http://architecture.njit.edu

Accredited by: The National Architectural Accrediting Board.

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Master's degree programs may consist of a professional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the professional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

The New Jersey School of Architecture educates students to assume positions of responsibility and leadership in the architectural profession and in developing areas of opportunity in technology and community design related to the discipline of architecture. An emphasis on studio design in the curriculum is reinforced by courses in history, building science and social concerns. A diverse faculty brings its expertise to bear on issues of architecture, technology and culture and challenges students to prepare for their productive years as practitioners, scholars and researchers. The architecture program builds on the strengths of a technological university with its extensive capacity in computer graphics while emphasizing design directed toward the traditional human-centered values of architecture.

The total time needed to earn a Bachelor of Architecture (the first professional degree) at NJIT is five years.

The New Jersey School of Architecture offers a nonprofessional, four-year undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Architecture. The B.S. does not lead to licensure as an architect; instead it presents students with a wide array of other options leading to career opportunities within the building industry. Students can be admitted to the B.S. in Architecture program as a freshman or transfer from the B.Arch. program after two years. The B.S. in Architecture program requires 135 credits and is structured as follows:

The first two years of the B.S. in Architecture program are identical to the course of study for the five-year professional program.

In the third year, all B.S. students take ARCH 363 Architecture Studio III followed by a computer elective. Thus every student has at least one full year of computer-based learning. The B.S. in Architecture is designed to lead into a series of accelerated graduate degree programs in fields such as construction management (B.S. in Architecture/M.S. in Civil Engineering), infrastructure planning (B.S. in Architecture/Master in Infrastructure Planning), management (B.S. in Architecture/M.S. in Management; B.S. in Architecture/M.B.A. in Management of Technology), or a professional graduate degree in Architecture (B.S. in Architecture/Master of Architecture) leading to licensure. Graduate-level course descriptions for those listed in the dual degree programs description are located in the NJIT Graduate Catalog.

Course choices are worked out on an individual basis after consultation with the academic advisor to reflect a student's individual interests and career objectives. The B.S. in Architecture provides a wide array of curriculum paths; it is designed to provide a superb general education for all building professionals.

NJIT Faculty

A

Alcala, Jose M., University Lecturer

B

Bales, Ervin, Research Professor

Bess, Mark E., University Lecturer

Brothers, David A., Senior University Lecturer

Burgermaster, Matthew A., Assistant Professor

C

Cays, John M., Associate Dean for Academics, College of Architecture and Design

Celik, Zeynep, Distinguished Professor

D

Dart, James, University Lecturer

Decker, Martina, Assistant Professor

De Sousa Santos, Antonio P., Professor Emeritus

E

Elwell, David H., Associate Professor Emeritus

Esperdy, Gabrielle, Associate Professor

F

Franck, Karen A., Professor

G

Garber, Richard J., Associate Professor

Garcia Figueroa, Julio C., University Lecturer

Gauchat, Urs P., Professor

Goldman, Glenn, Professor

Greenfield, Sanford R., Professor Emeritus

H

Harp, Cleveland J., University Lecturer

Hurtado De Mendoza Wahrolen, Maria A., Associate Professor

K

Krumwiede, Keith A., Associate Professor

L

LeCavalier, Jesse, Assistant Professor

M

Moore, Sandy, Associate Professor

Mostoller, G. Michael, Distinguished Professor

N

Narahara, Taro, Assistant Professor

Navin, Thomas R., University Lecturer

O

Ogorzalek, Thomas, University Lecturer

P

Papademetriou, Peter C., Professor Emeritus

R

Russo, John Rhett, Associate Professor

S

Schuman, Anthony W., Associate Professor

Siegel, Joy W., University Lecturer

Sollohub, Darius T., Associate Professor

T

Taher, Rima, Senior University Lecturer

Theodore, Georgeen, Associate Professor

W

Wall, Donald R., Associate Professor Emeritus

Weisman, Leslie K., Professor Emeritus

Wendell, Augustus E., University Lecturer

West, Troy, Associate Professor Emeritus

Wood, Timothy Daniel, University Lecturer

Z

Zarzycki, Andrzej, Associate Professor

Zdepski, Michael, S., Associate Professor

New Jersey School of Architecture Courses

ARCH 155. Modes of Design Communication I. 3 credits, 6 contact hours (0;0;6).

Techniques of graphic presentation introduced as a basic language of architecture. Students work with a broad range of graphic presentation methods. Skills developed in drawing and architectural delineation. Fundamentals of perspective drawing, rendering techniques and format layout examined through an array of projects.

ARCH 156. Modes of Design Communication II. 3 credits, 6 contact hours (2;0;4).

Prerequisite:ARCH 161 Introduction to digital tools in the delinieation, fabrication, and representation of contemporary design.

ARCH 161. Intro Design and Digital Media. 6 credits, 13.5 contact hours (1.5;12;0).

This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles and elements of design. Emphasis on design methods, manipulation of form and space, and representation skills using traditional and digital instruments. General design fundamentals and techniques presented in the lecture hour.

ARCH 163. Introduction to Design I. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Introduction to an array of basic principles and elements of design. Emphasis on design methods, sensitivity to context, manipulation of form and space, and representation skills. General design fundamentals presented in the lecture hour.

ARCH 164. Introduction to Design II. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisite: ARCH 161 and ARCH 163. A continuation of ARCH 163.

ARCH 223. Construction I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course is an introduction to construction processes, focusing on wood, steel, masonry, concrete materials and their related assemblies.

ARCH 227. Environmental Control Systems I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course introduces passive environmental design emphasizing sun, wind, daylight, heat flow, insulation/mass, visual comfort, thermal comfort, shading, climate, natural ventilation. The course uses ecotect software for thermal analysis.

ARCH 229. Structures I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course begins with the history of building structures, continues by introducing structural behavior, forces and responses in structural systems, and concludes with an introduction to static structural analysis.

ARCH 251. History of Architecture I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: HUM 101. Introduces architectural history, theory and design, providing a conceptual framework for looking at the built environment. This course introduces key architectural concepts beginning with the earliest examples of human occupation, the shaping of space, and the transformation of natural landscape. Its geographic scope is global and its chronological scope ranges from prehistory to the middle ages.

ARCH 252. History of Architecture II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 251. This survey of the social, political, technological, functional, and aesthetic concerns of architectue, urban forms, and built and natural landscapes is a continuation of ARCH 251. It covers the period from the 15th century to 1900 in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, and Asia. Among its emphases are the impact and significance of absolutism, colonialism, nationalism, humanism, the enlightenment, industrialization and modernity.

ARCH 263. Architecture Studio I. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisite: ARCH 164. Utilizing knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Design I and II, students learn about architectural design. Examination of the technological, social and environmental issues as they relate to architectural design. Lecture hour used to explore in-depth aspects of architecture.

ARCH 264. Architecture Studio II. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisite: ARCH 263. A continuation of ARCH 263. Lecture hour used to explore in-depth aspects of architectural design.

ARCH 282. Structural Principles. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Introduces structural statics through timber and steel design. Influences of materials and structural system choice analyzed relative to their impact on building design. Responsibilities of the architect during the structural design phase are introduced.

ARCH 283. Special Topics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Investigation of problem of special interest in architecture.

ARCH 301. Digital Modeling and Fabrication. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The seminar in Digital Modeling and Fabrication is a 3-credit course for upper level students exploring advanced 3-dimensional computer modeling techniques and data export for assembly and fabrication to various computer numerically controlled (CNC) hardware available at the School of Architecture. Specifically, students engage in NURBS and solid modeling using Rhinoceros 3D and export data through various Rhino plug-ins including RhinoCAM, which writes G- and M- Codes for 2 and 3D milling operations. CNC hardware available as of Spring 2010 includes two (2) Universal Laser Cutters, each with 18" x 32" beds; two (2) Z-Corporation Z-310 3 dimensional printers; and a Precix 9100 Industrial CNC Router with a 48" x 96" bed. Students model and fabricate full scale assemblies individually and in teams and contribute to a final exhibition of student work. Familiarity with various software tools available at the College of Architecture and Design is encouraged but not required. Admission to the course to students in their second year of study by discretion of instructor.

ARCH 310. Co-op Work Experience I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Restriction: completion of the third year studio class, approval of the school and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. A designated faculty member monitors and evaluates the student's work and project. Requirements include mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report and/or project. Apply in third year.

ARCH 312. Environmental Education I. 3 credits, 5 contact hours (2;3;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 264. Involves architecture students in working with grade school or high school students in the solution of a joint environmental design project. Participants first work toward developing their own understanding and sensitivity of the manmade environment. Emphasis on learner-directed and discovery-guided inquiry, and educational methods to increase awareness of the physical settings created for human activities. Projects developed in nearby schools which focus on the interaction of individuals and small groups with the environment.

ARCH 316. Computer Applications to Architecture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Introduces both philosophical and technical approaches to the use of the computer in architectural design and analysis. Explores the use of existing computer programs for spatial allocation, energy analysis, life cycle costing, problem analysis, and computer simulation. Projects include development of computer programs applicable to architecture.

ARCH 317. Advanced Architectural Graphics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 264. Gives students advanced techniques for architectural expression in traditional media. Emphasis on how drawing may be used to reveal the inner qualities of design. A basic knowledge of drawing methods, media, materials, and projection techniques is assumed.

ARCH 323. Construction II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 223. This course surveys enclosure joints and assemblies, including roofing, insulation, doors, windows, glass and hybrid systems. It also focuses on interior and exterior finishes and their construction methodology and documentation, including Building Information Modeling (BIM).

ARCH 327. Environmental Control Systems II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 227. This course focuses on active mechanical systems related to environmental controls including HVAC, plumbing, electrical and alternative energy systems. Additional areas covered include, elevators, electric lighting and acoustics. The course continues the use of ecotect software as an analytical tool.

ARCH 329. Structures II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 229. This course examines lateral forces, foundations, stability, deflection, long spans and special case structural systems. Methodology involves advanced static structural analysis.

ARCH 331. Landscape Architecture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

An overview of the opportunities and constraints of landscape designs. Emphasis on developing a practical understanding of the potentials of earth, water and plants in architecture. Students given an overview of social and ecological determinants of relations between land and buildings.

ARCH 332. Architecture: Image and Word I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course will present films on Architecture in which architects are speaking about and showing their own work. What we think is true about architecture is often wrong. Single images tend to abstract and greatly simplify why and how great architecture is created. Rarely are buildings seen in their content. Rarely are climatic, cultural and technical issues of design illustrated. AS a result, we often speculate about architecture based upon superficial or incomplete information.

ARCH 333. Architecture: Image and Word II. 3 credits, 5 contact hours (2;3;0).

This course will present films on Architecture in which architects are speaking about and showing their own work. Theoreticians provide "facts" to create a unified theory of design, which may lie outside the realm of historical reality, or the intention of the architect. The culture of architectural education and the nature of the design studio results in second hand knowledge, and design myth. Surveys of modern architecture leave a fragmentary memory of great works of architecture.

ARCH 334. Color Theory/Electronic Color. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

The multiple-media course includes lectures with supplemental readings, videos, in-class analysis and laboratory work, and homework requiring a variety of media including watercolor and computer graphics - all of which address a range of issues including interaction of color, psychology of color, design for color deficient vision, color mixing and color palettes, color reproduction, color models, color composition in art and architecture, and others. Digital applications are integrated throughout.

ARCH 335. Digital Tectonics. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course uses 3D modeling tools to investigate the relationship of digital models to physical construction. The term digital tectonics refers to an idea regarding the qualities of works of contemporary architecture that seem to be influenced by the use of digital tools. In this course, students are asked to investigate this hypothesis by testing structure, skin, assemblage, form and space making methodologies that are aided by digital tools and rationalized through digital operations.

ARCH 337. Building Information Modeling. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

This course explores both technical and philosophical approaches to the use of the computer in architectural analysis, design development, information management, and document delivery. Autodesk Building Systems and Autodesk Revit Building will be used for 3D modeling and 2D documentation employing a systems-approach framework for spatial allocation, energy analysis, and structural considerations. The workings of the foundational information databases of the respective software will be thoroughly explored. Projects requirements will include building program resolution, solar analysis, asset scheduling, document layout, and design visualization. Proficiency with Autodesk Autocad (2D) and understanding of general CAD principles are required prerequisites; the formal prerequisite course is ARCH 316/647.

ARCH 361. Project Based Seminar I. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequistes: Junior Status The Project Based Seminar is the first of two seminars required for completion of the Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree. The sequence of seminars teams advanced students from varying academic backgrounds to take on real-life projects in an experiential learning setting. As part of final deliverables, student teams make presentations and submit hardcopy proposals to interested constituencies.

ARCH 363. Architecture Studio III. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisite: ARCH 264, ARCH 223, ARCH 227 and ARCH 229. This course is a continuation of ARCH 264. Lecture hour explores the nature of technology, environment, and social order as they relate to studio work. Course materials purchase required.

ARCH 364. Architecture Studio IV. 5 credits, 13 contact hours (0;0;13).

Prerequisites: ARCH 363. A continuation of ARCH 363. Lecture hour explores in depth the nature of technology, environment, and social order as they relate to studio work. Students will be required to purchase course materials.

ARCH 381. History of Architecture III. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 252. A continuation of ARCH 252, this course surveys global developments in architecture, urban planning, and landscape design in the first half of the 20th century. It examines the continued architectural impact of industrialization and modernization and the geo-political consequences of World War I and World War II on the built environment. The focus is on the development and diffusion of modernism and its relationship to such key concepts as universalism, regionalism, historicism, and utopia.

ARCH 382. History of Architecture IV. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 381. The last in the sequence of history surveys, this course examines global developments in modern and contemporary architecture and urbanism after World War II and into the 21st century. Social uprisings, economic recessions, post-colonialism, modernization in the developing world, mass production and mass consumption, environmentalism, sustainability, and the computer revolution of the information age provide the historical and cultural framework for the course. The course pays particular attention to early extensions and critiques of modernism, the emergence of postmodernism and current efforts to reevaluate modernism's legacy.

ARCH 408. Advanced Landscape Architecture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Introduces the design, construction and management of contemporary landscape projects through case studies, field trips, and personal contact with prominent practicing landscape architects. A historical perspective of landscape architecture is used as a context for discussion.

ARCH 410. Co-op Work Experience II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).

Prerequisites: ARCH 310 or approval of the school and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience. A designated faculty member monitors and evaluates the student's work and project. Requirements include mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report and/or project.

ARCH 419. Architectural Photography. 3 credits, 4 contact hours (2;2;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 364. This course is designed for architecture students in using photography to better visualize form in space in a 2-D format, lighting, color, and composition. The course goal is developing their unique expressive abilities in seeing through the camera. Discussions emphasize correlating historical movements in architecture and the visual arts in photography, using relevant text selections, slide presentations, and museum visits for reinforcement.

ARCH 423. Construction III. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 323. This course focuses on non-normative systems, hybrid and integrated assemblies and new materials. An emphasis is placed on systems integration, materials selection, specifications and construction documents associated with the comprehensive design of buildings using Building Information Modeling (BIM).

ARCH 429. Structures III. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 329. This course focuses on wood systems analysis, steel systems analysis, indeterminate systems and integrated structural systems. Methodology involves finite member analysis.

ARCH 432. P3 Post Presentation Processing. 3 credits, 5 contact hours (2;3;0).

The project is deemed Architecture, with a capital A, but there remains nagging questions: What would the project be like if viewed stereoscopically? If it were rendered as a 360 degree panoramic view, what would the space be like? If it was accurately superimposed into the site (lighting, color, texture, camera angle), does the design improve when in the context? Would rendering styles using "natural media" be more descriptive? What would the architecture be like at night?.

ARCH 461. Project Based Seminar II. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Prerequisites:Junior status The Project Based Seminar II is the second of two seminars required for completion of the Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree. The sequence of seminars teams advanced students from varying academic backgrounds to take on real-life projects in an experiential learning setting. As part of final deliverables, student teams make presentations and submit hardcopy proposals to interested constituencies.

ARCH 463. Option Studio 1. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Studio methodology allows the students to select from various building programs, the nature of design dealing with technology, environment and the social order. Lecture hour coordinates with studio subject matter. Course materials purchase required.

ARCH 464. Option Studio II. 5 credits, 12 contact hours (0;0;12).

Prerequisite: ARCH 463. Studio methodology allows students to select from various building programs, the nature of design dealing with technology, environment and the social order.

ARCH 472. Architectural Programming and Project Development. 3 credits, 0 contact hours (0;0;0).

Prerequisite: ARCH 264. Covers the essentials for programming a building and understanding the full scope of project development that precedes and follows the programming phase. Identify major stakeholders in the building design and production process and examine their roles. Lectures and assignments include: user requirements and client values, methods of pro forma analysis for project development and approval, and how the development process changes over time.

ARCH 483. ST:. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (3;0;0).

Group investigation of problem of special interest in architecture.

ARCH 491. Independent Study. 1 credit, 1 contact hour (0;0;1).

ARCH 493. Independent Study. 3 credits, 3 contact hours (0;0;3).