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Physics:   Offered by the Physics Departments of NJIT and Rutgers-Newark
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Phys 102 - General Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. Intended for students in architecture, computer science (B.A. only), STS and other disciplines requiring laboratory science electives. Elementary statics and dynamics. Subjects discussed are kinematics, Newton's laws of motion, energy, momentum, conservation principles, and mechanical properties of matter. Lab must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 102A - General Physics Laboratory (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: None. This course is the laboratory component of Phys 102 and must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 103 - General Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 102 with grade of C or better. A continuation of Phys 102 for students in architecture, computer science (B.A. only), STS and other disciplines requiring laboratory science electives. Topics discussed are heat, thermodynamics, sound, wave motion, illumination, geometric and physical optics, and color. Lab must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 103A - General Physics Laboratory (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: Phys 102 with grade of C or better. This course is the laboratory component of Phys 103 and must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 105 - Physics A (3-0-3)
Corequisite: Math 108. First semester of a two-semester sequence with Phys 106. The sequence is equivalent to Phys 111. Placement is determined by performance on standardized entrance examinations. A study of elementary mechanics with emphasis on the fundamental laws of mechanics and conservation laws. Topics include scalar and vector quantities, rectilinear motion, equilibrium and Newton's laws of motion, friction, work and energy, impulse, and momentum. Lab must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2011

Phys 105A - Physics A Laboratory (0-2-1)
Corequisite: Math 108. Placement in this course is determined by performance on standardized entrance examinations. This course is the laboratory component of Phys 105 and must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2011

Phys 105W - Physics A Workshop (0-1-0)
Corequisite: Math 108. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2011

Phys 106 - Physics B (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 105 and Math 108 or Math 109 or Math 110, with grade of C or better. Second semester of a two-semester sequence with Phys 105. An extension of Phys 105 in the area of mechanics. Topics include rotational motion, torque, inertia and angular momentum, static equilibrium, gravity, and a full review of mechanics at the level equivalent to Phys 111. Lab must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 106A - Physics B Laboratory (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: same as Phys 106. This course is the laboratory component of Phys 106 and must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2011

Phys 111 - Physics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Corequisite: Math 111. Elementary mechanics with an emphasis on the fundamental concepts and laws of mechanics, especially the conservation laws. Topics are scalar and vector quantities of mechanics; rectilinear and circular motion; equilibrium and Newton's laws of motion; work, energy, momentum; the conservation laws. Lab must be taken concurrently. See Phys 111A. Effective From: Spring 2014

Phys 111A - Physics I Laboratory (0-2-1)
Corequisite: Math 111. Laboratory component of Phys 111 and Phys 111H. Lab must be taken concurrently with Phys 111 or Phys 111H. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 111H - Honors Physics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Math 131; Corequisite: Math 111 or Math 111H or Math 132. Admission to this course is by invitation, based on class standing and standardized entrance exams. First semester of a three-semester program in Honors Physics. Covers the material in Phys 111, but topics are treated more comprehensively and in greater depth. More extensive use of mathematics. Lab must be taken concurrently. See Phys 111A. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 111W - Physics I Workshop (0-1-0)
Corequisite: Math 111 or Math 111H. Workshop for Phys 111. Effective From: Spring 2009 Until: Fall 2011

Phys 114 - Introduction to Data Reduction with Applications (3-0-3)
Corequisite: Math 111. Physics majors only. An introduction to both the theory and application of error analysis and data reduction methodology. Topics include the binomial distribution and its simplification to Gaussian and Poisson probability distribution functions, estimation of moments, and propagation of uncertainty. Forward modeling, including least-squares fitting of linear and polynomial functions are discussed. The course enables students to apply the concepts of the data reduction and error analysis using data analysis software to real data sets found in the physical sciences. Effective From: Spring 2014

Phys 121 - Physics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: PHYS 111 with a grade of C or better. Math 111 or 111H. Co-requisite: Math 112. This course deals with an introduction to electricity and magnetism. Topics include simple dc circuits, the electric field, the magnetic field, electric potential, capacitance relationships between electric and magnetic fields, inductance, and simple ac circuits. Lab must be taken concurrently. See Phys 121A. Effective From: Spring 2014

Phys 121A - Physics II Laboratory (0-2-1)
Prerequisites: Phys 111 or Phys 111H or Phys 106 and Math 111 or Math 111H all with grade of C or better. Corequisite: Math 112. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 121H - Honors Physics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: PHYS 111 with a grade of C or better. Math 111 or 111H or 132. Co-requisite: Math 112 or Math 133. This is the second semester of a three-semester program in Honors Physics. The course covers the material given in Phys 121. Greater use is made of vector analysis. In addition, an introduction to Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic field and their application to physical problems is given. Lab must be taken concurrently.See Phys 121A. Effective From: Spring 2012

Phys 202 - Introductory Astronomy and Cosmology (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. A non-mathematical presentation of contemporary views of the origin, evolution, and structure of the solar system, stars, galaxies, and the universe. Special topics include neutron stars, black holes, gravitationally strange objects, and the ?big bang.? Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 202A - Astronomy and Cosmology Laboratory (0-2-1)
Corequisite: Phys 202. Includes demonstration of physical principles applicable to astronomy. Use of telescope for lunar, solar and planetary observations. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 203 - The Earth in Space (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. Introduces fundamental phenomena, such as plate tectonics, erosion, volcanism, and glaciation. Studies the interaction between the Earth's four major reservoirs?atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and solid earth; investigates the dependence of the Earth on the Sun; the effect of the Moon on the Earth. Extends knowledge gained from studying the Earth to other planets in this solar system. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 203A - The Earth in Space Laboratory (0-2-1)
Corequisite: Phys 203. Optional laboratory course associated with Phys 203. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 204 - Biophysics of Life (3-0-3)
A non-mathematical view of how living entities work in terms of the basic concepts of physics. The course will discuss how these concepts underline topics ranging from birth to death, from touch to pleasure, from vision to beauty, and from a thought to a heartbeat. Effective From: Fall 2013

Phys 231A - Physics III Laboratory (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: Phys 121 or Phys 121H and Math 112 or Math 112H, all with grade of C or better. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 231H - Honors Physics III (4-0-4)
Prerequisite: Phys 121 or Phys 121H and Math 112 or Math 112H, all with grade of C or better. Third semester of a three-semester program in Honors Physics. Physical optics is treated in greater detail. Modern physics includes a greater number of topics, with special emphasis on the wave-particle duality in nature. Lab must be taken concurrently. See Phys 231A. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 233 - Physics III (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 121. Intended for students in chemical engineering only. Topics include elements of simple harmonic motion, wave motion, interference and diffraction, quantum mechanics, semiconductor models, carrier distribution, Fermi functions, and selected topics. Effective From: Spring 2002 Until: Spring 2008

Phys 234 - Physics III (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Math 112 or Math 112H. Elements of simple harmonic motion, wave motion, geometric and physical optics are considered. The wave and particle duality of nature is emphasized and made plausible by an examination of the important experiments and theories which lead to the modern concepts of matter and radiation. The conservation laws are broadened to include the equivalence of mass and energy. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 234H - Honors Physics III (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Math 112 or Math 112H. Third semester of a three-semester program in Honors Physics. Physical optics is treated in greater detail. Modern physics includes a greater number of topics, with special emphasis on the wave-particle duality in nature. Lab must be taken concurrently. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 235 - Physics III (4-0-4)
Prerequisites: Phys 121 and 121A. Intended for students in computer engineering. Topics include simple harmonic motion, wave motion, interference and diffraction, photons, electrons, and the wave particle duality. Thermodynamics and heat transfer are introduced. Effective Until: Spring 2008

Phys 310 - Introduction to Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H; Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. Selected topics in atomic physics including the Pauli Exclusion Principle and the Atomic Shell Model. In nuclear physics, the two-body problem, nuclear models, alpha, beta, and gamma radiation, acclerators, and nuclear detectors are studied. 21&62:750:403 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 311 - Co-op Work Experience I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the co-op program. Students gain major-related experience and reinforcement of the academic program. Work assignments are facilitated and approved by the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Participation in seminars and a final report/project is mandatory. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

Phys 320 - Astronomy and Astrophysics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 121 or Phys 121H, with grade of C or better. A quantitative introduction to the astronomy of the sun, earth, and solar system, with an emphasis on the physical principles involved. Includes celestial mechanics, planetary atmospheres and the physics of comets, asteroids and meteorites. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 321 - Astronomy and Astrophysics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 320, with grade of C or better. A quantitative introduction to the astronomy of the stars, the galaxy, and cosmology, with an emphasis on the physical principles involved. Includes stellar interiors, stellar evolution, galactic dynamics, large-scale structure and early history of the universe. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 322 - Observational Astronomy (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 320, with grade of C or better. Most class time is spent in an observatory performing observations of celestial objects such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, stellar clusters, and galaxies. Experimental projects include charting the skies, asterophotography (film and CCD), measuring masses of planets, rotational period of the Sun, topography of the Moon, H-R diagrams of stellar clusters, etc. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 335 - Introductory Thermodynamics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 211 or Math 213 or Math 213H, all with grade of C or better. Corequisites: Math 222, Math 238 or Math 335. Introductory thermodynamics, kinetic theory, statistical physics. Topics include equations of state, the three laws of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes. 21&62:750:315 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 350 - Biophysics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 121 or Phys 121H with a grade of C or better. This course presents an introduction to general biophysics and a preparation for medical school and biotechnology careers. It features molecules, viruses and cells racing to form enormous electric fields, succumbing to diseases and creating life. It explains how key medical devices preserve life. It asses students? progress using questions just like those on the medical school entrance exams and seeks an understanding of a few, simple principles of life science. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 390 - Selected Topics of Current Interest in Physics (1-0-1)
Prerequisite: Phys 234 or Phys 234H, with grade of C or better. Seminar covering topics that are currently in the forefront of physics. The lecture series offers exposure to such topics as nuclear physics, solid state physics, plasma physics, the special and general theories of relativity, and the history and philosophy of science. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 411 - Co-op Work Experience II (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Phys 311, with grade of C or better, and acceptance into the co-op program. Provides for co-op work assignments which must be approved by the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Participation in seminars and a final -report/project are mandatory. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

Phys 418 - Fundamentals of Optical Imaging (2-2-3)
Prerequisites: Phys234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H, with grade of C or better. This is a course with both lectures and experiments and the emphasis is on the hands-on experiences. Upon completion of the course, students should not only grasp the basic concepts involved in imaging science, but also be able to work on simple real world imaging systems. The main content of the lecture part of this course can be summarized as the following: Optical sources, detectors and their working mechanism; Image formation and transmission; Optical imaging system and their characteristics; Imaging processing and algorithms. This course is developed in close collaboration with Edmund Optics Inc. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 420 - Special Relativity (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. An introduction to Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity at the advanced undergraduate level. Topics include invariance of the speed of light, relativity of time and space, the Lorentz transformations, space-time diagrams, the twin paradox and time travel, relativistic mechanics, rotating reference frames, laser gyroscopes, superluminal motion, phase and group velocities, and applications in high-energy physics, relativistic engineering, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 421 - General Relativity (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. An introduction to Einstein's General Theory of Relativity at the advanced undergraduate level. Topics include review of Newton's Theory of Gravitation, review of Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity, tensor calculus on both flat and curved manifolds, the covariant derivative, curvature, Einstein's Gravitational Field Equations, the weak-field limit, gravitational radiation, the black hole solution, Hawking radiation, the No-Hair Theorem, cosmology, and a history of the Universe. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 430 - Classical Mechanics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H and Math 328 or Math 335, all with grade of C or better. Newtonian mechanics of particles and systems. Lagrange's and Hamilton's approaches. Continuous systems. 21&62:750:361 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 431 - Classical Mechanics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 430, with grade of C or better. Theory of small oscillations and mechanical waves. Rigid bodies. Topics include stability, linearization methods, forced vibrators and perturbation theory, fluids and mechanics of continuous media. 21&62:750:362 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 432 - Electromagnetism I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H and Math 328 or Math 335, all with grade of C or better. Electrostatics and magnetostatics, Maxwell's equations with applications, and electrodynamics. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 433 - Electromagnetism II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 432, with grade of C or better. Maxwell's equations with applications and electrodynamics. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 441 - Modern Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. Topics include wave-particle duality, wave mechanics, two-state quantum systems, the motion of an electron in a periodic lattice, band theory of solids, electrical, thermal and magnetic properties of solids, and plasmas and super fluid systems. 21&62:750:316 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 442 - Introduction to Quantum Mechanics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 430, with grade of C or better. Wave-particle duality, the Schrodinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom, perturbation theory, and concepts of degeneracy, composite states and general properties of eigenfunctions. 21&62:750:404 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 443 - Modern Optics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with a grade of C or better. Electromagnetic theory of light, interference, diffraction, polarization, absorption, double refraction, scattering, dispersion, aberration, and an introduction to quantum optics. Other topics include holography, lasers, information retrieval, spatial filtering, and character recognition. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 444 - Fluid and Plasma Dynamics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. Introduces the basics of plasma physics. Covers the following plasma parameters, single particle motions, plasma as fluid, waves, diffusion and resistivity, equilibrium and instability, kinetic theory, nonlinear effects. Applications in three areas: controlled fusion, astrophysics, and interaction between light and plasma. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 446 - Solid State Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Math 222, with grade of C or better. Corequisite: Phys 442. An introduction to modern concepts of the solid state. Topics include crystal structure and diffraction, crystal binding and elastic properties, thermal properties, dielectric phenomena, band theory of solids and Fermi surfaces, electrical conductors, semiconductors, magnetism, and super-conductivity. 21&62:750:406 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 448 - Semiconductor Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. The physics of semiconductors is examined and applied to problems of interest to the engineer. The course includes the following topics: the band theory of solids, conduction in solids, hole and electron statistics, and P-N junction theory with emphasis placed upon low-level and high-level injection. Metal semiconductor contacts and P-N-P transistor theory are also discussed. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 450 - Advanced Physics Laboratory (1-4-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 335, Phys 430, Phys 432, all with grade of C or better. Introduction to electrical measurements; instrumentation; theoretical and applied electronics, solid state electronic devices, digital circuitry; computer design; experiments in modern physics. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 451 - Biophysics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 121 with a grade of C or better. An introduction to electrical aspects of biophysics and a preparation for medical school and biotechnology careers. Covering how medical devices work and using active learning with reports on new research. Effective From: Spring 2013

Phys 452 - Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. Topics include atomic spectra, atomic structure, and nuclear physics. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 456 - Introduction to Solid State Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. Treats the same topics as Phys 446 while introducing the necessary modern physics. Designed for students choosing a minor in applied physics. Students majoring in applied physics are ineligible. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 461 - Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 430, Phys 432, Phys 433, all with grade of C or better. Topics include vector and tensor analysis, matrix methods, complex variables, Sturm-Liouville theory, special functions, Fourier series and integrals, integral equations, and numerical solutions of differential equations. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 480 - Topics in Applied Physics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Current topics and interests in applied physics and physics. Emphasis is on research and scientific development in microelectornics, optoelectronics, optical physics, materials science, surface science, solar physics, and modern physics. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 481 - Applied Solid State Physics: Microelectronics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 446, with grade of C or better. Topics include physics of bipolar and field effect devices, Phonon and optical spectra, unipolar devices, and thermal and high field properties of semiconductor devices. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 482 - Applied Solid State Physics: Microelectronics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 446, with grade of C or better. Topics include large-scale integrated circuits, device characteristics, charge-coupled devices, LED and semiconductor lasers, photodetectors, and electrical and optical properties of materials. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 483 - Applied Solid State Physics (0-6-3)
Prerequisite: Phys 446, with grade of C or better. Introduction to digital concepts; binary circuits and microprocessor architecture. Applications of discrete solid-state devices and integrated circuits are explored both in theory and practice. The laboratory also serves as an introduction to hardware and software components of a typical microcomputer. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 485 - Computer Modeling of Applied Physics Problems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Phys 234 or Phys 234H or Phys 231H and Math 222 or Math 222H, all with grade of C or better. General computer programming modeling methods and techniques. Numerical solutions to integro-differential equations. Eigenvalues problems. Application of computer-aided-design and other packages. 21&62:750:461 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 490 - Independent Study (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Undertake individual research or a project under the supervision of a member of the physics department. 21&62:750:485, 486 may be substituted for this course. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phys 490H - Honors Independent Study (3-0-3)
By arrangement with a physics faculty member. Fulfills Honors College capstone course requirement.

R750:315 - Introductory Thermodynamics (3)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R750:316 - Introduction to Modern Physics (3)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R750:333 - Applications of Mathematics to Physics (3)
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R750:403 - Introduction to Atomic and Nuclear Physics (3)
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R750:404 - Quantum Mechanics (3)
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R750:406 - Introductory Solid-State Physics (3)
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R750:407 - Advanced Physics Laboratory I (1)
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R750:408 - Advanced Physics Laboratory II (1)
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R750:461 - Computational Methods in Applied Physics (3)
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R750:485 - Individual Research in Physics (BA,BA)
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R750:493 - Readings in Physics (BA,BA)
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GRADUATE COURSES:

Phys 555 - Physics Laboratory Techniques (3 credits)
Prerequisite: B.S. or B.A. with course emphasis in a pure science or major engineering discipline. A training workshop in principles in mechanics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion, geometric and physical optics, and modern physics; experiments involving hands-on use of laboratory apparatus to solve numerous practical physics problems.

Phys 593 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience IV (0 credits)
Prerequisites: One immediately prior 3-credit registration for graduate co-op work experience with the same employer. Requires approval of departmental co-op advisor and the Division of Career Development Services. Must have accompanying registration in a minimum of 3 credits of course work. Effective From: Fall 2006

Phys 601 - Mechanics I (3 credits)
Concepts and basic methods for the treatment of equilibrium and accelerated motion; Newton's Laws and the Free Body Diagram applied to problems in statics and dynamics; vectors, vector quantities, and their application in mechanics.

Phys 602 - Mechanics II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Phys 601 or equivalent. Laws of conservation of energy and conservation of momentum in work and energy, power, impulse and momentum, collisions, recoil, and rocket propulsion. Angular motion, torque, moment of inertia, work and energy in rotational motion, and the application of Newton's laws and the law of conservation of angular momentum to problems in rotational dynamics are studied.

Phys 603 - Electricity and Magnetism I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Phys 602 or equivalent. Electric charge, electric field, Gauss's law, electric potential, potential energy difference, current, resistance, and emf are studied. Also considers the law of conservation of charge and Kirchoff's laws, direct current circuits and instrumentation. Class includes demonstration lectures, related supervised computation problems, and recitations.

Phys 604 - Electricity and Magnetism II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Phys 603 or equivalent. Magnetic field, force on moving charges, force on current-carrying conductor, and torque on a current-carrying coil; the Hall effect, magnetic field due to moving changes, induced emf, Faraday's and Lenz's laws, mutual and self-inductance, R-L, L-C, and R-L-C circuits, ferromagnetism and permanent magnets. Also considers alternating currents, circuits with resistance, inductance, and capacitance, average and RMS values, phasors, power, resonance, and transformers. Class includes demonstration lectures, supervised computation problems, and recitation.

Phys 607 - Topics in Astronomy and Cosmology (3 credits)
Prerequisites: college-level physics and mathematics. A survey of recent progress in astronomy, the physical principles involved, and the impact these new discoveries have on our understanding of the universe. Includes results from recent and ongoing planetary probes of our solar system, discovery of planetary systems around other stars, the evolution of stars, exotic objects such as neutron stars and black holes, the formation of galaxies, and current understanding of the birth and final fate of the universe. Observing sessions familiarize students with the sun, moon, and night sky.

Phys 687 - Physics of Materials (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Phys 441 or equivalent (see undergraduate catalog for description). Fundamentals of quantum mechanics; energy bands in crystals; electrical conduction in metals and alloys, semiconductors; optical properties of materials; quantum mechanical treatment of optical properties; magnetic properties of materials; thermal properties, heat capacity, and thermal expansion in solids.

Phys 688 - Mathematical and Statistical Methods in Materials Science (3 credits)
More emphasis on analytical methods and statistics. Course will be required for Ph.D. students in Materials Science. Effective From: Fall 2006

Phys 700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Written approval from graduate advisor. For students admitted to the Master of Science program in applied physics who do not take Phys 701 Master's Thesis. An extensive paper involving experimental or theoretical investigation of a topic in microelectronics or other applied physics area is required. Cooperative projects with industry or government agencies may be acceptable. The project is carried out under the supervision of a designated physics graduate faculty member.

Phys 701 - Master's Thesis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Written approval from graduate advisor. For students admitted to the Master of Science program in applied physics. Experimental or theoretical investigation of a topic in microelectronics or other applied physics area. Cooperative projects with industry or government agencies may be acceptable. The thesis is written under the supervision of a designated physics graduate faculty member. The completed written thesis should be of sufficient merit to warrant publication in a scientific or technical journal. The student must register for a minimum of 3 credits per semester. Degree credit is limited to 6 credits indicated for the thesis.

Phys 721 - Classical Electrodynamics II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Phys 621 or equivalent; basic knowledge of tensor analysis. Simple radiating systems, scattering and diffraction; special theory of relativity; dynamics of relativistic particles and electromagnetic fields; collisions between charged particles, energy loss, and scattering; radiation from accelerated charge, synchrotron radiation, and bremsstrahlung. Effective From: Fall 2009

Phys 725 - Independent Study (3 credits)
Prerequisites: permission from the graduate advisor (not thesis advisor) in Physics, as well as courses prescribed by a supervising faculty member (who is not the student's thesis advisor). This special course covers areas of study in which one or more students may be interested, but which isn't of sufficiently broad interest to warrant a regular course offering. Students may not register for this course more than once with the same supervising faculty member.

Phys 728 - Radio Astronomy (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Phys 621and 641 or the equivalent, or approval of the instructor. An introduction to radio emission processes, radiative transfer, radio diagnostics, and radio instrumentation. Topics include radio flux measurements with single antenna, radio imaging with interferometer arrays ( Fourier Transform imaging), and image reconstruction techniques (CLEAN, MEM). Application is to astronomical objects with special emphasis on the Sun.

Phys 731 - Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Phys 631 or equivalent. Review of quantum mechanics and theory of special relativity; second quantization; relativistic one-particle problem; Klein-Gordon equation and Dirac equation; canonical field theory; relativistic scattering theory; introduction to quantum electrodynamics and quantum field theory; Feynman diagrams and applications. Effective From: Fall 2009

Phys 774 - Fundamentals of Spectroscopy (3 Credits)
The major objectives of this course are to integrate theory and practice and to bring together different branches of Academic Studies and Industrial Research through the presentation of critical aspects of modern Spectroscopy. The course will provide a valuable theoretical introduction and an overview of modern topics in spectroscopy, which are of current interest and importance in Semiconductor Industry and Biomedicine. A wide range of techniques is considered, including optical Near field spectroscopy, X-ray, Raman, Neutron scattering, and FT-IR spectroscopy. Effective From: Fall 2006

Phys 789 - Physics of Advanced Semiconductor Device Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisites: NJIT: EE 657, 26:755:687; or equivalent. Intended for doctoral students in applied physics, electrical engineering, and materials science. (Rutgers = 26:755:789)Silicon and GaAs technologies: crystal growth methods, epitaxy, oxidation, lithography, dry and wet etching techniques, polysilicon, diffusion, ion implantation, metallization (including silicidation), process integration, analytical characterization techniques, assembly and packaging, and yield and reliability. Effective From: Fall 2009

Phys 790 - Doctoral Dissertation and Research (Credits as designated, 1st and 2nd sem.)
Prerequisites: passing grade on departmental qualifying examination and approval of doctoral candidacy. Corequisite: Phys 791. A minimum of 36 credits is required. The student must register for at least 6 credits of dissertation per semester. Registration for additional credits, up to 12 per semester, is permitted with the approval of the department graduate advisor. Experimental or theoretical investigation of a topic in applied physics, including microelectronics, materials science, and laser physics. Cooperative projects with industry or government agencies may be acceptable. Research and writing are carried out under the supervision of a designated graduate faculty member. The completed written dissertation should be a substantial contribution to the knowledge of the topic under research, and should be of sufficient merit to warrant publication in a leading scientific or technical journal.

R755:611 - Advanced Classical Mechanics (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:621 - Classical Electrodynamics (3 credits)
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R755:631 - Quantum Mechanics (3 credits)
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R755:641 - Statistical Mechanics (3 credits)
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R755:651 - Atomic and Molecular Physics (3 credits)
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R755:654 - Nuclear and Particle Physics (3 credits)
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R755:661 - Solid-State Physics (3 credits)
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R755:667 - Modern Experimental Techniques for Materials Processing and Characterization (3 credits)
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R755:671 - Applied Optics (3 credits)
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R755:675 - Cellular Biophysics (3 credits)
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R755:687 - Physics of Materials (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:689 - Simulations of Electronic Device Structures (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:690 - Directed Study of Applied Physics (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:721 - Classical Electrodynamics II (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:731 - Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:732 - General Relativity and Gravitation (3 credits)
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R755:761 - Solid-State Theory (3 credits)
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R755:762 - Electronic Structure of Solids (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R755:763 - Surface and Interface Physics (3 credits)
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R755:771 - Quantum Electronics (3 credits)
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R755:772 - Applied Plasma Physics (3 credits)
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R755:773 - Particle-Solid Interactions (3 credits)
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R755:774 - Principles of Spectroscopy (3 credits)
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R755:775 - Electrical Properties of Polymers (3 credits)
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R755:780 - Current Topics of Applied Physics (3 credits)
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R755:781 - Physics of Advanced Semiconductor Devices (3 credits)
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R755:787 - Physics of Sensors and Actuators (3 credits)
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R755:789 - Physics of Advanced Semiconductor Device Processing (3 credits)
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R755:790 - Doctoral Dissertation (Credits as designated)
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R755:791 - Applied Physics Seminar (Non-credit)
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R755:792 - Pre-Doctoral Research (3 credits)
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