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Science, Technology and Society :   Offered by the Department of Humanities. See Humanities course list for faculty.
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

STS 100 - Social Science and CSLA Research (3-0-3)
This course introduces the content and methodologies of CSLA disciplines, provides examples of research problems through the lens of the social sciences and gives students an understanding of each major and an overview of the social, historical, and ethical influences on contemporary sciences, and the changing relationships among science, technology and culture. Each week CSLA researchers lecture on applied approaches to problem solving in their domains. Effective From: Fall 2010

STS 101 - Foundations of Science, Technology and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary study of science, technology and society. Through a combination of lectures by the STS teaching staff and external speakers, as well as classic and contemporary readings and case studies that exemplify the field's core content, students examine the social, aesthetic, environmental, economic and political constructs that contextualize the development and proliferation of mechanical and digital technologies with which we interact. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 201 - Understanding Technological Society (3-0-3)
A problem-centered and task-oriented course that integrates social science theory and practice into the leading public issues of a technological society. Students learn critical thinking through hands-on assignments. The course emphasizes student understanding of social institutions that directly affect technological development and professional careers. Effective From: Spring 2012

STS 210 - General Psychology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and STS 201 with a grade of C or better. Introduction to the study of human behavior. Topics include motivation, perception, learning, cognitive development, personality and emotion, individual difference, and biological basis of behavior, as well as methodology in psychological research. Effective From: Spring 2012

STS 221 - Sociology (3-0-3)
An examination of modern society and culture, analyzing the forces for stability and change. Topics covered include the individual and society (socialization, conformity, alienation, and class structure), social institutions (religion, law, education, family, state), social processes (conflicts and harmony, cohesion and dissolution, power, authority, and revolution), urbanization, industrialization, and technological change. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 257 - Technology, Society and Culture: An American View (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. This course will examine several key cases in the way technology fits into society. The politics, sociology, and ethics of technological development will be investigated. Topics include several significant advances of the twentieth century: nuclear warfare, fast food, the simplicity movement, and futuristic enhancement. What do all these things have to do with one another? Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 258 - Technology, Society and Culture: A Global View (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. This course will investigate the issues and problems inherent in the globalization of technology and culture at the beginning of this new millennium. Countries and economies are becoming more entwined in each others identities and economies, and cultural diversity is both threatened and proliferating at one and the same time. How much can the world's markets continue to grow and connect? How does the spread of information change what we know about one another? Should we be afraid of progress? Does the world understand the United States? Do we understand the world? How can "Growth" or "development" be sustained? How can we guide its change? Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 300 - Legal Reasoning, Writing, and Technology (3-0-3 )
Prerequisite: HUM 101. Integrates the process of legal research and fundamentals of legal writing with analysis of law. Focuses upon legal reasoning through analysis of fact and upon the logic of law in judicial opinions, statutory construction, and constitutional interpretation as contemporary issues are analyzed. Effective From: Summer 2011

STS 301 - Independent Study (1 credit)
Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. Consists of self-paced study on an individual or small group basis in a specific area integral to a student's STS concentration but not available on a regular course basis. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 302 - Independent Study (2 credits)
Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. See STS 301. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 303 - Independent Study (3 credits)
Prerequisites: junior standing in the STS program and written approval of the program director. See STS 301 Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 304 - Writing about Science, Technology and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Develop abilities to write lucidly and speak forcefully about the interrelationship of science, technology and society. Learn to articulate a sense of purpose in order to choose the appropriate methods for reporting issues in a technological society. Effective development and transfer of technical knowledge in a complex world. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 305 - Engineers in Society (2-1-2)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Corequisite: CoE 394 with a grade of C or better. For students majoring in computer engineering. The professional aspects of an engineering career. Topics include ethics and responsibility, the role of the professional society, the importance of communication, and the realities of the workplace. Certain writing projects are correlated with the linked lab CoE 394. Field studies of working engineers are conducted by student teams. Co-listed as CoE 301. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2013

STS 306 - American Mosaic: Understanding Cultural Diversity (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of multiculturalism in the United States. The course provides students with a methodological framework for understanding cultural diversity in the United States and around the world. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 307 - Fundamentals of Research in STS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Focuses on research methods in the field of science, technology and society. Focuses on the following methods: problem statement and hypothesis formulation; research design in science, technology and society; data sources; and data acquisition and analysis. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 308**** - Technology and Global Development: Introduction to STS (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Introduces the important public issues that technology brings to the modern world, such as energy development and environmental pollution. Emphasizes the close connections between science and technology, social institutions, and cultural values. Also analyzes today's "global village", the changing relations between East and West and the Third World, and worldwide development and environmental issues. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 309 - Advocacy and the Law (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Eng 300, SS 300 both with a grade of C or better. Offers opportunities to explore the retrieval and use of legal and law-related materials while developing skills in oral advocacy and in writing persuasive legal documents, such as motion memoranda and briefs. Includes learning to listen to participants in the legal process as well as developing effective styles and forms of speech in the classroom. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 310**** - Technology and Human Values (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Examines the interactions between science, technology and human values. Specifically, explores psychological, moral, and philosophical consequences of, and humanistic responses to, technological change. Readings, essays, fiction, and research articles treat such topics as the philosophical foundations of modern science, scientism, technicism; the impact of technology on images of man found in modern literature; and the moral implications of various kinds of recent technology. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 311 - Co-op Work Experience I (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of the sophomore year, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated and approved by the Co-op Office. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a -report. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 312**** - Technology and Policy in Contemporary America (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. A study of technology and politics in recent America. Focuses on the role of the federal government in shaping technology, especially through funding technological innovations and applications. Topics will include the origins of technology policy in World War II, the influence of the Cold War, the science and technology policy advisory system, and political and cultural influences on technology policy. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 313**** - Environmental History and Policy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Covers the rise of the modern environmental debate, and examines its current priorities and values, politics and economics, and impacts on industry and society. Students review the role of regulatory agencies, private industry, public interest groups, and the media. Current major issues in New Jersey are considered, as well as environmental debate on a national and global level. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 316 - Mass Communications, Technology and Culture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Uses the tools of the humanities and social sciences to study the interplay between technology and mass culture. Focuses on motion pictures, electronic music, and television as both technologies and as forms of art. Devotes special attention to the portrayal of science and technology in the media. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 318 - Educational Media Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: IT 201. Educational Media Design employs the instructional principles of constructivist pedagogy as the process used to develop a solution to develope courseware for K-12 audience. The course builds on the participatory design model of software engineering in order to develop integrated learning environments that support visual and verbal literacy; enables student to be able to plan, organize, and systematically develop instructional materials. This course implements instructional design theory and pedagogy in order to create an actual application for a computer-based environment. Same as IT 380. Effective From: Fall 2009

STS 320 - Global Evolution of Scientific Thought I: Case Studies from Antiquity through the 19th Century (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Traces the global development of scientific ways of thinking and demonstrates how scientific ideas, methods, and theories both reflect and influence thought in other areas. Special emphasis is on the biographical approach to scientific innovation through analysis of key figures in relation to the societies in which they lived. Attention is paid to the roles of class and gender in scientific practice. Begins with the study of science in the ancient nations of Babylonia, China, and India and ends with an examination of the rise of scientific approaches to social problems in the nineteenth century. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 321 - Global Evolution of Scientific Thought II: 20th-Century Case Studies (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. A continuation of STS 320, traces the global development of scientific ways of thinking and demonstrates how scientific ideas, methods, and theories both reflect and influence thought in other areas. Begins with the study of Einstein, continues with an analysis of United States and Soviet relations during the Cold War, and concludes with an examination of trends in today's global scientific community. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 325-329 - Special Topics in Science, Technology and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An in-depth examination of a current STS issue. A new topic is addressed each time the course is offered. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 330 - The Professional Engineer: History and Context (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of the origins of modern engineering and the context in which engineering has developed. The course includes an analysis of the contemporary engineering culture?its structure and the values which drive it. The student will be expected to confront both the constraints and opportunities presented by the professional world of engineering. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 331 - Teaching in Urban Schools (3-0-3)
This course introduces students to critical issues of teaching in urban schools. Readings and seminar discussions will focus on: the urban setting, children's lives in the inner city, urban schools, teachers' experiences in urban schools, the classroom, the curriculum, culturally responsive pedagogy, special education in the urban context, bilingual education, immigrant children in American schools, and Newark as an example of some of the topics studied in the course. Effective From: Fall 2007 Until: Fall 2007

STS 333 - Science LIteracy and Pedagogy (3-0-3)
This course investigates the principles of scientific literacy for the general public and how it can be achieved. Particular attention is paid to identifying a personal pedagogy, method of teaching, and how this can be capitalized upon to assist others to become more scientifically literate and aware. Effective From: Fall 2007

STS 335 - ICT in Secondary Schools (3-0-3)
This course examines the integration of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into instruction to foster community, collaboration, conceptual development, and exceptional academic performance. The course pays particular attention to present and potential access and academic uses of ICT in under-resourced urban schools with racially, ethnically, and linguistically diverse students whose families tend not to be participants in the US society's culture of power. Effective From: Fall 2007

STS 337 - Obstacle to Understanding Science and Technology (3-0-3)
This course examines the scientific disciplines typically taught to primary and secondary school children as part of standards-based education in America. It seeks to identify those factual inaccuracies, misconceptions, and other incorrect notions held by students-up-to and through college. Methods for identifying and overcoming incorrect notions will be presented. Effective From: Fall 2007

STS 338 - Paradigm Shifts in Science, Technology and Society (3-0-3)
This course examines how to approach, discuss and debate controversial issues in science and technology in order to facilitate civil discourse and policy-formation in a democratic society. Various types of controversies will be addressed illustrating various aspects of debate and discourse needed to arrive at compromise, understanding, and consensus. Students will learn how to moderate group discussion dealing with current science and technology issues facing society and learn to moderate discussions for themselves and for others. Effective From: Fall 2007

STS 339 - Philosophy and Psychology of Race and Gender (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210, each with a grade of C or better. Course examines the psychological elements of prejudice, with emphasis on racial cognition and gender bias. Topics covered include the history of essentialism about race and gender; implicit bias; stereotype threat; interventions against biased attitudes; and ethics of race and gender bias. Readings from contemporary philosophy and psychology. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 340 - Multiculturalism in a Technological Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Explores the roles of culture and ethnicity in our increasingly technological and global society. The interplay between scientific developments and the specific sociocultural contexts is addressed. Specific case studies from various countries are explored, covering differing levels of technological achievement. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to competently analyze the interaction between a country's scientific development and its political and sociological climate. Special topics are negotiated with students at the start of each class, with the goal of covering all continents and a variety of scientific fields. At least one case study each semester carefully reviews multiculturalism in the American technological culture. Emphasis also is given to the particular roles and responsibilities of the United States as a technological and political leader. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 342 - Women in Technological Culture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Takes an interdisciplinary and multicultural approach to issues of gender in science and technology. The issues include the current status and problems of women in non-traditional professions; the historical contributions of women in science and technology; images of women in Western and non-Western cultures; theories of gender difference, past and present; the impact of cultural gender coding on the epistemologies of science and technology; women and Third World development. Course materials include case studies and autobiographical narratives, films, and science fiction as well as historical and sociological analyses. Expressive student writing and group projects are encouraged. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 344 - Communications Policy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Study of communication environments and developing communications technologies as central elements of evolving political and social systems. Analysis of philosophical, military, economic, and technical premises for communications policy and the process of regulation. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 346 - Pragmatism and Technology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Examines the relationship between the American philosophy of pragmatism and the role of technology in the contemporary world. How do philosophical ideas affect the development of technology and science? How has pragmatism shaped the current view of the meaning and value of technological progress? Readings from both the traditional authors of American pragmatism?Peirce, James, and Dewey?and contemporary texts. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 347 - Introduction to Music (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: HUM 101 with a grade of C or better. This course is an introduction to the history of music, from ancient to present times, Western, Eastern, folk, world, classical, jazz, rock, and electronic. The class aims to develop in the student an informed and critical ear to make sense of the vast array of music available to our ears today. We also cover how technology has transformed how we experience and create music, from the development of the piano to the computer. The course involves extensive music listening and writing about music. It is a prerequisite for the hands-on electronic music classes that NJIT offeres, STS 349 and STS 325. Effective From: Fall 2012

STS 348 - Esthetics and Modern Technology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. The central focus of this course is on the changing conception of beauty as influenced by technological development, especially in twentieth-century United States society. The course examines how technology is echoed in art and philosophy, and how they, in turn, influence future technological considerations. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 349 - Advanced Music Technology (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: STS 347. Students will learn the basics of notebook computer-based music composition and production. Emphasis will be on composition and making of music, learning the aesthetics necessary to get the most out of your machine. Course will require extensive work on your own home computer. Computer requirements: A PC or Macintosh system running Ableton Live. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 350 - Computers and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, one SS course, completion of a 100-level GUR course in CS, all with a grade of C or better. Examines the historical evolution of computer and information systems and explores their implications in the home, business, government, medicine, and education. Topics include auto-mation and job impact, privacy, and legal and ethical issues. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 351 - Minds and Machines (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210, each with a grade of C or better. An introduction to the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Topics covered include the computational theory of mind; artificial intelligence; connectionism; embodied theory of mind; and dynamical theories of mind. Readings from recent and contemporary philosophy, psychology and computer science. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 358 - Moral Psychology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: STS 201 and STS 210 each with a grade of C or better. An introduction to moral philosophy with emphasis on the biological and psychological mechanisms underlying moral thought, judgment an action. Topics covered include altruism and egoism; utilitarianism, deontology and virtue ethics; the situationist critique of character; and agency and responsibility. Readings draw from classical and contemporary philosophers as well as from current empirical psychology. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 359 - Cyberpsychology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 102 with a grade of C or better and STS 201 or STS 210 or equivalent with a grade of C or better. Introduction to the study of the effects of the internet and cyberspace on the psychology of individuals and groups. Some topics covered include: online identity, online relationships, personality types in cyberspace, transference to computers, addiction to computers and the internet, regressive behavior in cyberspace, online gender-switching, etc. Effective From: Spring 2012

STS 360**** - Ethics and the Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. An analysis of the ethical presuppositions and value principles underlying environmental policy. The study of ethical theories and their application to the environmental crisis. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 362**** - Environmental Economics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, EPS 202, Econ 201 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Presents a detailed overview of the relationship between political economy and the environment. Draws on diverse case studies including global warming, harvesting of minerals on the ocean's floor, destruction of old growth forests, and contamination of the -nation's water, air, and soils. Explores the economic remedies to the fast-changing relationship between society and nature. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 363 - Introduction to Sustainability Studies (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: STS 201 and EPS 202, each with a grade of C or better. The course introduces students to sustainability studies, examines the roots of the concept, and explores its roles as feature of international politics. Particular attention is devoted to the economically, advanced nations and the challenges of planning for a more sustainable future. The course also considers how the sustainability agenda is likely to evolve in an era of climate change and biophysical constraints. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 364 - Sustainability Policy and Practice (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: STS 201, EPS 202 and STS 363, each with a grade of C or better. Formulation of effective sustainability policies requires appreciation of the linkages between conceptual understanding and empirical practice. The course highlights the macroeconomic drivers of contemporary sustainability challenges. Topics discussed include efficiency improvements, economic relocalization, green consumerism, and efforts to build a green economy. Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 378 - Literature and Nature (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Literature reveals and interprets the natural world. Students examine the ways that nature has been used in non-fiction and fiction. Students also learn the challenge of describing the natural world in their own words. Representative writers include Percy Shelley, Henry David Thoreau, Octavio Paz, Denise Levertov, Gary Snyder, Joyce Carol Oates, and Annie Dillard. Co-listed as Lit 378. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 380 - Policy Issues in the Coastal Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An examination of coastal environments from the standpoint of the scientist, the engineer, and the resource manager. Topics include beach and shoreline characteristics, technological innovations to address coastal erosion problems, and current debates in coastal policy and resource management. Case studies are used to illustrate coastal management practices and the scientific, technical, and social constraint to policy formulation. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 381 - Field Techniques and Research Methods (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. An introduction to research methods. The objectives of the course are to provide opportunity to pursue specialized, in-depth research in a subfield of science, technology and society of the student's choice; to develop skills in problem identification, research design and problem solving; to increase familiarity with methods of data analysis; to strengthen library research skills; to provide an opportunity to gather original field data in a team-oriented environment; and to improve oral and written communication skills. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 382 - Geographical Perspectives on the Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. EPS 202 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better. Designed to introduce students to the field of geography. Focuses on the natural processes that sculpt the physical and biological terrain, and the environmental interrelationships between human societies and nature. Combining physical, human and environmental perspectives on the earth's surface, explores, in depth, topics such as famine, societal response to natural and technological hazards, and water issues in the United States. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 411 - Co-op Work Experience II (3 credits)
Prerequisites: STS 311 or its equivalent with a grade of C or better, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and/or project. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

STS 490**** - Project and Seminar I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: senior standing in the STS program. Each student undertakes a comprehensive study of an issue in science technology and human affairs. The solution requires application of knowledge and skills acquired in course work, self-study, and library research as well as consultation with persons in the academic community, industry, and government. The completed study is submitted as a detailed written report. The seminar meets weekly. Speakers from education, government, and industry address themselves in topics of current interest to STS students. Effective From: Spring 2009

STS 491**** - Project and Seminar II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: STS 490. A continuation of STS 490. Effective From: Spring 2009





**** Special Honors sections are available; permission of Honors College or Humanities Department required.