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Information Systems:   Information Systems
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

IS 117 - Introduction to Website Development (3-0-3)
This course discusses the concepts and skills required to plan, design and build websites. It will be taught in a lab to ensure hands-on experience with each of these tasks. The course begins with an overview of web technologies. Students learn to plan websites, which includes determining the business and end-user requirements for the site. Design includes learning to develop "mockups" of how the site will look and how people will use it. The major tools for building websites will be industry standard HTML and XHTML to describe webpage content, and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) for flexibly formatting the content. Using entire site, as well as "future-proofs" a website, allowing it to be viewed on every major web browser (such as Firefox or Chrome) and easily adapt to changes in future browser technology. The course features substantial hands-on projects comprising websites of several interlinked pages and images, enabling students to thoroughly learn the course's important concepts and skills. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 118 - Introduction to Software Application Tools (3-0-3)
This hands-on taught in a computer lab, introduces the general area of application development, including web and other software applications. This course will teach you about these tools through the use of the development of several applications. During this process you will learn about the general software development process, including the software development life cycle (SDLC), which covers gathering requirements, designing the application, application testing and implementation. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 127 - Introduction to Web Systems Design (3-0-0)
This course provides a critical, hands-on introduction to Web-based Information Systems and Web systems design. Students will research and discuss emerging trends, capabilities, and limitations of web technologies used to capture, store, access, and disseminate information for both businesses and online communities. Students will design and develop different types of websites and web applications which will then be analyzed as to their usability in real public and private settings. Effective From: Fall 2008 Until: Summer 2009

IS 217 - Advanced Website Development (3-0-3)
Pre-requisites: IS 117 or equivalent. This course discusses the concepts and skills required to plan, design and build advanced websites, with a focus on sophisticated user interaction enabled by programming the web browser (such as Internet Explorer or Chrome). Such programming is known as client-side scripting. These interactive websites utilize forms to gather user inputs, and vary both the content and display of the webpages based on the current user tasks and preferences. This includes designing and dynamically changing tabs and menus, as well as expanding and contracting sections of pages. Students will develop a thorough understanding of website usability (designing effective sites that people like, security and user privacy, browser capability (ensuring websites work on every major web browser), and the tools and skills that web developers use to add interactive features to websites. These skills include Javascript (for programming interactive features), the Document Object Model or DOM (specifying the internal structure of web pages), JQuery (to access information utilizing this internal structure, create animations and generally streamline Javascript), browser variables (providing information about the browser characteristics), HTML input forms, form validation (ensuring correctness of user input), securing user input (to ensure user privacy), cookies (tracking user information), basic communication with the web server (which processes the information users input into forms), and AJAX ( which integrates many of these technologies). The course will be taught in a lab to ensure hands-on experience and will include substantial design and development projects. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 218 - Building Web Applications (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CS 113 or 115, or other computing GUR. This course provides a critical, hands-on introduction to the design of Web-based Information Systems. We will explore and discuss emerging trends, capabilities, and limitations of web technologies used to capture, store, access, and disseminate information for both businesses and online communities. Students, working in groups, will design and develop different types of web applications, which will then be analyzed and critiqued by the students as to their usability in actual public and private settings. An open-source web content management system will be utilized throughout the course. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 245 - Information Technology Systems: Hardware/Software (3-0-3)
This course reviews hardware/software technologies in order to enable system developers to understand tradeoffs in the design of computer architectures for effective computer systems. Also covered are operating systems and systems architecture for networked computing systems. Topics include Hardware (CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets, multi processors versus single processors, and peripheral devices), Operating systems (processes, process management, memory and file system management), and Telecommunications (basic network components, switches, multiplexers and media, installation and configuration of multi-user operating systems). Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 247 - Designing the User Experience (3-0-3)
This course covers the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface in interactive computer systems. Among the topics covered are approaches to interface design such as menus, commands, direct manipulation; screen layout strategies; metaphor models; models of human information processes; evaluation approaches such as protocol for analysis, interactive monitoring, use of surveys; and requirements for documentation and help. Students are expected to design interface mockups and evaluate them. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 265 - Introduction to Information Systems (3-0-3)
Information systems is the study of how organizations use information technology. This course is an overview of the information systems discipline, the role of information systems in organizations, and the changing nature of information technology. Computer tools for analysis and presentation are used. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 270 - Designing the Multimedia Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Completion of 100 level course in the computing sciences: CS 101 or CS 111 or CS 113 or CS 115 or IS 118. Multimedia combines text, graphics, sound, video, and animation in a single application. Preparation for creating multimedia information systems, and understanding the crucial issues involving technology, design and effectiveness of multimedia applications. Programming techniques for integrating video, sound, animation, and graphics, and design strategies for multimedia information systems. Effective From: Fall 2010

IS 305 - Community Service Internship (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: IS 350. Increasingly, computer professionals are recognizing their ethical responsibility to provide advice and assistance that will improve the ability of government and social service agencies to use computers to serve the public. This course involves approximately 40 hours of internship in a community agency, arranged through the NJIT Cares Program. The interns will use their skills to improve the effectiveness of the use of computers at the agency. Bi-weekly progress reports will be submitted, with required meetings with the course supervisor, and a final report. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Spring 2014

IS 310 - Co-op Work Experience I (3)
Prerequisites: completion of the sophomore year, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated and approved by the Co-op office. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 322 - Mobile Applications: Design, Interface, Implementation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CS 113 or CS 115 or other computing GUR. This course is a practical introduction to building applications for mobile devices. The course combines hands on design and development experience, with a conceptual overview and discussion of design and practical development issues. Taken into account will be constraints and requirements of devices with small screen sizes, limited battery power, limited computational power, etc. Tools used for building an application in the context of a specific device such as iPhone or an Android based device will be discussed. Students build a mobile application to demonstrate their understanding of mobile web constraints and tools. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 331 - Database Design Management and Applications (3-0-3)
Prerequisite:Computing GUR. Businesses use databases extensively for analysis and decision-making because they provide efficient, large-scale information storage and rapid retrieval. Databases support the "back end functionality" of most large web systems. This course gives students extensive, pragmatic experience in designing, building, querying, updating, maintaining and managing relational databases, using the Structured Query Language (SQL). Proper database design principles are emphasized throughout the course, beginning with high level descriptions of relational databases using data modeling tools(such as entity-relationship or ER diagrams)and progressing to relational database design principles based on higher order normalizations. We will examine some poorly designed and show how theses can be transformed into well designed databases. SQL will be extensively covered, and students will design implement sophisticated SQL queries invoking self-joins, outer joins, correlated subqueries and related concepts. Students will explore and utilize design methodologies for input data validation and maintaining database integrity, and study issues of database privacy and security. Advanced topics to be discussed include the role of the Database Administrator (DBA), database life cycle activities, database denormalization, read-only database and data warehouses. Hands-on experience will be gained by with actual database using industry-standard database management systems such as Oracle. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 333 - Social Networking: Application and Interface Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Completion of computing and Statistics GUR. In this intensely hands-on course, you will analyze existing social networking sites (Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn, LISTSERV, etc.) in terms of usage and security implications, and identify design considerations for new application use. Working in teams, you will design and execute an implementation plan for add-on applications to an existing social networking site, manage the security settings and other aspects of these applications. This involves combining existing reusable components and developing the interface to these from the social networking sites. The team project will design solutions for an existing organization. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 335 - Introduction to .NET Framework (3-0-3)
This course introduces students to .NET Framework, a new computational environment that supports more than 25 programming languages and is platform and device independent. Problem solving and system development topics are integrated into the course by using C# languages as a vehicle to illustrate the concepts. Effective From: Spring 2007 Until: Spring 2012   (Archived Versions)

IS 344 - Computing Applications in Business (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Acct 115 or Acct 117, and either CS 100, CS 113 or CS 115 or Department permission. A comprehensive overview of the various types of computing applications used by businesses in order to run effectively and efficiently. All the major functional departments within organizations are examined and evaluated to see how applications are integrated to implement "business processes" that flow across department boundaries, and from suppliers to customers. The modeling of business situations and the design of applicable software solutions. A full-semester hands-on student project will provide experience in designing solutions to changes in the business environment. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 347 - Designing the User Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: None. This course covers the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface in interactive computer systems. Among the topics covered are approaches to interface design such as menus, commands, direct manipulation; screen layout strategies; metaphor models; models of human information processes; evaluation approaches such as protocol for analysis, interactive monitoring, use of surveys; and requirements for documentation and help. Students are expected to design interface mockups and evaluate them. Effective From: Spring 2011 Until: Fall 2011

IS 350 - Computers, Society and Ethics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Completion of 100 level course in the computing sciences: CS 101 or CS 111 or CS 113 or CS 115 or IS 118 and one basic SS course, and HUM 101. Examines the historical evolution of computer and information systems and explores their implications in the home, business, government, medicine and education. Topics include automation and job impact, privacy, and legal and ethical issues. Co-listed as STS 350.

IS 365 - Computer Applications to Commercial Problems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite:Computing GUR. Covers design and implementation of commercial application software systems. Concepts of organization and management of data and files including file operations and organization of sequential access, relative access, indexed sequential access, virtual storage access and multi-key access methods. The COBOL language is used to illustrate these concepts and to implement application systems. The design and implementation of commercially oriented computer systems. Emphasis is placed on modern computers as a tool for solving business problems. The COBOL programming language will be extensively studied and utilized in developing the programming techniques for the solution of these problems. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2011

IS 373 - Web Standards (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Completion of 100 level course in the computing sciences: CS 101 or CS 111 or CS 113 or CS 115 or IS 118. This course covers the standards that are emerging for formatting, accessing, displaying, transmitting and structuring information, including the standards and protocols existing and under development today. Topics include: Standards, Rationale, Pros and Cons, the Standards Process; Standards Bodies & Participating on Standards Bodies; How Companies Influence Standards; How Developers Incorporate Standards in their Programs; Planning for Emerging Standards; Company Policies Regarding Web Standards; Standards and Legal Issues. Effective From: Fall 2010

IS 375 - Evaluating the User Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: MATH 105, MATH 333. Methods for identifying usability problems and for testing the relative merits of alternative designs for interactive systems. Following a review of usability heuristics, students read journal articles about and practice five different methods: semi-structured interviews, protocol analysis, cognitive walkthroughs, user surveys, and controlled experiments. Effective From: Spring 2014

IS 385 - Special Topics in IS (3-0-3)
The study of new and/or advanced topics in an area of information systems and the computing sciences not regularly covered in any other IS course. The precise topics to be covered in the course, along with prerequisites, will be announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 390 - Requirements Analysis and Systems Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Computing GUR. A study of the information systems development life-cycle, from the initial stages of information requirements analysis and determination to the ultimate activities involving systems design. Theory, methodologies and strategies for information requirements analysis, including the assessment of transactions and decisions, fact-finding methodologies, structured analysis development tools, strategies of prototype development, and an overview of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. Theory, methodologies and strategies for systems design, including design of user-interfaces, particularly menu-driven and keyword dialogue strategies, and issues in the proper design of computer output. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 392 - Web Mining and Information Retrieval (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Completion of 100 level course in computing sciences: CS 101 or CS 111 or CS 113 or CS 115 or IS 118. This course introduces the design, implementation and evaluation of search engines and web mining applications. Topics include: automatic indexing, natural language processing, retrieval algorithms, web page classification and clustering, information extraction, summarization, search engine optimization, and web analytics. Students will gain hands-on experience applying theories in case studies. Effective From: Spring 2010

IS 405 - Internship in Community Service (1-0-1)
Prerequisite: IS 305 or its equivalent, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Service Learning and Career Development Services. This course involves approximately 40 hours of internship in a community agency, arranged through the NJIT Cares Program. The interns will use their skills to improve the effectiveness of the use of computers at the agency. Bi-weekly progress reports will be submitted, with required meetings with the course supervisor, and a final report. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Spring 2014

IS 410 - Co-op Work Experience II (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: IS 310 or its equivalent, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience as co-op/internship. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and/or project. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 413 - Requirements for Emergency Management Information Systems (3)
Requirements analysis, interface design, and supporting functionality of information systems related to the complete preparedness lifecycle for emergency, disaster, and crisis situations for government bodies and/or private organizations. Components of the lifecycle-planning, mitigation, training, alerting, response, recovery, and assessment, are studied. Human and organizational behavior in this environment and how it influences system functionality and design of the user interface. Integration and coordination issues across the phases of the process. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Spring 2014

IS 421 - Advanced Web Applications (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: IS 118 or IT 202, or instructor permission. This course introduces the next generation of web application platform and web applications - Web 2.0 and Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). The course covers key attributes of RIA development, defines Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and introduces different application development platform, design and development tools and languages supporting development and deployment of RIAs. The in-depth study of Microsoft.NET Framework and Silverlight will provide hands-on experience to develop and deploy RIAs. Effective From: Spring 2012

IS 431 - Database Design, Management and Applications (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of 100 level course in the computing sciences: CS 101 or CS 111 or CS 113 or CS 115 or IS 118. Database system components; data modeling using the Entity-Relationship model, Semantic Object model, UML and other data models; Relational Database Management Systems-functionality and design concepts and applications; querying a database; Structured Query Language; functional dependencies and higher order normalization for relational database design; relation decomposition; overview of concurrency control and transaction management; database application design and management issues. Student projects involve the use of DBMS packages, including Oracle and Microsoft Access. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2010

IS 433 - Electronic Commerce Requirements and Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: IS 431 or CS 431 and IS 390 or CS 490. Introduces critical concepts emerging in the field of electronic commerce, such as business to consumer (B2C), business to business (B2B), supply chain management (SCM) systems, and peer to peer (P2P). The course provides concepts and practical skills for building effective, usable, and secure electronic commerce systems, offering a conceptual framework for the study of electronic commerce, as well as hands-on skills for building systems for electronic commerce. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2011

IS 441 - Geographic Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: IS 431 or CS 431. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allow individuals and organizations to pose, explore and answer a variety of public- and private-sector questions using spatial data. In this course the student will learn to identify, manipulate and analyze spatial data using state-of-the-art software. The course is project-driven and hands-on: students will define and address real problems using real data. The course will also cover selected topics in information visualization as they relate to the use of GIS. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2011

IS 447 - Designing the User Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: IS 390. This course covers the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface in interactive computer systems. Among the topics covered are approaches to interface design such as menus, commands, direct manipulation; screen layout strategies; metaphor models; models of human information processes; evaluation approaches such as protocol for analysis, interactive monitoring, use of surveys; and requirements for documentation and help. Students are expected to design interface mockups and evaluate them. Effective From: Spring 2010 Until: Fall 2010

IS 448 - Design Studio for Ubiquitous Computing (3-0-3)
Handheld devices, mobile and wireless technologies, 'smart spaces', wearables and other technologies are creating a ubiquitous computing environment that is moving application development off the desktop. This course explores recent developments in both the technical and Human Computer Interaction (HCI) side of ubiquitous computing. To put into practice what is being learned, the class will use scenario based usability engineering techniques to design various aspects of a ubiquitous computing application to be deployed at NJIT. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 455 - Information Systems Management (3-0-3)
Prerequisite:Computing GUR for all students, IS 265 for BIBIS, BAIS, BSHCI and BSWIS majors. The information systems function in an organization has a broad responsibility to plan, develop or acquire, implement, and manage an infrastructure of information technology, data, and enterprise-wide information processing systems. This course will emphasize how information systems enable core and supportive business processes, as well as those that interface with suppliers, partners and customers. It will discuss basic administrative, management, and policy issues associated with the impact of information systems on the user and organization. Topics include the strategic uses of IS, enterprise computing architecture and infrastructure, software development management, organizational change, outsourcing, governance, risk management, and performance measurement. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 461 - Systems Simulation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level GUR course in computing; Math 333. This course introduces computer simulation as an algorithmic problem solving technique. Includes discrete simulation models, elementary theory, stochastic processes, use of simulation languages, random number generators, simulation of probabilistic processes, design of simulation experiments, validation of models, queueing systems, and applications to the design and analysis of operational systems. The GPSS language is covered in detail. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 465 - Advanced Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: IS 265, and either (IS 331 or CS 431) and Statistics GUR. Design and programming concepts are presented for automation of management information systems. Includes the organization of files and techniques for processing information based upon organizational requirements and available hardware and software. Some case studies are presented. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 475 - Evaluating the User Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a course in probability and statistics, or social science research methods. Methods for identifying usability problems and for testing the relative merits of alternative designs for interactive systems. Following a review of usability heuristics, students read journal articles about and practice five different methods: semi-structured interviews, protocol analysis, cognitive walkthroughs, user surveys, and controlled experiments. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2010

IS 485 - Special Topics in Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: junior standing and/or department approval. The study of new and/or advanced topics in an area of IS not regularly covered in any other IS course. The precise topics to be covered in the course, along with prerequisites, will be announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course. A student may register for no more than two semesters of Special Topics. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 486 - Topics in Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Same as for IS 485. A continuation of IS 485. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 488 - Independent Study in Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: open only to students in the Honors Program who are IS majors and who have the prior approval of the department and the IS faculty member who will guide the independent study. Independent studies, investigations, research, and reports on advanced topics in IS. Students must prepare, in collaboration with their faculty mentor and in the semester prior to enrolling in this course, a detailed plan of topics and expected accomplishments for their independent study. This must have the approval of both the department and the faculty mentor. A student may register for no more than one semester of Independent Study. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 491 - Senior Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: IS 331, IS 431, or CS 431, and senior standing. Integration of knowledge and skills gained in previous information systems courses into an individual research project. The project entails investigation of current literature and the design, implementation and evaluation of an information system. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 491H - Honors Senior Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: IS 465 and senior standing in the Honors College. A course similar to IS 491, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective From: Fall 2006

GRADUATE COURSES:

IS 500 - Introduction to Systems Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisites: statistics and differential equations. Covers a wide variety of systems oriented approaches to solving complex problems. Illustrative examples are chosen from a wide variety of applications. Mathematical tools are only introduced to the extent necessary to understand the technique and its application to the problem. Topic areas include probabilistic and decision theory models, simulation, morphological analysis, cluster analysis, structural modeling, Delphi and dynamic system models. The role for the computer in applying these techniques to complex problems will be discussed. The student will be exposed to some of the fundamental controversies concerning the appropriateness or validity of systems approaches to human problem solving. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 565 - Aspects of Information Systems (3 credits)
Co-requisite: CS 431 or permission of the department. Methods and models of supporting the management process; ethical issues pertaining to the construction, deployment, and impact of information systems on organizations and society; description, analysis, and design of information systems to assist problem solving and decision-making in a business environment. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 590 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience I (3 additive credits)
Prerequisite: students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the IS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the graduate IS curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the IS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for IS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of each semester's work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in IS. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 591 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience II (3 additive credits)
Prerequisite: students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the IS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the graduate IS curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the IS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for IS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of the semester work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in IS. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 592 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience III (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: graduate standing, and acceptance by the IS department and the Division of Career Development Services. Students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the IS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the graduate IS curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the IS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for IS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of the semester work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in IS. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 593 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience IV (0 credits)
Prerequisites: One immediately prior 3-credit registration for graduate co-op work experience with the same employer. Requires approval of departmental co-op advisor and the Division of Career Development Services. Must have accompanying registration in a minimum of 3 credits of course work. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 612 - Emergency Management Informatics (3 credits)
This course covers core aspects of Emergency Management (EM) as they relate to information systems and usage of associated technologies. EM theory identifies four critical areas: 1) understanding & mitigating risk, 2) planning & preparedness, 3) reaction & response, 4) recovery & normalization. The role of informatics for each critical area will vary and is the basis for discussions and assignments. This course also focuses on innovative information systems approaches to EM in each area. Within the EM domain, business continuity (information processing and sharing during crisis situations), cyberterrorism, and international response are covered. Effective From: Spring 2011

IS 613 - Design of Emergency Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This course is concerned with the development of requirements, the design of the human interaction, and the supporting functionality of any Information System related to the complete preparedness lifecycle for emergency, disaster, and crisis situations for government bodies, non-profit, and/or private organizations that are concerned with business continuity. It also focuses on organizational behavior and its effects on the functionality of the system and the design of the human interface. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 614 - Command and Control Systems (3 credits)
This course investigates the relevance and applicability of using of Command and Control (C2) models in organizational responses to both normal emergencies and catastrophic events. C2 refers to how leadership, authority, decision-making and coordination are assured within an organization, including distributed and virtual organizations. The course examines the functionality and properties of C2 systems in terms of matching requirements for these systems to the behavior of individuals, groups, and organizations during emergency conditions. It will address integrating systems and technologies within organizational emergency operations functions and processes to include business continuity and disaster response. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 615 - Improvisation in Emergency Management (3 credits)
This course explores the continuum between planned and improvised behavior in emergency management. It introduces tools and techniques useful for understanding and supporting decision-making in emergencies, and enables learners to apply them in simulated emergency response scenarios. The focus is on decision making under time pressure, the influence of cognitive, policy and organizational factors, and the design and use of technologies to support planned and improvised decision making. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2011

IS 616 - Learning Methodologies and Training Technologies (3 credits)
This course provides an overview of learning methodologies and training technologies, with an emphasis on emergency management. It reviews theories and develops skills for the planning, evaluation and selection of traditional and new technology-driven learning and training methods. Course participants will review relevant research and learn how to choose the most effective training methodologies, technologies and content resources appropriate to the needs of different audiences. Effective From: Fall 2007

IS 617 - Social Dimensions of Risk (3 credits)
Low-probability/high consequence events involving terrorism, food safety, and extreme weather offer ample evidence the prevalent approaches of economics and statistics are not able to deal with the complex ways that risk permeates modern societies. This course treats risk analysis as a broad interdisciplinary activity and draws on the full range of the social sciences to explore the multifaceted way that risk infuses itself into the fabric of contemporary affairs. Effective From: Spring 2007 Until: Fall 2008

IS 623 - Qualitative Research on Information Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: IS 350 (or equivalent covering basics of research in IS) or IS 675. A review of major qualitative research methods in Information Systems research, including interviews, content analysis, participant observation (ethnography), case and field studies, group techniques, and selected other methods. Students read and make experiential use of articles providing examples of the use of these methods in the IS journal literature. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2011

IS 631 - Enterprise Database Management (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in database or design and management, or permission of instructor. This course provides an understanding of the issues as well as hands-on experience in managing database systems as an essential organizational resource. Students will obtain a conceptual foundation of database design and explore the implications for organizational database usage. Students also will gain experience with enterprise database management systems, such as Oracle. This course introduces the design and management of enterprise-wide database systems. Topics include: (1) data modeling and database design; (2) database implementation with SQL; (3) database access standards for enterprise database systems; (4) multidimensional databases, online analytic processing (OLAP) and data warehousing, customer relationship management (CRM); and (5) web-based enterprise database systems. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 634 - Information Retrieval (3 credits)
Prerequisites: IS 631 or CS 631; working knowledge of an object-oriented programming language. Modern information retrieval systems, such as web search engines, empower users to easily access information on the web. The course covers the concepts and principles of information retrieval systems design, including web crawling, automatic indexing, vector space modeling, retrieval algorithms, digital libraries, text mining, information extraction, and document warehousing. These techniques are essential for building web systems, text databases, document processing systems, and other advanced information management systems. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 658 - Multimedia Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CS 601 or CS 602 or experience in an object-oriented programming language. Multimedia software systems incorporate various media, such as text, images, video and audio, to provide rich experiences for users. This is a course in the design, implementation and evaluation of multimedia systems. The course has three major content areas and goals: (1) multimedia data types-the goal being to understand the development and use of various multimedia data types; (2) usability and user modeling-the goal being to incorporate theories of human perception and cognition into the design and evaluation of multimedia systems; and (3) multimedia design and software tools-the goals being to plan and develop multimedia projects and to be aware of ways in which multimedia is being used in the public and private sectors. Students will also develop familiarity with one multimedia authoring package. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 661 - User Experience Design (3-0-3)
This is a foundation course on the design of digital products. User eXperience Design (UXD) isn?t just about making interfaces usable. It is about designing and building relevant and successful products. Effective UXD requires a mix of Interaction Design (ID) methods and processes. This course takes you through the process of creating compelling interaction designs for digital products from the idea stage into creating a simple and intuitive user experience blueprint. You will `learn by doing? in a team environment, enabling you to practice the techniques with coaching from instructions. The course will demystify Lean UX; Agile UX; Human Computer Interaction (HCI); Design Audits and Claims analysis; Persona construction; Storyboarding; ID scenarios; ID Frameworks; Role of user-research in UXD; and Design Patterns. Effective From: Spring 2014

IS 663 - System Analysis and Design (3 credits)
This course develops the skills necessary to analyze, design and manage the development of effective enterprise-scale information systems solutions incorporating contemporary methods and effective organizational and global project management practices. It focuses on technical business systems analysis and design techniques, and covers key software engineering principles, methods and frameworks, including process models, agile and lean principles, project and risk management, estimation, requirements elicitation and analysis, modeling, system and software architecture, design patterns, and quality systems. Students will actively participate in discussions, review selected articles, participate in team exercises and collaborate on projects involving analysis and prototyping of applications addressing real-world problems and integrating current and emerging technologies. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 664 - Customer Discovery (3-0-3)
'Customer Discovery' is the term used by lean startup companies to describe the process of directly engaging with customers to explore potential new markets. Such evidence-based entrepreneurship guides the potential for new product ideas early in the development process. Similarly, high-tech innovators in new media, web, software apps, social networking, wearable computing, and mobile devices need to determine early on if their proposed solutions address real user needs. They do this by understanding potential user?s practice, preferences and mental models. As a result, knowledge of a basic set of qualitative customer discovery methods is essential for both the lean startup entrepreneur and those engaged in interaction design innovation. This course teaches these methods through hands-on team projects. Students will design and run interview and diary studies, thinking out-loud protocols and focus groups, and analyze and report on findings. Students will explore over the course of the semester a problem domain and gain understanding of customer needs that will serve as a foundation for high-tech, innovative product design. Effective From: Spring 2014

IS 665 - Data Analytics for Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Undergraduate course in probability and statistics, and undergraduate-level programming. This course gives a graduate level introduction to data analysis, probability and statistics from an information systems perspective, including many of the techniques that are most relevant to the profession of Data Scientist for business, data and web analytics, as well as current data sets. We will learn and conduct Python, matlab and R based manipulation of data. Course topics include the rudiments of probability and random variables, estimation, special distribution and sampling, Markov processes, hypothesis testing, graphics and visualization. Effective From: Spring 2014

IS 675 - Information System Evaluation (3 credits)
Theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to evaluate information systems within the context of the user and organizational environment. Topics include qualitative techniques such as protocol analysis and interviews; quantitative techniques such as sample surveys and controlled experiment; cost-benefit analysis, and analyses of data gathered by these approaches by methods such as regression, correlation, and analysis of variance. Emphasis on the application of these approaches to improve functionality, interface, and acceptance of information systems in organizations. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 676 - Requirements Engineering (3 credits)
Corequisites: IS 663 or CS 673 or equivalent project experience in the field. Requirements engineering is one of the all-important beginning stages of the systems development life cycle. Revealing and understanding the system's requirements is a crucial component of success for developing new computing systems or adjusting existing applications. This course covers the theory, principles, and practical application of the methodologies and tools for requirements engineering. The focus is development of large software systems and the integration of multiple systems into a comprehensive, domain dependent solution. All aspects of requirements engineering including the knowledge and skills needed to elicit and analyze requirements, translate these requirements into technical specifications, verify that the requirements accurately capture the system requirements, and manage software requirements through the system development cycle will be covered. Students will actively participate in discussions, labs and exercises, and prepare operational requirements and technical specifications for real-world problems. We will spend a considerable amount of time interacting and learning through discussion of assigned readings and other material. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 677 - Information System Principles (3 credits)
This course introduces the field of Information Systems; the study of how people and organizations should use information technologies effectively. We examine the major areas in the field, analyzing the major issues, trends and problems. We survey the role of information systems in organizations and how these systems support organizational objectives and organizational structure, as well as providing competitive business advantages. We discuss basic concepts such as the systems point of view, the organization of a system, the nature of information and information flows, as well as how people process information and related cognitive concepts. We also examine various types of information system applications such as e-commerce, supply chain, decision support, and enterprise systems. And, finally, we also consider critical ethics issues including privacy, personalization and security. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 678 - IT Service Management (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Prior coursework or industry experience in Information Systems, or permission of instructor, otherwise we do not recommend taking IS 678 in the first semester. This course introduces the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) fundamentals of the service management life cycle-service strategy, service design, service transition, service operation, and continual service improvement. ITIL provides a comprehensive, consistent, and coherent framework of best practices for IT Service Management (ITSM), which promotes a quality approach for achieving business effectiveness and efficiency in the use of information systems. This course presents the basic terminology and an overview of the functions and processes for each of the life cycle phases as they apply to IT Management. Although ITIL is originally presented as an approach for designing IT processes, we can expand this view and apply it to the design of other business services. Possible semester-long contexts are the processes of an educational services provider or health care services provider. Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 679 - Information Systems Strategy (3 credits)
Prerequisites: IS 677 or MIS 645. This course explores issues and approaches in managing information systems in organizations and how they integrate, support, and enable various types of organizational capabilities. It takes a management perspective in exploring the acquisition, development and implementation of efficient and effective information systems. The course also addresses issues relating to defining a high-level technology infrastructure and the systems that support the operational, administrative and strategic needs of the organization. The course is focused on developing an intellectual framework that will allow leaders of organizations to critically assess existing infrastructures and emerging technologies as well as how these enabling technologies might affect organizational strategy. The ideas developed and cultivated in this course are intended to provide an enduring perspective that can help leaders make sense of an increasingly global and technology intensive business environment. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 680 - Information Systems Auditing (3 credits)
Due to the dynamic nature of information technology, the need arises continually to redefine audit, control and security requirements and processes. Topics include the IS audit process, IT infrastructure and operations, information protection, disaster recovery and business continuity, IT service delivery and support, business application systems, and project management. Students gain practical experience with each by working through a series of sample Certified Information Systems Audit (CISA) exam questions. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 681 - Computer Security Auditing (3 credits)
This course reflects the current emphasis on information security and security management in Fortune 500 corporations. Students will delve into information protection concepts, privacy impact analysis, computer crime, legal issues, controls and auditing systems, and firewall configuration. Students will have the opportunity to learn and perform evaluations on security infrastructures in a controlled environment in class labs by completing realistic security auditing projects and using vulnerability assessment tools to assess risks and evaluate security controls on networked infrastructures. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 682 - Forensic Auditing for Computing Security (3 credits)
A computer forensics audit is the proper identification and collection of computer evidence. Computers are involved in security violations through crime or violations of policy, or being targeted by an attack. This course deals with the preservation, identification, extraction, documentation, reporting, acquisition, analysis and interpretation of computer data. Topics covered include evidence handling, chain of custody, collection, preservation, identification and recovery of computer data. In this hands-on course, you will conduct several labs where you will be taught to analyze, review and extract information from computer hard drives, and determine what and how the information could have been compromised. Computer Forensics Audit professionals become experts in e-discovery and preserving sensitive evidential matter. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 683 - Web Systems Web Development (3 credits)
Students will gain experience in open source web development through an intensive hands-on project, applying real-world problem-solving skills to meeting information systems requirements. Students will learn Web development principles, as well as professionally relevant skills including industry standards, conventions, and procedures within large-scale programming projects. Also covered are the communication tools, technologies, and practices that individuals use to coordinate and collaborate within the open source software development community. Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 684 - Business Process Innovation (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Prior coursework or industry experience in Information Systems, or permission of instructor, otherwise we do not recommend taking IS 684 in the first semester. This course adopts a balanced approach to business process innovation (BPI) that includes both incremental improvement and re-engineering. It specifically examines the concept of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) and the use of web services as a way to enable scalable and adaptive business processes. Students will learn how to develop process maps using the Business Process Modeling Notation (BPMN) and design process improvements to achieve efficiency, effectiveness, compliance and agility objectives. The focus of the course is on ways in which information technology can be used to manage, transform and improve business processes. Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 685 - Enterprise Architecture and Integration (3 credits)
Prerequisites: None, but recommend completion of IS 663 or CS 673. The Enterprise Architecture (EA) describes an organization's IT strategy and operational structure. IS and IT professionals utilize the EA to analyze, design and integrate the (often heterogeneous) IT infrastructure and applications to most effectively support the enterprise and respond to risks. Students learn to develop an EA analysis which reflects its business strategies, capabilities, processes, and systems, metrics, information resources, and networking infrastructure. This enables students to determine the impact of IT solutions, by learning to deconstruct, analyze and configure IT systems in alignment with enterprise-wide business strategies. The course covers the industry standard The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) enterprise architecture framework and focuses on Enterprise Application Integration (EAI). Effective From: Summer 2009

IS 686 - Pervasive Computing: An HCI Perspective (3 credits)
This course examines Pervasive/Ubiquitous Computing, the trend toward increasingly ubiquitous connected computing devices in the environment - a trend being brought about by a convergence of advanced electronic, and particularly, wireless technologies and the internet. We do this from a Human Computer Interaction perspective looking at the current and future design of various systems. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 687 - Transaction Mining and Fraud Detection (3 credits)
Pre-requisite: An undergraduate course in probability and statistics. Increasingly, all of our transactions are electronic. We use debit and credit cards (electronic transactions) instead of checks and cash at banks, restaurants, stores, and many other businesses. Evaluation of transactions to find risk includes detection of terrorists and money launderers. Every financial institution is legally required to monitor transactions to detect organized crime and terrorism. Mining transaction streams to find good or bad customers in a rapidly growing area of employment for IS graduates. This course will present methods that are being used to analyze and mine transactional data and the business applications of these methods. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 688 - Web Mining (3 credits)
Web mining aims to discover useful information and knowledge from the Web hyperlink structure, page contents and usage logs. It has direct applications in e-commerce, Web analytics, information retrieval/filtering, personalization, and recommender systems. Employees knowledgeable about Web mining techniques and their applications are highly sought by major Web companies such as Google, Amazon, Yahoo, MSN and others who need to understand user behavior and utilize discovered patterns from terabytes of user profile data to design more intelligent applications. The primary focus of this course is on Web usage mining and its applications to business intelligence and biomedical domains. We learn techniques from machine learning, data mining, text mining, and databases to extract useful knowledge from the Web and other unstructured/semistructured, hypertextual, distributed information repositories. This data could be used for site management, automatic personalization, recommendation, and user profiling. Topics covered include crawling, indexing, ranking and filtering algorithms using text and link analysis, applications to search, classification, tracking, monitoring, and Web intelligence. Programming assignments give hands-on experience. A group project highlights class topics. Effective From: Fall 2009

IS 690 - Web Services and Middleware (3 credits)
Web services enable integration of web-based applications and feature sets to any other web-based system in a modular way. Middleware is a set of functionality positioned in between and enabling interoperability among different, distributed enterprise and other computing applications. This course provides an introduction to web services and middleware in the context of digital libraries - large scale multimedia information repositories. Students will gain hands on experience in developing their own web services managing a complex distributed computing platform. Effective From: Spring 2010

IS 698 - Special topics in Information Systems (3)
Special area course given when suitable interest develops. Advance notice of forthcoming topics will be given. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
An approved project involving design, implementation, and analysis, or theoretical investigation, under the guidance of a faculty member. Students are strongly advised to work with the faculty member to develop a project proposal during the semester prior to conducting the master's project. Approval to register for the project must be obtained from the faculty member advising the project.

IS 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
An approved research-oriented project involving design, implementation, and analysis or theoretical investigation, carried out under the supervision of a faculty member who will be the thesis advisor. The thesis should be of such depth and caliber as to warrant publication in a technical or scientific journal. Approval to register for the thesis must be obtained from the thesis advisor. A student must register for a minimum of 3 credits per semester. Credit will be limited, however, to the 6 credits required for the thesis. Students are strongly advised to work with the thesis advisor to develop a thesis proposal during the semester prior to commencing the project.

IS 725 - Independent Study in Information Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and department consent. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 732 - Design of Interactive Systems (3 credits)
Design of interactive systems and human computer interfaces. Covers the current professional literature in this field and the knowns about design. Emphasizes application areas that have a great deal of cognitive variability and diverse user populations. Design interfaces for various applications. The impact of costs and operational practices upon user behavior and current research topics in interface design are covered. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 735 - Social Media (3 credits)
Prerequisite: IS 675 or 764, or a graduate course in statistics (e.g., math 661) or quantitative research methods. Seminar style course that covers design and impact of computer-based systems for human communication, including email and IM, discussion boards, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS), and Social Networking Systems. Topics include alternative design structures, impacts of primarily text-based group communication, and recent empirical studies of virtual teams, online communities, and systems used for social networking, including 3-D worlds such as Second Life and "micro blogging" systems such as Twitter. Effective From: Spring 2013

IS 754 - Measurement and Evaluation of Software Quality and Performance (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Ph.D. core courses, CS 630, CS 661. A study of the tools for the measurement of software products and the use of these tools in the evaluation of software quality and performance. Structural and functional models of algorithms, programs, and systems are presented to define the quantitative and subjective characteristics of computer products. Course includes the use of hardware and software tools, the study of simulation and analytic techniques, description of workloads and benchmarks for system evaluation, problems of scale, proof of program correctness, feature value analysis, and the design and interpretation of experiments. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 762 - Computerized Information Systems for Planning and Forecasting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: IS 675. Capturing and processing of subjective and empirical data for use in planning and forecasting information systems and the incorporation of these facilities into information systems designs. Emphasis on conveying understanding of the limitations of various methods and techniques to meet various planning and forecasting objectives. Use of various techniques such as the Delphi method, structural modeling, cluster analysis and regression approaches. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 763 - Qualitative Methods in IS Research (3)
Prerequisites: IS 675 or IS 350 (or an equivalent course) A review of major qualitative research methods in Information Systems research, including interviews, content analysis, participant observation (ethnography), case and field studies, group techniques, and selected other methods. Students read and make experiential use of articles providing examples of the use of these methods in the IS journal literature. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008

IS 764 - Research Methods for Human-Centered Computing and Design (3 credits)
Prerequisites: None. This introductory seminar in human centered computing and design provides a survey of the methodological literature on qualitative research methods paired with appropriate article-length exemplars. We cover a variety of different research strategies including design science, action research, case study, qualitative data collection and analysis techniques, and scenario-based design. This course develops skills in designing and evaluating systems using qualitative methods. We also discuss writing and reviewing academic articles and research proposals. The course utilizes information systems as the primary domain but could be extended for students in other disciplines. Effective From: Fall 2009

IS 765 - Quantitative Methods in Information Systems Research (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 661 or equivalent. This course is a practical and project-oriented introduction to quantitative methods in information systems (IS) research. The focus of the course is on developing researchers' capability to select and implement appropriate statistical procedures for a variety of research questions and to interpret the results of these procedures. Effective From: Fall 2010

IS 766 - Philosophy of Information Science (3-0-3)
This seminar explores central issues in contemporary philosophy of science. We consider "scientific" progress in the computing sciences with a focus on information systems and human computer interaction theory. We discuss topics such as confirmation and disconfirmation of theories; falsifiability and pseudo-science; introduction; probability; and statistical inference, prediction, explanation and empirical equivalence. We read key works by philosophers such as Popper and Kuhn. We examine the notion of "design science" and contrast it with "natural science", and examine whether social science research should strive to emulate natural science methods. Readings will be tied into research within information systems and the computing sciences in general, looking at how scientific theories are tested or confirmed. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 767 - Decision Support Systems (3 credits)
The design, implementation, and utilization of models and their software support systems for application in managerial decision making at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Topics include the perspective of decision-support systems, the management of large simulation models and documentation standards, combined hybrid simulation languages and their applications, financial modeling and financial modeling languages. Systems dynamics and its managerial applications at the strategic level; specialized modeling and analysis software packages for managerial decision making; and recent research in computer-aided tools for capturing group judgment, modeling, and decision-making are also discussed. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 776 - IS Research Proposition (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Restricted to students in the doctoral program in Information Systems. Students must have an approved program of study and approval of a faculty advisor to register for this course, which precedes the dissertation proposal. Students enrolled in this course will, develop a grant proposal following the NSF Grant Proposal Guide. Students are required to present their work in the IS Research Seminar. The completed proposal will be evaluated by a reviewing panel for approval. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 786 - Special Topics (3 credits)
These seminars examine a special interest area of Information Systems in depth. Each seminar emphasizes recent work in the area selected. Effective From: Summer 2010

IS 787 - Information Systems PhD Seminar A (1 credit)
The seminar includes student presentations related to their research, faculty presentations, and occasional outside speakers. Its goal is to enable students to identify their research areas for the dissertation, and to obtain constructive feedback on their papers and research in progress. Two presentations are required of each student. Open to students in the PhD program in Information Systems. Effective Until: Fall 2008

IS 788 - Information Systems PhD Seminar (3 credits)
Prerequisite: restricted to students in the doctoral program in Information Systems (or students in the joint Rutgers- NJIT PhD in management who major in CIS). The seminar includes student presentations related to their research, faculty presentations, and occasional outside speakers. Its goal is to enable students to identify their research area for the dissertation, and to obtain constructive feedback on their papers and research in progress. Students are required to engage in a research internship under the direction of a faculty member, and to make at least three presentations, including at least one for a paper to be submitted to a professional meeting or journal. Effective From: Spring 2007

IS 790 - Doctoral Dissertation and Research (Credits as designated)
For PhD students who have completed the qualifying exam. Research and writing are carried out under the supervision of a designed graduate faculty member. The completed dissertation should be a substantial contribution to the knowledge of the topic under research, and of sufficient merit to warrant publication in a leading scientific or technical journal. Effective From: Fall 2011

IS 791 - Graduate Seminar (Non-credit)
A seminar in which faculty, students, and invited speakers will present summaries of advanced topics in information systems. In the course students and faculty will discuss research procedures, dissertation organization, and content. Students engaged in research will present their own problems and research progress for discussion and criticism. Effective From: Spring 2007

IS 792 - Pre-Doctoral Research (3 credits)
Prerequisite: permission from department chairperson. For students admitted to the doctoral program in IS who have passed the field exam or the qualifying examination. Research is carried out under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Students identify a research problem and prepare a plan to solve the problem. A maximum of 6 credits of IS 792 may be applied to the IS 790 requirement. Effective From: Fall 2006

IS 794 - Computer Science/Information Systems Colloquium (Non-credit)
Prerequisite: graduate standing with major in computer science. Colloquium in which national and international experts in the various fields of computer science are invited to present and discuss the results of their recent research. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Fall 2008