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History:   Offered by the Federated History Department of NJIT and Rutgers-Newark
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Hist 125 - Mapping Human History (3-0-3)
An introduction to the relationship of time and space in human history, using selected case studies drawn from a wide range of historical periods and places. Students learn to read and use maps, with a particular emphasis on the critical examination of evidence. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Hist 213 - The Twentieth-Century World (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: HUM 101 and HUM 102 with a grade C or better. Uses case studies to provide an interdisciplinary view of the 20th-century world. Selected literary, philosophical, and artistic movements are discussed in the context of the major historical developments of the century. This course satisfies three credits of the GUR in Cultural History. Effective From: Fall 2011

Hist 310 - Co-op in Law, Technology, Culture & History I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Students gain work experience related to their major in Law, Technology and Culture. Work assignments are facilitated and approved by the co-op office. Requires mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 311 - Co-op in Law, Technology, Culture & History II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Students gain work experience related to their major in Law, Technology and Culture. Work assignments are facilitated and approved by the co-op office. Requires mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 312 - Professional Development in Law (1-0-1)
This course is designed to enhance professional development for students who hope to attend law school or another graduate program. It will provide students with the skills necessary to apply to, be accepted into, and succeed in law school or other graduate program. It will meet workshop-style for three hours for five weeks. Effective From: Spring 2014

Hist 334 - Environmental History of North America (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The history of interactions between humans and their natural environment on the North American Continent. Considers perceptions of, use of, and alteration of the environment. Traces the cultural, intellectual, economic, political and technological transformations from early colonial times to the late 20th century. Addresses the diverse environmentalisms that have emerged the last several decades. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 341 - The American Experience (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. American history from the colonies to the 20th century, with concentration on several selected themes basic to an understanding of the changing cultural patterns and social values of American civilization. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 343 - African-American History I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Introduction to African-American history from pre-colonial West Africa to emancipation in the mid-19th century. Topics include the African slave trade, the economics and politics of slavery, gender and culture in the slave community, and the free black experience in both the north and south. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 344 - African-American History II (3-0-3)
HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212, HIST 213, R510:200-- 299, R512:200--299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Introduction to African-American history from the mid-19th century to the present. Covers race relations and the civil rights movement, as well as migration, black social and political thought, gender roles, and class formation. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 345 - Communication through the Ages (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Modes of communication, ancient and modern, in their social and cultural context?from cave painting to computers. Topics include literacy and economic development in the West; the technological revolution in media beginning with Daguerre, Samuel Morse, and Alexander Graham Bell; the institutional development of mass media and popular culture; and contemporary trends in world communication and interaction. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 351 - Ancient Greece and the Persian Empire (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The political, institutional, and cultural developments of Ancient Greece and the Persian Empire from the Mycenaean period to the King's Peace (386 B.C.). Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 352 - The Hellenistic States and the Roman Republic (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The political and cultural developments of the Hellenistic states and their influence on the Republic of Rome to 30 B.C. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 359 - History of the Middle East I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better The political, cultural, and institutional developments in the Middle East from the Parthians to the capture of Constantinople by the Ottoman Turks. Four periods will be analyzed: the Parthian, the Sassanid Persian, the Caliphate, and the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks. Effective From: Spring 2013 Until: Spring 2014

Hist 360 - History of the Middle East II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The political, cultural, and institutional developments in the Middle East from the capture of Constantinople by the -Ottoman Turks to the impact of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the world today. Effective From: Spring 2013 Until: Spring 2014

Hist 361 - The Founding of the American Nation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. North America in the colonial and revolutionary periods, with emphasis on patterns of cultural and institutional development from early settlement through the ratification of the Constitution. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 362 - Sex, Gender, and the Law in American History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines how the US legal system has dealt with the problems of sex and gender. Surveys laws that dictated different roles for men and women as well as seemingly gender-neutral laws that affected men and women differently. Tracks the designation of sexual acts as legal or illegal and the ways that race, class, and nationality complicated these relationships. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 363 - The United States as a World Power (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. American domestic and foreign policy in the 20th century. Topics include imperialism, the Progressive Era, the Depression, the New Deal, World Wars I and II, the Cold War, America and the world today. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 364 - American Law in the World (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Concerns the history of American law as a product and catalyst of world politics by considering in global context the transformation of central doctrines of regulation, property rights, and civil liberties from the Declaration of Independence through the War on Terror. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 365 - Comparative Colonial History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. A comparative analysis of the relationship between expanding Western nations and selected regions of Africa, Asia, and South America, from 1500 to 1970. A case study approach illuminates key historical processes, with a special emphasis on economic development and cultural change in colonial settings. Topics include European perceptions of culturally different peoples, race relations in colonial societies, forms of rebellion and resistance to European rule, nationalist movements. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 366 - Gender, Race and Identity in American History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Surveys the social construction of gender in America from the s17th century to the present. Examines the changing gender roles and relations that have characterized and structured the historical experiences of different racial and ethnic groups. In a multicultural framework, covers the impact that colonization, industrialization, slavery, immigration and migration, urbanization, war, and social movements have had on the ways that women and men think of themselves in terms of gender as well as their respective roles in families and larger social networks. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 367 - International Law and Diplomacy in History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines the origins, evolution, and application of diplomacy and international law from the 15th century to the present. Topics include the rise of modern diplomacy in Renaissance Italy; the emergence of international law and professionalization of diplomacy in early modern Europe; the development of international law and diplomatic theory in the 18th and 19th centuries; the codification of international law; and adaptation of international law to transnationalism and globalism in the 20th century. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 368 - Comparative Economic History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. A comparative analysis of the history of economic development, with particular attention to industrialization, shifting patterns of global trade, and changing labor markets. Topics include the Industrial Revolution, the rise of the world economy, the transformation of non-Western economies, labor migration, and newly industrializing countries. Effective From: Spring 2013 Until: Spring 2014

Hist 369 - Law and Society in History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Uses historical case studies to illustrate and evaluate various approaches to the study of law and society. Topics include criminality and the rise of incarceration as a legal penalty in the 19th century; the comparative law of slavery; and the evolution of American Indian law. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 370 - Legal issues in the History of Media (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better.Investigates the development and impact of media law and policy in the United States. Examines how media law and policy affect media content, industry behavior, and consumer rights. Analyzes the values and ideas, as well as political and cultural contexts, that have guided continuities and transformations in media law and policy. Topics include indecency and obscenity, copyright and intellectual property, legal protections for children, and media ownership regulation. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 372 - Contemporary Europe (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. European society in the 20th century, Nationalism, imperialism, totalitarianism, movements toward European unity, and prominent cultural developments. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 373 - The Rise of Modern Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines the development of modern science in the western world from the origins of the Scientific Revolution to 1900. Explores how science challenged the revealed universe of Christianity, changed the curriculum in schools and universities, and altered the world view of philosophers. This course covers the achievements of Copernicus, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, Einstein, and other leading scientific innovators, but it also weaves the expansion of scientific knowledge into the larger fabric of European intellectual history. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 374 - Modern Russian Civilization (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Russia under the last tsars, the 1917 upheavals, rise of the Soviet state to world power under Lenin, Stalin, and others, until the collapse of the communist dictatorship. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 375 - Legal Issues in Environmental History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better.Examines the role of law in the formation of human relationships with the natural world. The course will focus on the management and regulation of the human use of natural resources in a variety of historical contexts, but particularly in the United States from colonial times to the present. Through readings and class discussion, students will explore a number of recurring themes, including the transformation from customary rules governing access to local resources to state enforced laws. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 377 - Cities in History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines social, cultural and economic changes in urban areas. Regions and themes vary and may include urbanization in Europe, the rise of cities in Latin America, and urban change in contemporary America. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 378 - Medicine and Health Law in Modern America (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines the legal and ethical aspects of medical and public health practice in the United States from 1900 to the present. Topics include the rights and responsibilities of physicians and patients, the roles of government in promoting health, the rise of health law and bioethics, the tensions between civil liberties and public health, as well as evolving notions of harm, liability, uncertainty, and proof as they relate to the history of medical and public health practice. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 379 - History of Medicine (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better.Focuses on the evolving institutions, values, concepts, and techniques through which doctors attempted to control the impact of disease and preserve the health of Americans, beginning with the shaman and colonial physician through post-World War II changes in the system of medical care. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 380 - History of Public Health (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Attempts to protect the health of human populations from the Black Death in medieval Europe to recent threats from epidemics and chemical and biological terrorism. Shiftings patterns of disease and the emergence and growth of public health as a domain of expert knowledge and policy. Topics include: epidemiology and statistical modes of inquiry; the tension between civil liberties and public health; the economics of health and disease; and the relationship between medicine and public health. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 381 - Germs Genes & Body: Sci. & Tech. in Modern Medicine (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Examines how science and technology came to play critical roles in the rise of modern medicine. Readings, lectures, and discussion focus on the specific innovations in ideas, practices, and technologies that helped transform Western medicine in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course also considers how medicine and the biomedical sciences both inform and reflect attitudes about the human body in Western society. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 382 - War and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The evolution of warfare and the impact of war on political, economic, cultural, and social institutions, including the two World Wars and post-1945 conflicts. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 383 - The Making of Modern Thought (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. The formation of contemporary images of human nature since the mid-19th century. Emphasis on Marx, Darwin, and Freud and their legacy to 20th century thought. Theories of the family, sexuality, and the changing role of women in society are explored. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 385 - Technology and Society in European and World History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. An introduction to the social history of European and global tech-nology from the Middle Ages to the second Industrial Revolution of the late 19th century. Emphasis on such themes as the process of tech-nological innovation, the nature of technological systems, the diffusion of technology, the interaction of Western and non-Western technology, the changing relations of science and technology, and the role of technology in broader historical movements. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 386 - Technology in American History (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Survey of the history of American technology emphasizing the social and economic environments of technological change. Topics include the transfer of technology in building canals and cities, the rise of the factory system, the emergence of the American system of manufacture, and the development of major technological systems such as the railroad, telegraph, electric light and power, and automobile production and use. Focus on the professionalization of engineering practice, the industrialization of invention, and the growing links between engineers and corporate capitalism in the 20th century. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 388 - Britain in the 20th Century (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. A survey of British history from the death of Queen Victoria to 1964 with emphasis on the social and political trans-formation resulting from Britain's declining economy and world position. Topics include: the causes and impact of the two World Wars, the transition from liberal democracy to welfare state, the turn from Empire to Europe, social and economic trends as well as foreign -relations. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 390 - Historical Problems of the 20th Century through Film (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hum 101, Hum 102 and one from among Hum 211, Hum 212, and Hist 213 or their equivalents R510:200 through 299 or R512:200 through 299 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. A study of selected problems in the 20th century using film as a window into history. Such topics as the rise of Nazi Germany, America in the thirties, World War II and American society, the development of cities, and the emergence of the Third World will be considered. In any one semester only two topics will be selected for study. The material for the course will include documentary films, newsreels, TV news films, and theatrical feature films as well as selected readings. Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 401, 402 - Independent Studies in History (1-0-1, or 2-0-2, or 3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better in addition to a junior or senior standing; and before registering, permission from one of the following: NJIT history department chairperson, associate chairperson or history minor advisor. Pursuit of special interests in history not covered in a regular elective course. A history faculty member provides guidance and assigns readings and papers. Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

Hist 489 - Seminar-Readings (3-0-3)
prerequisites: Completion of the GUR in English (3 credits), CUltural History (6 credits), Basic Social Sciences (6 credits) an upper level History course (3 credits) and senior standing. Intended to combine study of specific topics, which vary each year, with attention to the methods for researching and writing history, these small classes for history majors in their senior year prepare students for the following semester's research project and culminate in a brief paper describing a proposed topic and the historical documents and sources to be used. Effective From: Fall 2012

Hist 489H - Senior History Honors Seminar: Readings (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Limited to senior history majors who are enrolled in the Albert Dorman Honors College or who receive permission from the undergraduate history advisor. Meets with 510:489 but includes more advanced readings. Effective Until: Fall 2007

Hist 490 - Seminar Research (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Hist 489. In this continuation of the two-semester seminar sequence, students research, outline, and write a substantial paper they design in conjunction with the professor. Effective From: Fall 2012

Hist 490H - Senior History Honors Seminar: Research (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HUM 102 and one from among HUM 211, HUM 212 and HIST 213 or their equivalents with a grade of C or better. Limited to senior history majors who are enrolled in the Albert Dorman Honors College or who receive permission from the undergraduate history advisor. Meets with 510:490 but includes more rigorous research and writing requirements. Effective Until: Fall 2007

R510:201-202 - History of Western Civilization (3,3)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog. Effective Until: Fall 2007

R510:249 - An Introduction to China (3)
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R510:317 - History of the Caribbean (3)
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R510:321 - Military History of the Western World (3)
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R510:325 - History of Mexico and Central America (3)
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R510:333 - History of Imperialism (3)
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R510:334 - 20th-Century Fascism (3)
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R510:337 - The History of Iran (3)
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R510:338 - The Ottoman Empire (3)
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R510:340 - Women in European History (3)
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R510:346 - Medieval Legal History (3)
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R510:355 - Traditional China: Institutions and Society (3)
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R510:356 - History of the People's Republic of China (3)
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R510:361 - The Near and Middle East (3)
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R510:364 - Contemporary Issues in Puerto Rican History (3)
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R510:366 - History of Poland (3)
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R510:369 - Modern Eastern Europe (3)
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R510:370 - History of Modern Ukraine (3)
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R510:373 - The English Novel in History (3)
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R510:379 - Colonialism and Decolonization (3)
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R510:380 - History of the Mass Media in Europe (3)
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R510:394 - The Peoples and Cultures of Central Asia (3)
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R510:399 - Tudor-Stuart England (3)
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R510:401 - Topics in European History (3)
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R510:402 - History of Spain and Portugal (3)
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R510:403 - Topics on Social History (3)
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R510:404 - Topics in Intellectual History (3)
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R510:433 - Topics in Islamic History (3)
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R510:435 - Topics in Medieval and Early Modern History (3)
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R510:458 - Topics in Women's History (3)
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R510:461 - Topics in Comparative History (3)
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R510:497 - Honors Project: History (3)
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R510:499 - Individual Study in Historical Research, Non-American(BA) (null)
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R512:201-202 - Development of the United States (3,3)
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R512:303 - Topics in the History of Newark (3)
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R512:311 - Colonial America (3)
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R512:318 - Labor History (3)
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R512:330 - History of American Immigration (3)
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R512:337 - History of the Family in the United States (3)
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R512:343 - The Creation of the American Republic (3)
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R512:344 - The Democratic Age in American History: 1820 - 1880 (3)
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R512:349 - Antebellum Reform Movements (3)
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R512:367 - The Age of the Corporation: 1880?1920 (3)
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R512:368 - Modern America (3)
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R512:369 - America in World War II and the Postwar Period (3)
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R512:371 - Contemporary America (3)
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R512:383 - United States Foreign Policy in the Era of the Cold War (3)
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R512:402 - Topics in American Intellectual History (3)
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R512:403 - Topics in American Political History (3)
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R512:404 - Topics in American Business and Economic History (3)
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R512:405 - Topics in the History of Science (3)
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R512:408 - Topics in American Social and Cultural History (3)
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R512:410 - Topics in the History of American Foreign Policy and Diplomacy (3)
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R512:438 - Internship: Administration of Historical Manuscripts (3)
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R512:452 - Topics in Legal History (3)
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R512:462 - Topics in Recent American History (3)
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R512:472 - Topics in Afro-American History (3)
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R512:473 - Topics in Women's History (3)
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R512:499 - Readings in American History (3)
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GRADUATE COURSES:

Hist 620 - City and Disease in History (3 credits)
Explores the dynamic interaction between the growth of cities and changes in the experience and location of disease. Presumes the intertwining of these two historical developments in the birth of a distinctly urban identity, one predicated on the notion that the modern city is somehow inherently diseased. Focuses on the New York and Newark metropolitan areas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics considered are epidemic outbreaks, quarantines, the technology and organization of sanitation and hygiene, the professional formation of public, industrial and occupational medicine, and medical and popular responses to immigration.

Hist 622 - Culture and Science in the History of American Medicine (3 credits)
Provides an overview of American medical history and a familiarity with the theoretical and practical ramifications of different approaches to the complex relationships between medicine, science, and culture. Topics include: the extent to which medicine is or has been scientific; reasons why science has been considered so important to medicine's professional culture; and the degree to which medicine's professional culture has been shaped by science as well as other factors, such as economic and political self-interest, technology, class, race, gender, and other kinds of cultural values.

Hist 624 - Technology, Environment and Medicine in World History, 1500-1900 (3 credits)
Examines the interrelationship between the emerging modern world system and changes in technology, environment, and medicine, with particular emphasis on European overseas expansion and its impact in non-Western regions.

Hist 626 - Social History of American Medicine Since 1800 (3 credits)
Topics include the practices of 19th-century regular medicine; the relation between medical concepts and mainstream social thought; the treatment of women's health; antebellum alternative healers and alternative politics; the triumphs of late 19th- and early 20th-century medical therapeutics; the emergence of medicine as big business; medicine and racism; the emergence of nursing as a profession; modern medicine in an international perspective; New Age healing; the AIDS crisis and AIDS activism; and contemporary debates on the future of health care in the United States.

Hist 628 - Gender, Science and Technology in the Modern World (3 credits)
Introduction to a wide range of political and cultural analyses of science and technology, with an emphasis on recent feminist critiques of science. Explores the questions of scientific neutrality; the gendering of scientific knowledge; the relationship between science, technology, and capitalism; the role of science in international politics; and why science has not freed women.

Hist 630 - History of the Body in Modern Western Culture (3 credits)
Considers medical or scientific history primarily in terms of implications for bodily experience in everyday life. Begins with grand narratives of historical shifts in bodily perceptions and practices, and proceeds to more focused narratives of changing bodily experience, engaging key distinctions between genders, classes, and species as well as perceptions of pain and internal bodily structure. Materials will be drawn from early modern and modern Europe, as well as more recent bodily experience in the United States.

Hist 632 - Technology, Culture and History (3 credits)
Treats the relationship between technology and cultural values in a variety of historical and geographical settings, from early modern Japan to twentieth-century America. Examines the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life.

Hist 634 - Environmental History of North America (3 credits)
Explores the dialogue between humankind and the environment in North America over the course of the last four centuries. Examines the latest and most interesting work done in the new field of environmental history to see what such a perspective has to offer.

Hist 635 - History of Technology, Environment and Medicine: Theory and Method (3 credits)
A team-taught course which surveys the methods employed in the three fields. Explores the interdisciplinary nature of each field, and the value of interdisciplinary scholarship.

Hist 637 - Global Environmental History (3 credits)
This course takes a global view of human interaction with the natural world, mixing broad themes such as colonialism and industrialization with detailed case studies in an effort ot understand the ways that people and the environment have mutually shaped one another. Because environmental change often transcends national boundaries, this course places important subjects in environmental history such as disease, agriculture, pollution, and environmentalism into a global and transnational context. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 638 - Social History of Communication (3 credits)
Treats selected themes in the history of communication in different social and cultural contexts, from the ancient world to the twentieth century. Topics include: orality, proto-literacy, and literacy in ancient and medieval cultures; printing and the development of print culture in the early modern world; the ?communication revolution? of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and historiographical debates over the role of communication technologies in society.

Hist 640 - The Urban Environment (3 credits)
Examines the role of the economy, culture, and technology in shaping the urban environment. Makes extensive use of Newark and the New York metropolitan area, including field observations and local research. In addition to other topics, explores in detail spatial relationships, the role of transportation, and the development of suburbia.

Hist 642 - The History of Health and International Development (3 credits)
This course examines the history of western efforts to promote health and nutrition in the 'developing world" from the beginnings of tropical medicine. We will trace this history through its many permutations from the establishment of colonial health services to the development of the Global Programme on AIDS. In doing so, we will explore the various economic and political interests and underlying cultural assumptions that have shaped the development of ideas and practices associated with international health and development.

Hist 644 - War, Technology and Society, 1500-1914 (3 credits)
Examines key themes in the interrelationship between warfare, technology and society from the beginnings of modern warfare until World War I. Primary emphasis placed on the historical connections between violent conflict, the technical means by which it is carried out, and the socio-political environment within which wars take place. The effect of technology upon war and considerations of the effect of war on technological change and development. Samples the rich tradition of thought and ideas produced by philosophers and theorists on these themes.

Hist 645 - American Legal History to 1860 (3 credits)
Readings and discussion on the legacy of common law after the Revolution; the emergence of legal instrumentalism; and the evolution of tort, contract, and damages in the context of industrialism and economic growth. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 650 - History of American Conservatism (3 credits)
This course examines postwar American conservatism through classic works and contemporary studies. Topics include the rise of conservatism, groups under the conservative umbrella, and the rise of the right as related to key events in postwar history (Cold War, McCarthysim, the '60s, the suburbs and urban change). Course interrogates postwar conservatism with respect to American political and intellectual history and in relation to histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, place and religion. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 652 - Topics in the History of Technology (3 credits)
Selected topics in the history of technology. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 653 - Topics in European Intellectual & Cultural History (3 credits)
Examination of issues and methods in European intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 654 - Topics in American Intellectual & Cultural History (3 credits)
Examination of issues and methods in American intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 655 - Topics in American Urban and Ethnic History (3 credits)
Examination of issues and methods in American urban and ethnic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 656 - Topics in the History of Health (3 credits)
Selected topics in the history of Health. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 657 - Topics in Environmental History (3 credits)
Selected topics in environmental history. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 658 - Topics in American Legal History (3 credits)
Readings and discussion on the growth of legal formalism, the evolution of substantive due process, changes in legal education and the legal profession, and the evolution of private law. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 660 - The Enlightenment in Britain (3 credits)
The 18th century was the age of the Enlightenment. Great Britain became a unified polity and the most powerful imperial force in the world. We examine the Enlightenment in Britain against the backdrop of war and empire, imperial consumer culture, the growth and significance of sociability and politeness, representations of gender, the writing of cultural history, social uses of science/technology, print culture, and competition among varying notions of ethnic identity. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 661 - Problems & Readings in European History since 1850 (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in European history since 1850. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 662 - Prob. & Read: Hist/US Foreighn Policy and Diplomacy (3 credits)
Examination of issues and methods in American diplomatic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 663 - Problems & Readings in American History, 1492-1789 (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history rom 1492 to 1789. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 664 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1789-1865 (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1789 to 1865. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 665 - Problems & Readings in American History, 1865-1914 (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1865 to 1914. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 666 - Problems & Readings in American History, 1890-1945 (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literatue in American history from 1890 to 1945. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 667 - Problems & Readings in American History, 1945-Present (3 credits)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history since 1945. Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisite: permission of graduate history advisor. For students writing a master's thesis in the history of technology, environment and medicine.

Hist 702 - Master's Essay (3 credits)
For those who don't write a 6 credit thesis, the 3 credit Master's Essay caps the M.A./M.A.T. A substantial work done with an advisor, may be: 1. Interpretive historical essay based on primary source research. 2. Narrative history based on primary source research. Prereq: R510:504, R510:505, or R510:506. 3. Historiographical essay. 4. Content-focused curriculum design, either a course or significant portion thereof. 5. Design for an historical museum exhibition/other work in public history. Prereq: R510:565 Effective From: Fall 2010

Hist 725, Hist 726, Hist 727 - Independent Study in History (3 credits)
Prerequisites: permission of graduate history advisor and course instructor.

Hist 791 - Seminar in History of Technology, Environment and Medicine (Non-credit)
Faculty, students and invited speakers present and discuss current topics of research in history, technology and medicine.

R510:520 - Topics in the History of Technology (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:525 - Colloquium in the History of Women (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:526 - Problems and Readings in Afro-American History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:547 - Comparative World Colonialism (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:548 - Topics in the History of the American Environment (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:559 - Cities in Change I (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:560 - Cities in Change II (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:566 - American Historiography (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:569 - American Legal History to 1860 (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:570 - Topics in American Legal History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:571 - Introduction to Historical Method (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:572 - Philosophy of History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:576 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1492-1789 (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:577 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1789-1865 (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:581 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1865-1912 (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:583 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1912-1945 (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:585 - Problems and Readings in American History, 1945 to Present (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:618 - Seminar: Teaching of History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:669 - Business and Government in the Twentieth Century I (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:670 - Business and Government in the Twentieth Century II (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:695 - Individual Studies in History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.

R510:696 - Advanced Individual Studies in History (3 credits)
For more details go to Rutgers Catalog.