The degree programs and research efforts at NJIT’s School of Management (SOM) are directed toward understanding the effects of technology and technological change on business. SOM’s goal is to prepare a new generation of technology-savvy business leaders who are ready for the challenges of the continuing technological revolution.

SOM is committed to providing a solid foundation in business and management within a hands-on, experiential learning environment. Small class sizes and opportunities to co-op or intern with major corporations throughout the region and to work with startup companies in NJIT’s small business incubator allow students to learn first-hand about entrepreneurship and product innovation. Currently, there are over 700 students enrolled in the school’s undergraduate and graduate programs.  In addition, almost 200 students majoring in engineering, computing, social science, and the applied and design sciences are pursuing a business minor.  Joint B.S./M.S. or B.S./M.B.A. options allow students in several departments across the university to accelerate their studies and earn a master’s degree in management or an M.B.A. in addition to their undergraduate degree.

SOM offers an undergraduate program leading to the B.S. degree in Business with concentrations in accounting, finance, innovation and entrepreneurship, international business, management information systems, and marketing.  At the graduate level, SOM offers three programs leading to M.S. degrees in management (M.S.M.) with a variety of concentration areas, business administration (M.B.A.), and an accelerated Executive M.B.A. (EMBA).  The MBA program is available on-campus or online and the E.M.B.A. program is taught on weekends.

Martin Tuchman School of Management Courses

ACCT 115. Fundamentals of Financial Accounting. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This is an introductory-level financial accounting course designed to develop fundamentals of financial accounting. This course will help students develop skills in applying financial accounting principles to record basic economic transactions, summarize and present such transactions in financial statements as well as to analyze reported accounting information from a user's perspective to make informed financial decisions. Students will also learn to appreciate accounting as a dynamic, changing discipline rather than an inflexible set of rules.

ACCT 117. Survey of Accounting. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This is an introductory course designed to develop fundamentals of financial accounting-a process of identifying, recording, and communicating economic events of an organization. This course will provide students with an opportunity to develop skills in applying financial accounting principles to record basic economic transactions, summarize and present such transactions in financial statements as well as analyze reported accounting information by using ratios.

ACCT 215. Managerial Accounting I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ACCT 115 or ACCT 117. This course introduces fundamentals of cost and managerial accounting, including an introduction to job orders and process costing systems, cost allocation, cost behavior, managerial decision models, cost and budgetary planning and control, standard costing, analysis of variance, and responsibility accounting. The course is designed to develop the fundamentals of managerial accounting and provide students with a working knowledge of how accounting data are used by management in planning, decision-making and operational control.

ACCT 325. Intermediate Accounting I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ACCT 215 or ACCT 116. This course provides an in-depth study of generally accepted accounting principles in the classification, presentation and disclosure of assets required by external users of financial statements. Students will learn to complete accounting cycle activities; prepare and evaluate financial statements with data from an accounting information system; apply financial accounting functions and theory to recognize and measure different types of assets; calculate earnings per share; carry out income tax accounting; and understand the nature and effect of accounting errors.

ACCT 335. Managerial Accounting II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ACCT 215. A study of the concepts and techniques used by cost accountants to assist decision-makers within the organization. In-depth, real-world scenarios will be discussed including process accounting, job-order accounting, measuring quality costs, activity-based costing, and evaluating performance. Students will be introduced to methods currently being used by American businesses, including service firms, as well as manufacturers.

ACCT 415. Auditing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ACCT 435. An examination of current auditing theory and procedures employed in carrying out the audit. The course will cover the life cycle of the audit from accepting an audit, gathering evidence to giving an opinion on a company's financial reports.

ACCT 425. Tax Accounting I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ACCT 215 or ACCT 116. This course is the first part of the two tax accounting courses, with a focus on federal individual income taxation. It is designed to give the students a comprehensive understanding of personal income tax laws and to able him to prepare personal income tax returns of considerable complexity. Topics covered in this course will include gross income, property transactions, capital gains/losses, itemized deductions employee expenses, depreciation, accounting methods and tax credits, among others.

ACCT 435. Intermediate Accounting II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ACCT 325. This is the second part of the two intermediate level financial accounting courses designed to review the basic financial required statements and provide accounting students with in-depth study of accounting principles advanced by responsible professional organizations. Topics covered include the classification, presentation and disclosure of assets, liabilities and stockholders' equity for external users of financial information.

ACCT 490. Independent Study in Acct. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: ACCT 325 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

ECON 201. Economics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The nature of a market economy. Microeconomics, demand theory, production possibilities, cost and price, equilibrium analysis, and applications to decision making in the firm. Macroeconomics, national income accounts, consumption, investment, government monetary and fiscal policy, and problems of employment and price levels. Economic analysis leading to an understanding of current developments in the United States economy and international trade and currency problems. Students who have received credit for ECON 265 or ECON 266 may not subsequently receive credit for ECON 201.

ECON 265. Microeconomics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 135 or MATH 138 or MATH 111. The theory of price determination and resource allocation under various market structures. The theory of demand, production, costs, factor and product pricing, income distribution, market failure, implications of government intervention in the market, and comparison of the free enterprise and alternative systems. Students who have received credit for SS 201 may not subsequently receive credit for ECON 265.

ECON 266. Macroeconomics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The theory of national income determination. The determinants of aggregate production, employment and prices, as well as money and banking, business cycles and monetary and fiscal policy. Students who have received credit for ECON 201 may not subsequently receive credit for ECON 266.

ECON 485. Special Topics in Economics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

ENTR 410. New Venture Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: Junior standing. Provides an understanding of the process of start up and early stage management of new, technology based, small firms. Emphasis is on recognizing, evaluating and deciding on a new business idea, as well as preparation for and management of the start up process. Preparation and execution of a new business plan.

ENTR 420. Financing New Venture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: FIN 315 and ENTR 410 The course is organized around three fundamental issues that entrepreneurs need to understand: 1) how innovations evolve over time, 2) how and whys some innovations are successful and some are not and 3) how one manages a new venture that was formed to develop new technologies. It is intended to help students understand the issues associated with a new venture and to develop a business plan to launch a technology based firm.

ENTR 430. Entrepreneurial Strategy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HRM 301, MRKT 330, MIS 345, FIN 315, ACCT 317, OM 375, MGMT 491. Integrates knowledge of the different aspects of business learned in previous course work. In addition, provides an understanding of the decisions that guide the overall operations of a business organization and how the organization interacts with its markets, competitors, and suppliers. For the student who is considering starting or managing a small business. Combines classroom instruction in business strategy along with case analysis of small firms.

ENTR 440. Lean Startup Accelerator. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This is a hands-on workshop to help students get their new business idea launched. It utilizes the Lean Startup Methodology where students are expected to interview and acquire actual customers during the course.

ENTR 485. ST:. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of innovation and entrepreneurship and their application not regularly covered in any other business or entrepreneurship course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior ro the offering of the course.

ENTR 490. Independent Study in ENTR. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: ENTR 410 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

FIN 218. Financial Markets and Institutions. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ACCT 115 or ACCTt 117, ECON 266 or ECON 201, MATH 105. This course provides an overview of the main features of financial markets and institutions in the United States, including interest rates and rates of return and how they are determined. It also covers securities traded on the U.S. financial markets including bonds, stocks, and derivatives and discusses how financial institutions, especially commercial banks work, along with the role of government in regulating financial markets and institutions.

FIN 315. Fundamentals of Corporate Finance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ACCT 115, or ACCT 117, ECON 265 or ECON 201, MATH 105. This course focuses on how companies invest in real assets and how they raise the money to pay for those investments. Topics covered include the firm and the financial manager, time value of money, bonds, stocks, and net present value. International finance, risk management, capital structure strategy and case studies of technology-based companies will be introduced.

FIN 401. Securities in Financial Markets. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: FIN 218 and FIN 315. This course offers a quantitative approach to evaluating fixed income securities and to managing bond portfolios. Specific topics include: modern theory of bond pricing, pricing of high risk bonds, derivatives, and risk management.

FIN 402. Financial Risk Measurement and Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites FIN 218 and FIN 315. This course offers an in-depth analysis of the measurement and management of risk in financial markets. Topics include: assessing overall market risk, credit risk, liquidity risk, settlement risk, volatility risk, measuring portfolio risk, and extreme value risk.

FIN 403. Financial Statement Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites FIN 218 and FIN 315. This course offers comprehensive coverage of analysis of financial statements so that students can: a) evaluate the financial position of a firm; b) assess the firm's inherent value and the value of its securities; c) assess the firm's obligations and its ability to meet them; and d) analyze sources and uses of cash.

FIN 416. Advanced Corporate Finance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites FIN 218 and FIN 315. Advanced corporate finance with an emphasis on the financial management of technology-based organizations. Case studies are used for comparative analysis. Emphasis is on organizational productivity and profitability.

FIN 417. Adv Portfolio Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

FIN 422. International Finance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites FIN 218 and FIN 315. Introduction to the international financial management of the firm with an emphasis on technology-based organizations. Topics covered include hedging currency risk, capital budgeting internationally, raising funds internationally. Global competitiveness is addressed with comparative analysis of the financial management practices of American, European and Japanese firms.

FIN 423. Risk Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: FIN 315. The management of risk in the business enterprise. Topics include meas-urement of risk and hedging strategies, sources of liability, property and liability insurance, and insurance administration.

FIN 430. Options and Futures Markets. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: FIN 218, FIN 315, MATH 135 (or MATH 138, MATH 111). This course covers options, forward contracts, futures contracts and swaps, and will give students a working knowledge of how these contracts work, how they are used, and how they are priced. Students will learn how corporations and portfolio managers can hedge different kinds of risks or alter the distribution of returns on their portfolios using various techniques.

FIN 485. Special Topics in Finance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

FIN 490. Independent Study in Finance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: FIN 218, FIN 315 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

HRM 301. Organizational Behavior. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: upper division standing. A foundation course in individual and group behavior in organizations. Processes such as perception, motivation and leadership are examined with a focus on issues central to technology-based organizations (innovation, creativity, managing technical professionals).

HRM 303. Human Resources Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Covers basic human resources concepts including recruitment, selection, EEO, training, labor relations, and human resources information systems. Human resources management practices in technology-based firms are studied in detail.

HRM 310. Managing Diversity in Organizations. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Analyzes issues that arise in managing a diverse work force. After examining the demographic environment of contemporary organizations, significant attention is paid to developing strategies to recruit, train, motivate, and retain employees with diverse personal characteristics. While the emphasis is on developing broad-based interpersonal skills, the impact of federal and state laws and regulations is also studied. In addition, students examine the implications of technological developments for managing a diverse population (e.g., the use of new technologies in retaining the differently abled).

HRM 415. Organizational Design and Development. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HRM 301. Focuses on the design of modern organizations with an emphasis on effectively responding to environmental and technological change. Design issues include analyzing organizational structures, understanding the process of organizational learning, and evaluating organizational cultures. Development issues focus on employee empowerment, vertical and horizontal communication in organizations, and self-managed work teams.

HRM 485. Special Topics in Human Resource Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

MGMT 190. Introduction to Business. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (3;0;1).

Introduction to the School of Management and the Business major. Foundations of the business enterprise and ecosystem. Organizational structures, governance, financial systems, marketing, and government interactions. Economic, political, psychological, and social influences on business. Incorporates freshman seminar topics related to a successful college life, including time management, study skills, interpersonal relationships, wellness, multicultural issues and career decision making.

MGMT 216. Business Statistics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MATH 105 or MATH 333. Introduction to business data analysis for application in management decision-making processes. Productivity measures, employment trends, national income data, and consumer price changes. Methods for collection of business and economic data, presentation of data and computer applications, index numbers, historical analysis trend projections, survey sampling, and planning for business research.

MGMT 290. Business Law I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The basic principles of common and statutory law applicable to business and professional relationships, emphasizing contracts, negotiable instruments, sales of goods, agency and business organizations.

MGMT 310. Co-op Work Experience I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 30 credits at NJIT, approval of the school and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated and approved by the co-op office. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.

MGMT 316. Business Research Methods. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (2;1;0).

Prerquisites: MGMT 216, MIS 245. This course covers business research methodologies with an emphasis on data collection/mining and data analysis. It offers the knowledge skills to conduct research in all applicable fields from the traditional areas of business, such as, marketing, finance, human resources, operations and service management, as well as web-based e-commerce related research applications. Upon completion, students will be able to: (1) understand business research methodologies, (2) conduct business research studies, (3) present the results, analyses and recommendations to management.

MGMT 350. Knowledge Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MIS 245. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to Knowledge Management. This term is used to refer to the ways in which organizations create, gather, manage and use the knowledge. Emphasis is placed on the information systems needed to capture and distribute knowledge and how knowledge can be used to gain competitive advantage.

MGMT 360. Business Law II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The course will cover concepts required for the CPA Exam. Current cases will illustrate legal principles and how courts make decisions. Topics include corporate information and termination, agency and employment issues and forms of discrimination, comparisons of U.S. laws with those in other countries, the ethical context for business decisions, insider trading, online securities fraud, and disclosure of financial information on corporate blogs and tweets, including the tax consequences.

MGMT 390. Principles of Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. This course explores strategies that allow companies to grow and compete in today’s global marketplace, along with skills you will need to turn ideas into action for success in business. You will get an overview of key business processes, and an understanding of how they work together. Learning will be reinforced by real time case studies. A comprehensive project-based learning exercise will allow you to act as a management consultant and relate what you cover in class to a real company.

MGMT 410. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: MGMT 310 or equivalent, approval of the school, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience as a co-op/intern. Mandatory participation in seminar and completion of requirements that include a report and/or project.

MGMT 480. Managing Technology and Innovation. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: Junior standing(57 credits). Introduction to an array of technologies affecting management functions to provide an appreciation and understanding of the importance of new technologies as critical success factors for modern organizations. An integrative approach is taken in analyzing how changes in technology affect individual, group, and organizational effectiveness.

MGMT 485. Special Topics in Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

MGMT 490. Independent Study in Managemen. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: HRM 301 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

MGMT 491. International Business. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MGMT 190 or MGMT 390 or HRM 301, FIN 315, ECON 266 or ECON 201. A basic understanding of the activities in international business providing a framework for understanding them from the perspective of a company manager. Covers international trade, multinational enterprises, foreign exchange, foreign direct investment, international financial institutions, barriers to international trade, accounting of taxation, industrial relations, multinational enterprise, and world order.

MGMT 492. Business Policy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: senior standing. A capstone course in the area of business administration focusing on the integration of concepts taught in various functional courses such as marketing, finance, operations management, accounting, organizational behavior. Issues related to corporate responsibilities and ethical behavior are also incorporated in this course. Emphasis on application of concepts to real life situation is achieved through case discussion and projects. All SOM students need to earn a C or better in MGMT 492 in order to graduate.

MGMT 499. Senior Seminar: Career Planning and MFT. 1 credit, 1 contact hour (1;0;0).

A one credit, satisfactory/unsatisfactory course that will allow students to get the career training they need prior to entering work force, as well as review for the Major Fields Test and to actually take the Major Field Test in the course. Corequisite: MGMT 492. This course runs for the first 10 weeks of the semester.

MIS 245. Introduction to Management Information Systems. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Concepts of information systems, business process, hardware, software, systems analysis, e-commerce, enterprise systems and computer applications in organizations, techniques of systems analysis, systems designs, implementations, and information management (both technical and behavioral)are studied in the organizational context of management information needs.

MIS 363. Project Management for Managers. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: Junior standing (57 credits). This course covers theories, tools, and techniques to manage projects in organizations. Students will learn how to put together a project charter, define project goals, and develop project teams, schedules, and budgets. The course will illustrate the key aspects of project lifecycles (initiation, planning, execution, monitor and control, and closing). It will also emphasize aspects of team, performance, risk, and quality management.

MIS 445. Decision Support Systems and OLAP. 4 credits, 6 contact hours (2;4;0).

Prerequisites: MIS 345 and OM 375.Introduces students to the use of decision support systems (DSS) to support management decisions. Topics include: DSS software tools, model management, and DSS design and use.

MIS 485. Special Topics in Management Information Systems. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

MIS 490. Independent Study in MIS. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: MIS 245 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

MRKT 330. Principles of Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Provides an understanding of how environmental factors (political, legal, economy, competition, socio-cultural, and technology) influence the design of product, pricing, promotion and distribution strategies. Topics discussed include strategies to satisfy target markets, market segmentation, buyer behavior, marketing ethics, and an introduction to global marketing issues. Fundamentals of marketing are integrated using cases, videos, and class projects.

MRKT 331. Consumer and Buyer Behavior. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 105 and MRKT 330. Psychological, social, and economic influences on consumer behavior. The application of consumer behavioral innovation to marketing decisions: research and measurement techniques, individual influences, environmental influences, and consumer information processing and decision making. A field research project will be undertaken.

MRKT 332. Advertis Theory & Techn. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

MRKT 338. Product Development and Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. The process of product development is studied in detail with specific emphasis on technology-driven innovation. Techniques for getting closer to customers including TQM principles are also covered.

MRKT 339. Professional Selling. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. Provides an understanding of multifaceted roles salespeople play and prepares students for sales careers in business-to-business firms. Discusses the personal selling process that include prospecting and qualifying, sales call planning, approaching prospects, giving sales demonstrations and presentations, negotiating sales resistance, confirming and closing "win-win" agreements. Places emphasis on building customer relationships and partnerships by providing customer service and to ensure satisfaction and build customer loyalty. Concepts are discussed and integrated using role-playing, experiential exercies, videos, cases and class projects.

MRKT 360. Internet Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. Provides an overview of fundamental principles of Internet marketing for the contemporary business environment. Topics include Internet marketing strategies, Internet marketing plan, and development of Internet-based marketing programs.

MRKT 420. Product & Brand Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Pre-requisite: MRKT 330. The aim of the course is to equip students with theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for the successful and efficient management of products and brands. It provides the framework for the analysis of the main factors determining success of a brand in the market and introduces techniques and tools necessary for management of products and brands. This course will provide a fundamental understanding of how to build, measure, and manage a brand. The course will also provide an understanding of the role of product management/manager.

MRKT 430. Marketing Research. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. The process of marketing research is studied in detail from study design through report preparation. A hands-on, experiential approach is taken with an emphasis on secondary research and multivariate statistical methods. Data analysis is conducted using SAS and/or SPSS.

MRKT 432. Sales Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 339 This course helps the student to understand the various sales management activities that sales managers are responsible for in their important role as revenue generation managers. Key topics that are discussed within the realm of organizing, managing and controlling the sales force include sales forcasting, budgeting, sales force organization, time and territory management, recruitment, selection and training the salespeople, leadership, motivation, compensation, and sales force performance evaluation. Sales ethics and customer relationship management issues are also addressed.

MRKT 433. Marketing Channel Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330 This course develops a managerial framework to the field of marketing. Theory, research and practice are integrated to disucss distribution channel decision making implications. Students will understand the role played by the distribution system or network of alliances among agents, wholesalers, distributors and retailers to attain a firm’s distribution of objectives. The course discusses the flow of goods through a distribution channel from the producer to the final consumer. Key topics include marketing channel strategy, channel design, channel management as a well as selecting, motivating, and evaluating the performance of marketing intermediaries. It also discusses the importance of electronic channels that have become prominent in the distribution process.

MRKT 434. Business to Business Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. Techniques for marketing industrial products to organizations in the manufacturing, service, government, and non-profit sectors are covered within the context of a global marketplace. Emphasis is on the marketing of high technology products using a customer-driven approach.

MRKT 435. International Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MRKT 330. This course will help students understand how the product, pricing, promotion and distribution elements of the marketing mix are influenced by international forces (cultural, political-legal, economic, competitive, and technological environment). Topics discussed include global market segmentation, marketing ethics, standardization or adaptation of the marketing mix as well as global information systems and market research, segmentation, targeting, and foreign market entry strategies (importing, exporting, licensing, and strategic alliances). Course concepts are integrated using cases, videos, and class projects.

MRKT 485. Special Topics in Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The study of new and/or advanced topics in the various fields of business and their application not regularly covered in any other business course. The precise topics to be covered, along with prerequisites, are announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course.

MRKT 490. Independent Study in Marketing. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: MRKT 330 and approval of proposal by the SOM faculty member or lecturer who will supervise the study. Self-paced study on some aspect of managing organizations. Cannot substitute for any required course nor duplicate the coverage of any regularly offered course. Accepted proposals and project results are kept in a file available to all SOM faculty and instructional staff and to students contemplating starting an independent study project.

OM 375. Management Science. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MGMT 216. Introduction to statistical and mathematical techniques used in management decision making. Develop the concepts of management science and use its techniques with unrestricted focus. Operations management applications are made in factory settings, health-care and other service industries, education and government agencies.