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phil
Philosophy:   Offered by the Department of Humanities. See Humanities course list for faculty.

 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Phil 300 - Philosophy of Law and Social Justice (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Introduction to philosophical issues concerning law, using lectures and case studies. Topics covered will include: the interpretation of legal texts; the foundation of moral obligation to obey the law; the nature of rights; and the function of punishment Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 331 - Problems in Philosophy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An examination of problems of a social, ethical, esthetic, religious, and scientific nature, and a study of the related principles and methods of philosophy. Readings are chosen from a wide range of periods and schools from the Greeks to the present, with some application of philosophical analysis to individual and societal problems. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 333 - Moral Philosophy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A critical discussion of the history and fundamental elements of ethical thought. Examines topics such as the basic ethical theories, the nature of right and wrong, the significance of moral choice, the structure of the moral life, and the place of reason in ethics. Readings from both classical and modern philosophers. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 334 - Engineering Ethics and Technological Practice: Philosophical Perspectives on Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. A philosophical examination of the nature of engineering practice and applied technology. Considers such questions as: How do the societal functions of engineers and the practical application of technologies relate to basic moral and intellectual values? What moral obligations are implied by the uses of technology? What are the ethical duties of engineers in the practice of their careers? How are technological practice and engineering related to questions about knowledge and reality? Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 337 - World Religions (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An introduction to five world religions which make strong claims to be in some sense universal: Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam, with special attention to their impact on contemporary politics, gender, economics, and culture. Study of selected scriptures, major customs, representative figures, and one or two works of art from each religious tradition. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 340 - Ethical Issues in Public Policy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Course premise is the inevitability of ethical issues in public policy decision making. Societal forces such as government, industry, economics, public interest, and science can play various roles in shaping public policy and are related to ethical concerns. Focuses on both historic and current public policy case studies. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 350 - Representative Philosophies (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. The ideas of a few great thinkers, from a variety of historical periods. Shows at first hand how these philosophers accelerated intellectual progress and how their work may contribute to the solution of modern problems. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 351 - Biomedical Ethics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An examination of the ethical problems and moral foundations of medicine. Among the issues explored are the changing nature of the doctor/patient relationship, increased patient autonomy, advance directives, the rationing of care, doctor-assisted suicide, and "the right to die." Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 355 - The Philosophy of Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. An investigation into the foundations and implications of modern science, with special emphasis on the influence of philosophy on scientific thought, and on philosophic questions. Effective From: Spring 2009

Phil 380 - Philosophy of Language (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and Hist 213 or their equivalents, all with a grade of C or better. Examines tradition, formation and change in the ways that language shapes thought. Special attention is paid to the relationships between language and religion, as well as language and science. Effective From: Spring 2009