aspect of theatrical production development, the student will be expected to take on a leadership role in the chosen area of study. Documentation of the project development and completion is required.