Mechanical Engineering is concerned with the design, development, manufacture, and operation of a wide variety of energy conversion and machine systems. Mechanical engineers employ their knowledge of materials, system design and control, production methods, and mechanics to design traditional systems (such as aircraft, automobiles, engines, robots, energy-generation plants, pumps and valves, machines and household appliances), as well as systems utilizing new technologies (such as biomedical and nano devices), to meet design specifications for performance, economy, and ease of use while complying to safety and environmental protection requirements.

The mechanical engineering program strives to develop mechanical engineering graduates who can achieve fulfilling careers in the areas of engineering practice, professional growth and service. The expectations of the accomplishments and characteristics of their career in these areas are the objectives of the ME program.

The educational preparation necessary for attainment of these objectives can only be realized through the curriculum, the instructional process and related activities of the educational program.The first two years of the curriculum provide a foundation in mathematics and science for the mechanical engineering courses offered in the third year.

The fourth year utilizes the knowledge acquired during the first three years to develop professional skills in applied areas such as thermal and fluid engineering, and systems design and control. Project courses are offered in the fourth year. CAD/CAM systems are used extensively throughout the curriculum.

The mechanical engineering curriculum prepares the student for professional work as well as graduate study in engineering or in other areas such as science, mathematics, management, medicine, law and business.

The curriculum as described below is for students entering NJIT in the fall of 2006 or after that date.  Students entering before that date generally have a different program and should consult the department to learn which curriculum applies.

The Industrial Engineering curriculum prepares engineers to design, improve, install, and operate the integrated systems of people, materials, and facilities needed by industry, commerce, and society. Industrial engineers solve problems which arise in the management of systems by applying the principles of engineering science, product and process design, work analysis, human factors principles, and operations research. Industrial engineering leads to a wide variety of professional opportunities in manufacturing, service, research and development and public service enterprises, and to graduate study in  industrial engineering, engineering management, business administration, law and other fields.  

The industrial engineering curriculum combines three professional areas of practice: product and production process design, work analysis, and engineering management science. Students are also offered exposure to the more specialized areas of automated manufacturing systems, information systems, quality assurance, and safety engineering. In the freshman and sophomore years, the program concentrates on mathematics, physical science, and engineering science, an adequate background in these being essential to the courses presented in the later years. The courses stress fundamental principles and concepts which develop gradually and eventually culminate in a system design dealing with real engineering and management situations in an industrial commercial or public service enterprise.   

The curriculum as described here is for students entering NJIT as  freshmen in the fall of 2007 or after that date. Students entering before that date may have a different program and should consult the department to learn which curriculum applies.

Missions

The Mission of Mechanical Engineering

To educate mechanical engineering graduates to help the state and the country in general to stay competitive at the cutting edge of technology, to serve the profession of engineering, to become leaders in business, academia, industry, and the community and to engage in a lifetime of learning and achievement to benefit mankind.

The Mission of Industrial Engineering   

The mission of the department is to

  • provide for all our students an environment conducive to learning and personal growth;
  • educate a diverse undergraduate and graduate student body for successful employment in industry and the pursuit of advanced studies;
  • prepare students, both undergraduate and graduate, for future managerial and leadership roles;
  • engage in research to support the advanced education of graduate students, maintain the intellectual vitality of the faculty, and expand the frontiers of knowledge in areas of importance to the state and nation;
  • serve our profession through membership and leadership on national and international societies, and editorial boards, and
  • serve our community by offering our expertise to industries, state and local constituencies, and pre-college students and teachers.

Educational Objectives

Mechanical Engineering Program Educational Objectives

The objectives are our expectations of the accomplishments and characteristics of the careers of our graduates in the areas of engineering practice, professional growth and service. The current Mechanical Engineering (ME) program objectives are:

  1. ME graduates are successfully engaged in mechanical engineering design processes and the practical application of engineering theory, methods and practices into various fields including alternative energy systems, manufacturing, controls, robotics, materials, and biomedical systems and devices.
  2. ME graduates advance their professional growth and development through activities such as graduate study in engineering, professional registration, and continuing education, with some graduates transitioning into other professional fields.
  3. ME graduates are effectively engaged in service to their professional societies, as well as their local, national or global communities.

Industrial Engineering Program Educational Objectives

1. Program graduates use the fundamental principles and major areas of Industrial Engineering in their professional practice.

2. Program graduates are life-long learners, pursuing graduate education, and professional growth in Industrial Engineering and related fields.

3. Program graduates pursue diverse career paths in a variety of industries.

Program Outcomes

Mechanical Engineering Program Outcomes

Graduates of the Mechanical Engineering program will have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

This program is accredited by Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://abet.org

Industrial Engineering Program Outcomes

Graduates of the Industrial Engineering program will have:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering
  • An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • An ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams
  • An ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems
  • An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility
  • An ability to communicate effectively
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context
  • A recognition of the need for, and the ability to engage in life-long learning
  • A knowledge of contemporary issues
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

The undergraduate Industrial Engineering Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://abet.org

NJIT Faculty

A

Abdel-Malek, Layek, Professor

Abdou, George, Associate Professor

B

Bengu, Golgen, Associate Professor

Bladikas, Athanassios, Associate Professor

C

Cai, Wenbo, Assistant Professor

Caudill, Reggie J, Professor

Chen, Rong-Yaw, Professor Emeritus

Chester, Shawn A., Assistant Professor

D

Das, Sanchoy K., Professor

Droughton, John V., Professor Emeritus

F

Fenster, Saul K., Professor Emeritus

Fischer, Ian S., Professor

Florio, Pasquale J., Associate Professor

H

Harnoy, Avraham, Professor

Hatch, C., Richard, Professor Emeritus

J

Ji, Zhiming, Associate Professor

K

Kirchner, Robert P., Professor Emeritus

Koplik, Bernard, Professor

Kountouras, Harry V., Senior University Lecturer

L

Lee, Eon Soo, Assistant Professor

Linden, Martin J., Professor Emeritus

M

Mani, Balraj Subra, University Lecturer

McDermott, Kevin J., Associate Professor

N

Nadimpalli, Siva P.V., Assistant Professor

Narh, Kwabena A., Professor

R

Rao, I. Joga, Professor

Rosato, Anthony D., Professor

S

Samardzic, Veljko, University Lecturer

Singh, Pushpendra, Professor

Sodhi, Rajpal Singh, Professor

Surjanhata, Herli, Senior University Lecturer

T

Tricamo, Stephen J., Professor

W

Wilson, Charles E., Professor Emeritus

Wolf, Carl, Professor Emeritus

Z

Zhu, Chao, Professor

Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Courses

IE 101. Introduction to Industrial Engineering. 1 credit, 2 contact hours (1;1;0).

An Introduction to the field of Industrial Engineering, the functions performed by industrial engineers, career paths and opportunities in the field, introduction to the student and senior professional societies, and initiation of a mentoring program.

IE 203. Applications of Computer Graphics in Industrial Engineering. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (1;2;0).

Restriction: sophomore standing. Methods, tools and technologies of networked, graphical/visual communication systems with an industrial engineering focus. Lean and sustainable green enterprise, product, process, service and shop floor level visual factory management systems. Provides analytical and practical knowledge of computer graphics in IE, including graphical standards necessary to meet the requirements of today?s practice. Introduction of modern web-based software tools and systems.

IE 224. Production Process Design. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Restriction: sophomore standing. Introduction to the theory and practice of manufacturing processes. Study covers the fabrication of metallic, plastic, and electrical products, operation of NC and other automatic equipment, and economics of the design and production process.

IE 310. Co-op Work Experience I. 0 credits, 0 contact hours (0;0;0).

Restriction: junior standing, approval of co-op faculty advisor, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their aca-demic program. Work assignments facilitated by the co-op office and approved by the co-op faculty advisor. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.

IE 331. Applied Statistical Methods. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MATH 211. A presentation of statistical analysis techniques and their applications. Topics include the statistical measures describing data, frequency distributions, probability distributions, sampling parameter estimation, hypothesis testings, regression analyses, and analyses of variance. Special emphasis on their application to industrial fields.

IE 334. Engineering Economy and Capital Investment. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior standing. Introduction to the principles of engineering economics for utilization and evaluation of capital investments, including time value of money, depreciation, cost of capital, life cycle cost, net present value, and payback. Consideration of decisions involving multiple choice replacement, uncertainty, and risk.

IE 335. Engineering Cost Analysis and Control. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior standing. The tools and techniques applicable for cost analysis and control including standard costs, variance analysis, cost volume relationships, cost estimation, and utilization of accounting data for control of operations.

IE 339. Work Measurement and Standards. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisites: IE 203, IE 224. Emphasizes the measurement and evaluation of existing work methods and how improvement can be achieved. Topics include visual and micro-motion study techniques, motion economy, time study, and work sampling. The development and use of standard data and computerized techniques. Also, hands-on experience through a series of laboratory experiments.

IE 355. Human Factors. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior standing. Human-machine systems analysis including study of workplace layout, measurement of employee efficiency and productivity, criteria for tool and fixture design or selection, industrial fatigue, environmental influences on performance including the effects of illumination, noise, vibration, thermal, and other atmospheric factors. Basic ideas of industrial hygiene; the impact of OSHA; and special techniques for experimenting with human subjects, via demonstrations and supervised experiments.

IE 411. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisite: IE 310. Restriction: approval of co-op faculty advisor and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Full-time work experience of approximately one semester's duration. Provides major-related work experience as a co-op/intern. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and an oral presentation to IE faculty. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

IE 436. Cost Analysis and Engineering Economics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. Not open to industrial engineering majors. Focuses on the economic factors of concern to manufacturing engineers. Major topics include justification of proposed capital expenditures, equipment retirement and replacement decisions, cost determination, profitability studies, and manufacturing budget construction and utilization for cost control.

IE 439. Deterministic Models in Operations Research. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MATH 222 or equivalent. The deterministic techniques of operations research. Topics include the applications of linear, nonlinear, integer, and dynamic programming methods and network flows analysis to solve industrial and systems engineering problems.

IE 440. Stochastic Models in Operations Research. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: IE 331, MATH 222 or their equivalent. Probabilistic techniques of operations research. Topics include the applications of Markov chains, queueing and inventory control models to analyze and evaluate systems performance.

IE 441. Information and Knowledge Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. Introduction to recent advances in the application of computers in industrial engineering and database structures, both sequential and random. Description of methods for organizing data, database modeling, information storage and retrieval. Also, applications of expert systems concepts and techniques.

IE 443. Senior Project I. 2 credits, 4 contact hours (1;3;0).

Restriction: senior standing. Introduction to senior design project. Selection of specific system design for the project, establishment of initial contacts, preliminary collection and analysis of system data. Concepts of system design analysis emphasizing simulation modeling and analysis, model verification, and model validation.

IE 444. Senior Project II. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (1;2;0).

Prerequisite: IE 443. Senior design project, in which the concepts of industrial engineering systems, principles, and procedures are integrated and applied in industrial projects or case studies.

IE 445. Idustrial Simulation. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: CS 101, IE 331 or equivalent. Introduction to the application of simulation modeling for the analysis of complex industrial and manufacturing service systems. Examples are chosen from real-life situations such as warehousing, material handling, robotics, transportation, and hospital emergency rooms. Verification/validation as well as statistical analysis of both input/output data are introduced.

IE 447. Legal Aspects of Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. Familiarization with the U.S. system of case law, statutes and regulations applicable to professional relationships involving the engineer. Includes contracts, property, product liability and other torts, governmental regulatory bodies such as OSHA, EPA, and NRC, professional liability, and role of codes and standards.

IE 449. Industrial Robotics. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisites: CS 101, PHYS 121, junior or senior standing. Robotics in manufacturing systems. The field of robotics is studied with emphasis given to the role of programmable robots in manufacturing. Hands-on experience with hardware and software necessary for various industrial robot systems through laboratory experience.

IE 450. Product Engineering Standards. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: senior standing. Developing and using standards in the design, manufacturing, and use of products. Topics include economics of parts standardization, drawing and assembly techniques, and use of national and international standards. Review of the role of standards-setting bodies and methods for the development of product testing standards used in industry and commerce.

IE 451. Industrial Measuring Systems. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: IE 331. Reviews contemporary measuring systems and provides a basic under-standing of the various methods, their accuracy, reliability, and relative costs to perform. Includes measuring methods needed for compliance evaluation in accordance with occupational and safety legislation, industrial processes, and product design.

IE 453. Computer Integrated Manufacturing. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. Examines the components of computer integrated manufacturing (CIM) including the design of information frameworks and network protocols required to orchestrate full manufacturing automation. Study of CAD, CAPP, robotics, NC, CNC, computer interfacing, and database systems in the context of a CIM environment. Exposure to state-of-the-art CIM software and hardware.

IE 455. Robotics and Programmable Logic Controllers. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. Introduction to the design and implementation of programmable logic controllers for use in industry in the areas of automotive assembly, pharmaceutical manufacturers, the chemical industry, and others. Includes ladder logic, input/output ports, continuous process control, timing and counting functions, chaining sequences, and digital gate logic.

IE 456. Introduction to Industrial Hygiene. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: IE 355. Analysis of the effects of various environmental stressors on people at work, including their interference with performance and the development of acute and chronic health problems. Study of how numerous airborne contaminants, noise, thermal extremes, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, etc., affect workers alone and in combination. Topics include measurement and evaluation techniques, TLVs, control methodologies, legal requirements for employers.

IE 459. Production Planning and Control. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: IE 221, IE 439, junior or senior standing. A study of the components and functioning of integrated production, planning, and control systems. Forecasting, aggregate planning, scheduling, and recent models of production and inventory control for optimizing continuous and intermittent manufacturing operations. MRP basics. Introduction to using a computer to apply scheduling models.

IE 460. Measuring Techiniques and Quality Control. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: understanding of basic probability. Not open to industrial engineering majors; intended for other engineers, inspection supervisors, and management. Various types of control charts and acceptance sampling systems and procedures. These techniques are used widely in industry to improve product quality and reduce costs.

IE 461. Product Quality Assurance. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: IE 331. Methods used to achieve higher product quality, to prevent defects, to locate chronic sources of trouble, to measure process capability, and to use inspection data to regulate manufacturing processes are emphasized. Preparation of statistical control charts and selection of suitable sampling plans.

IE 463. Invention and Entrepreneurship. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: Junior or Senior standing or permission of instructor. This course will teach students the process of developing new products. It takes students from the art of creativity through product design and concludes with the formulation of a business plan for marking and production. If the new product satisfies the requirements of novelty, usefulness and nonobviousness, a patent application may be filed.

IE 466. Material Handling and Facilities Layout. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: IE 439. Analysis of organized human activities typified by industrial and office operations. Recent methods are applied to optimize location and layout of facilities. Introduction to modern material handling systems, expert systems in plant layout, logistics of motion of people and materials, flow analysis, plant layout, and material handling techniques.

IE 469. Reliability in Engineering Systems. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: IE 331 or equivalent, senior standing. Emphasizes the determination of systems reliability from a knowledge of characteristics and reliability of individual system components. Topics include reliability concepts, failure rates, systems analysis, optimization, maintenance, etc. Covers techniques for the formulation and evaluation of reliability models.

IE 472. Product Liability Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. The techniques available to the engineer to minimize the hazards of design and manufacturing that result in product liability cases. The effect of legal precedents on design, manufacturing, advertising, marketing, and using a product within developing technical disciplines such as: reliability prediction and analysis methods, assuring the quality of manufactured products, loss control systems, safety engineering precepts, human factors principles and design review. Review of government regulations for safety and protection.

IE 473. Safety Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. The principles and practices of safety engineering in product and facilities design. Safe practices and hazard control, safety standards and codes, inspection procedures, the role of insurance, governmental regulations, and safety statistics. Participation in current safety engineering research studies. The Occupational Safety and Health Act and related legislation.

IE 480. Special Studies in Industrial Engineering for Non-Majors. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: permission of the IE faculty advisor. Not open to industrial engineering majors. Individual investigations under faculty guidance through consultation, readings, and visits with recognized authorities and institutions, dealing with specialized industrial engineering problems. Explore in depth an area of interest and give a report in a seminar setting, and submit a written project report.

IE 481. Investigations in Industrial Engineering I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Restriction: junior or senior standing, per-mission of the IE faculty advisor. Individual investigation under faculty guidance through consultation, readings, and visits with recognized authorities and institutions, dealing with specialized industrial engineering design problems. Explore in depth an area of interest and give a report in a seminar setting, and submit a written project report.

IE 482. Investigations in Industrial Engineering II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: IE 481, permission of the IE faculty advisor. Further individual investigations, a continuation of IE 481.

IE 492. Engineering Management. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Restriction: junior or senior standing. An introduction for engineering majors to the fundamentals of engineering economics and the management process for engineering and development. Major topics include capital investment justification methods, project organization, scheduling and control techniques, legal, quality, and staffing issues.

ME 215. Engineering Materials and Processes. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisite: CHEM 126 or CHEM 122. Students also must register for the lab component. Combined lecture and laboratory relating to the study of engineering materials. Processes of formation from liquid and particle state, plastic forming, molding deformation, and metal removal. Effects of heat treatment on material properties. Laboratory exercises involve basic machine tools and computer-controlled equipment.

ME 231. Kinematics of Machinery. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: CS 101, MECH 234. Design, selection, and evaluation of mechanisms for various applications. Topics include displacement, velocity, and acceleration analysis of planar linkages, synthesis of function generators and motion generators, design of cams, gear-tooth geometry and analysis of gear trains.

ME 304. Fluid Mechanics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MECH 236, ME 311. Introduction to the basic principles of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy as they apply to engineering systems which utilize fluids. Some of the topics are dimensional analysis, theoretical and empirical analysis of one-dimensional compressible and incompressible flow, empirical analysis of external and internal flows, and elementary boundary layer theory.

ME 305. Introduction to System Dynamics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 222, MECH 236, ME 231. Principles of dynamic system modeling and response with emphasis on mechanical, electrical, and fluid systems. Application of computer simulation techniques.

ME 310. Co-op Work Experience I. 0 credits, 0 contact hours (0;0;0).

Prerequisites: completion of freshman year, approval of department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated by the co-op office and approved by the department. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.

ME 311. Thermodynamics I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 211, PHYS 111. Thermodynamic fundamentals. Topics are the first and second laws of thermodynamics, physical properties of pure substances, entropy, ideal and real gases, and gaseous mixtures.

ME 312. Thermodynamics II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ME 311. A continuation of ME 311 including studies of irreversibility and combustion. Thermodynamic principles are applied to the analysis of power generation, refrigeration, and air-conditioning systems. Introduction to solar energy thermal processes, nuclear power plants, and direct energy conversion.

ME 315. Stress Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 222, MECH 237, ME 215. Problems related to mechanical design. Topics include two-dimensional elasticity, transformation of stress and strain, plane stress problems, axisymmetric members, buckling criteria, and failure theories.

ME 316. Machine Design. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 231, ME 315. Aspects of the design process and design of machine elements. Mini-projects are used to introduce engineering design procedures.

ME 339. Fundamentals of Mechanical Design. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: MECH 234. For industrial engineering majors. Topics include kinematics of mechanisms, machine components, and a brief intro-duction to mechanical vibrations. Students gain the ability to deal with design problems from the viewpoint of a non-specialist.

ME 343. Mechanical Laboratory I. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisites: EE 405, MATH 279 or MATH 333 and MECH 236. Students also must register for the lab component. Laboratory and lecture in instrumentation and measurement for mechanical engineering students. Applications for the sensing of such variables as pressure, tem-perature, mass flow, and displacement. Particular attention to the applicability and sensitivity of instruments.

ME 403. Mechanical Systems Design I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (2;1;0).

Prerequisites: ME 304, ME 305, ME 312, ME 316. Lectures and projects covering problem solving methodology in the design, analysis, and synthesis of mechanical and thermal systems. The student's academic background combines with engineering principles and topics to serve as a foundation for broad engineering projects. Emphasis on creative thinking and the engineering design process in projects involving the optimal conversion of resources.

ME 405. Mechanical Laboratory II. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (1;2;0).

Prerequisite: ME 343, ME 312. Laboratory emphasizing the use of fundamental principles and instrumentation systems for the analysis and evaluation of mechanical components within a system.

ME 406. Mechanical Laboratory III. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (1;2;0).

Prerequisite: ME 405, ME 407. Laboratory covering the testing and evaluation of complete mechanical systems.

ME 407. Heat Transfer. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 222, ME 304, ME 311. A study of the three fundamental modes of heat transfer: conduction, convection, and radiation. A physical interpretation of the many quantities and processes in heat transfer using numerical methods. Theory is applied to the analysis and design of heat exchangers and other applications. Where appropriate, computer simulation is used.

ME 408. Mechanical Systems Design II. 2 credits, 3 contact hours (1;2;0).

Prerequisite: ME 403, ME 407. A continuation of ME 403 from a more integrated viewpoint, with lectures on special topics. Concepts in optimization and computer simulation are considered in the design and synthesis of mechanical engineering systems. The projects are more comprehensive, emphasizing creative design, and requiring design decisions of a more sophisticated nature.

ME 410. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: ME 310, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Full-time work experience of approximately one semester's duration. Provides major related work experience as co-op/internship. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and project. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience.

ME 425. Finite Element Method in Mechanical Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: CIS 101, MATH 222, and MECH 237. Introduction to central ideas underlying the finite element method in mechanical engineering and its computer implementation. Fundamental concepts such as interpolation functions for one- and two-dimensional elements, bar element method, Galerkin's method, discretization of a model, methods of assembling global matrices, and the final solution techniques for obtaining nodal values. Specific applications to mechanical engineering problems in trusses, beams, torsion, heat transfer, fluid flow, plane stress, and plane strain.

ME 430. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisites: CS 101, FED 101 and MATH 222. Introduction to basic concepts of computer-aided design as applied to mechanical engineering design problems. Topics include numerical techniques, computer graphics, geometric modeling, design optimization, and databases for design. The laboratory uses current CAD software packages for mechanical design. Projects involve applications of the basic principles using student's own as well as available software.

ME 431. Introduction to Robotics and Automation. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: CS 101, MECH 236. Introduction to mechanics and control of robotic manipulators. Topics include spatial transformations, kinematics, dynamics, trajectory generation, actuators and control, and relations to product design and flexible automation.

ME 432. Principles of Air Conditioning and Refrigeration. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 304, ME 312; Corequisite: ME 407. A course in the fundamentals of air conditioning and refrigeration. Topics covered are psychometrics, cooling and heat load calculations, air distribution systems, duct design, vapor compression and absorption systems, and the principles of cooling towers.

ME 433. Vibration Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MECH 236, MATH 222. An introduction to the fundamental theory of mechanical vibrations. Undamped and damped systems with single and multiple degrees of freedom, transient vibration, vibrations of continuous media, and analog and numerical methods.

ME 435. Thermodynamics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MATH 211, PHYS 111. Intended for non-mechanical engineering students of all disciplines. Topics include the basic laws of thermodynamics, properties of fluids and solids, analysis of open and closed systems, gas and vapor power cycles, refrigeration and air conditioning, and an introduction to heat transfer. Cannot be taken for credit by mechanical engineering students.

ME 437. Structural Analysis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ME 315. Fundamentals of structural analysis. Consideration of stresses and deflections of beams as well as the design of beams, columns, trusses, and structural connections of steel, reinforced concrete, and timber structures.

ME 438. Introduction to Physical Metallurgy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: CHEM 126 or CHEM 122, and ME 215. Introduction to metallic microstructures, solid solutions and the mechanical properties of metals and alloys. Physical understanding of diffusion processes is emphasized in covering the relationship between the nature of metals and different heat treating processes.

ME 439. Principles of Tribology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: CHEM 126, MECH 237. An introduction to the principles of wear resistance of machine parts and tribology. Physical understanding of different mechanisms of wear and friction and methods of increasing durability.

ME 441. Computer Simulation and Analysis in Mechanical Engineering. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 430. This course covers various topics in Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE). The course provides an in-depth understanding and skill of constructing 2-D drawings using well-known commercial CAD package, and integrating 3-D solid modeling techniques into simulation, and analysis animation of new designs using commercial CAD/CAE software. The students will have hands-on experience to analyze Structure, Heat Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics problems by using several different software packages. The course also focuses on CAD Product Data Exchange using both Direct Database conversion and International Standards based conversion methods between major CAD/CAE systems. Typical industrial applications will be illustrated.

ME 451. Introduction to Aerodynamics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 304, ME 311. Introduction to the basic principles and properties of fluid flow around immersed bodies. Topics include the kinematics and dynamics of fluid fields, the thin airfoil, finite wing theory, and one-dimensional compressible flow.

ME 452. Dynamics of Space Flight. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: MECH 236, MATH 222. An introduction to the mechanics of space flight. After a brief introduction to the physics of the solar system, the dynamics of space flight are developed from the Newtonian viewpoint. Covers the performance and propulsion methods of rocketry.

ME 455. Automatic Controls. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ME 305. Introduction to the principles of automatic controls. Emphasis on systems, considering their mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic, thermal, and displacement -aspects. First and second order linear systems. Introduction to system analysis techniques such as Nyquist and Bode diagrams and applications in system design.

ME 470. Engineering Properties of Plastics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 215, MECH 237. A study of the physical properties of the various commerical thermosetting and thermoplastic resins. An introduction to linear viscoelastic theory and its relationship to measurable mechanical properties of plastics. Also, engineering properties such as flammability, chemical resistance, and electrical properties.

ME 471. Introduction to Polymer Processing Techniques. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites: ME 304, ME 407. A study of the various plastics processing techniques, including extrusion, injection molding, blow molding, compression molding, thermoforming, rotational molding, casting, etc. The relationship between product design and choice of process will be presented.

ME 490. Mechanical Engineering Project A. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: departmental approval required. One or more individually selected projects. Projects usually require library research, design, cost analysis, planning of testing. Also involves an engineering report and a technical presentation.

ME 491. Mechanical Engineering Project B. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisite: ME 490 and departmental approval required. One or more selected projects. Projects usually require library research, design, cost analysis, planning of testing. Also involves an engineering report and a technical presentation.