CATALOG HOME | UNDERGRADUATE | GRADUATE | DISTANCE LEARNING | ADMISSIONS | REGISTRAR | NJIT | CATALOG ARCHIVE
evsc
Environmetal Science :   Offered by the Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

EvSc 125 - Fundamentals of Environmental Sciences (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Chem 125 with grade C or better, R120:101 with grade C or better. An introductory course that will present freshman EvSc students with general concepts and topics on Environment, including chemistry, ecosystems, geological and soil resources, water quality, agricultural and Environment, atmosphere, noise and ionizing radiation. Effective From: Fall 2013

EvSc 325 - Energy and Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Chem 125 with a grade C or better and Phy 111 with grade C or better. An advanced course to instruct EvSc students, topics on energy and environmental issues such as introduction to energy, natural energy conservation, environmental issues of energy production and consumption, regulation and legislation related to energy, public policy development in energy and environment. Effective From: Spring 2012

EvSc 335 - Environmental Law (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Hum 102 with a grade of C or better. The prerequisite is a college ability to communicate competently in the English language including the ability to research and prepare essay compositions and to articulate the major points in a presentation format. The introduction to Environmental Law will cover the regulatory system developed over time that has forged a complex system of environmental rules influencing industrial and other private and public actions that impact the environment. The course will review these rules from the vantage point of the practicing technical environmental engineer and scientist. Students will become familiar with the background and derivation of these laws as well as the major operational features such as environmental permits and enforcement. Several major environmental cases will be analyzed that give definition to the key features of these laws. Each class module will direct itself to the practical application of these laws. Effective From: Fall 2012

EvSc 375 - Environmental Biology (3-0-3)
An introductory ecological approach to understanding man's impact and dependence on the natural environment. Broad topics include ecosystems, nutrient cycles, pollution, pest management, conservation of natural resources, energy, and human population. Effective From: Spring 2006

EvSc 381 - Geomorphology (3-0-3)
This is a course in geomorphology, the study of landforms and the contemporary processes that create and modify them. The course will emphasize earth surface processes and quantitative analysis of landform change. Lectures will stress geomorphic principles and two field-based problems will enable students to apply these principles to contemporary geomorphic problems in engineering and management with a focus on the natural environment. Effective From: Fall 2010

EvSc 385 - Environmental Microbiology (3-0-3)
The main goals of this course are to present an overview of the important microbes involved in environmental microbiology, to discuss the environments where they are found, to learn how they are detected and monitored, and to describe their effects on humans. Traditional lectures and exams will be supplemented with discussions of experimental design and data interpretation by reading current research articles. Effective From: Spring 2006

EvSc 391 - Research and Independent Study (3-0-3)
Provides an opportunity to work on a research project under the individual guidance of a member of the department. Effective From: Fall 2008

EvSc 416 - Environmental Toxicology (3-0-3)
The course is intended to explore the general principles of toxicology and apply them to the assessment of acute, subacute and chronic effects of hazardous and toxic chemicals. Qualitative and quantitative measures of toxicity and testing protocols are addressed. The role of toxicology in risk assessment and risk management is discussed. Effective From: Spring 2006

EvSc 484 - Environmental Analysis (2-2-3)
The analysis of environmental samples is studied from the acquisition of representative samples, through sample handling, chain of custody, sample storage, analytical method selection, analysis, and data treatment. Effective From: Fall 2006

EvSc 492H - Honors Research and Independent Study II (3-0-3)
Provides an opportunity to work on a research project under the individual guidance of a member of the department. Effective From: Fall 2008

GRADUATE COURSES:

EvSc 592 - Graduate Work Experience (3 additive credits)
Prerequisite: permission of the associate chairperson for environmental science and the Division of Career Development Services. Provides on-the-job reinforcement of environmental science assignments. Projects are developed by the co-op office in consultation with the associate chairperson for environmental science. Cannot be used for degree credit.

EvSc 593 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience IV (0 credits)
Prerequisites: One immediately prior 3-credit registration for graduate co-op work experience with the same employer. Requires approval of departmental co-op advisor and the Division of Career Development Services. Must have accompanying registration in a minimum of 3 credits of course work. Effective From: Fall 2006

EvSc 600 - Environmental Science Seminar (Non-credit)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Current environmental topics of interest to the environmental professional are presented. Required every semester for environmental science graduate students receiving departmental or research-based awards and for all doctoral students.

EvSc 602 - Special Topics in Environmental Science I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: approval of graduate advisor in environmental science. Topics of current interest in the environmental field.

EvSc 603 - Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (3 credits)
Explores the safe operation of hazardous waste sites as well as emergency responses to hazardous releases. Overview of OSHA regulations and NIOSH standards concerning toxicological hazards and medical surveillance requirements. Emphasis on recognition and monitoring of site hazards. A written health and safety plan, and participation in a group problem involving a simulated hazardous site entry using actual protective equipment is required. Course satisfies the regulatory compliance mandates to meet 29 CFR 1910.120 for OSHA, with certification valid for one year.

EvSc 610 - Environmental Chemical Science (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Principles of physical, inorganic and organic chemistry are applied to understanding the origins of environmental pollutants, their transport, distribution and decomposition pathways.

EvSc 611 - Hazardous Waste Management (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. An overview of hazardous waste management; case histories; legislation and regulations; treatment, disposal and cleanup technologies; sampling and analysis methodology; persistence and fate in the environment; emergency response procedures.

EvSc 612 - Environmental Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. The analysis of environmental samples is studied from the acquisition of representative samples, through sample handling, chain of custody, sample storage, analytical method selection, analysis, and data treatment.

EvSc 613 - Environmental Problem Solving (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. This course is designed to study solutions for current environmental problems. Students are asked to respond to an imaginary Request for Proposal (RFP) in writing and before a team of technical experts at an oral presentation. Solutions proposed in student RFPs must reflect knowledge of environmental science and technology in current use.

EvSc 614 - Quantitative Environmental Risk Assessment (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. Applications ofquantitative risk assessment concepts to the management of environmental problems.

EvSc 615 - Global Environmental Problems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. With an understanding that environmental problems are not restricted by geographical boundaries, relationships of the earth's temperature balance, global air circulation patterns, global energy needs, and control and remediation technologies are studied.

EvSc 616 - Toxicology for Engineers and Scientists (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing. The general principles of toxicology are presented and applied to the assessment of acute, subacute and chronic effects of hazardous and toxic chemicals. Qualitative and quantitative measures of toxicity and testing protocols are addressed. The role of toxicology in risk assessment and risk management is discussed.

EvSc 617 - Mass Spectrometry and Interpretation of Mass Spectra (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CHEM125 and CHEM126 or equivalent. Historical background, fundamentals and mechanics of operation for components incorporated into modern Mass Spectrometers: vacuum system, ion sources, mass filter, ion detection, plus computer operation and data collection. Explanation and interpretation of mass spectra and fragmentation patterns are a fundamental theme throughout the course. Lecture material includes principles of operation and appropriate applications for modern types of mass spectrometers: magnetic sector, quadrupole, time of flight, ion trap, FT-ICR. Theory and applications of electron impact, chemical, electrospray, and other ionization techniques including atmospheric sampling are covered. High resolution analysis using magnetic sector and FT - ion cyclotron instruments. Analytical applications in environmental, petroleum and biochemical analysis and applications and coupling of mass spectrometry with other instruments (GC, LC, AES,) are illustrated.

EvSc 624 - Environmental Analysis Methods and Laboratory (3 credits)
Basic theory, methods, instruments, and data interpretation for chemical analysis of environmental samples are described in lectures and used in the laboratory; sampling; sample preparation; quality assurance, chain of custody. Instrument methods and uses include: UV-VIS, FTIR, AA, HPLC, GC, Ion Chromatography, and Mass Spectrometry as applied to environmental samples.

EvSc 625 - Social Dimensions of Risk (3 credits)
Low-probability/high consequence events involving terrorism, food safety, and extreme weather offer ample evidence the prevalent approaches of economics and statistics are not able to deal with the complex ways that risk permeates modern societies. This course treats risk analysis as a broad interdisciplinary activity and draws on the full range of the social sciences to explore the multifaceted way that risk infuses itself into the fabric of contemporary affairs. Effective From: Spring 2007

EvSc 626 - Hydrogeology (3 credits)
This course covers the principles of ground water flow, advanced water cycle properties, aquifer flow and aquifer recharge. Contaminant migration and remediation methods are discussed. Basic groundwater chemistry and quality is covered. Effective From: Spring 2008

EvSc 627 - Environmental Microbiology (3 credits)
Prerequisites: R120:101, R120:102, (General Biology I and II) or permission of instructor. This course offers an overview of 1) basic microbiology: biochemical principles, cell structure organization, microbial nutrition and growth, 2) the important microbes involved in environmental microbiology and address the environments where they are found, and 3) how they are detected and monitored, and their effects on humans, and the environment. Traditional lectures and exams are supplemented with discussions of current research articles. Effective From: Fall 2010

EvSc 700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate standing and approval of the graduate advisor in environmental science. Written report requiring experimental or theoretical research, or an extensive literature analysis. Registration must be approved by an advisor. Students must continue to register for 3 credits each semester until completion and a written report is accepted. Only a total of 3 credits will count toward the degree.

EvSc 701 - Master's Thesis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for a master's degree in environmental science. Approval to register for the thesis must be obtained from the advisor. Original research under the supervision of a designated faculty member. The final product must be a written thesis approved by three faculty members: the student's primary advisor, another from the program and one other faculty member. Once registration for thesis has begun, a student must continue to register for a minimum 3 credits per semester until at least 6 credits have been completed and a written thesis is approved. Only a total of 6 credits will count toward the degree.

EvSc 702 - Special Topics in Environmental Science II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: approval of graduate advisor in environmental science. Topics of current interest in the environmental field.

EvSc 711 - Advanced Environmental Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EvSc 612 or equivalent. Analysis of complex environmental samples is studied, from the acquisition of representative samples, through sample handling, chain of custody, sample storage, analytical method selection, analysis and data handling. Collection and analysis of samples from air, water, soil, and biological systems will be discussed. Emphasis on the study of current literature.

EvSc 712 - Hazardous Substance Management (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Graduate standing. The course material comprises an overview of hazardous materials and hazardous waste management and control in an industrial setting. The course examines the technical approaches utilized in the control, remediation, and prevention of hazardous substances and waste. It also includes the major technical elements of federal regulations that govern operations involving the handling of hazardous materials. Effective From: Fall 2012

EvSc 715 - Energy and Sustainability (3-0-3)
This course comprises an interdisciplinary review of energy fundamentals including the basic principles necessary to understand energy systems. The technological and engineered systems for processing and using different energy non-renewable and renewable sources. The social and environmental consequences of energy production, distribution, and use, including a comparison of socioeconomic models of global energy applications. Effective From: Spring 2014

EvSc 717 - Mass Spectrometry and Mass Spectral Interpretation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CHEM125 and CHEM126 or equivalent. Chem 717 and Evsc 617 are comprised of Chem/Evsc 617 plus a research project: Research projects usually comprise experimental and mass spectrometry interpretation studies. These can be performed at NJIT or in the students corporate mass spectrometry facility. Projects may also include theory, data interpretation or literature reviews pertinent to a current active area in mass spectrometry research. Projects should be approved or in consult with the instructors.

EvSc 725 - Independent Study I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: written permission from the Associate Chairperson for Environmental Science plus courses prescribed by the supervising faculty member (who is not the student's thesis advisor). This special course covers areas of study in which one or more students may be interested, but which are not sufficiently broad to warrant a regular course offering. Students may not register for this course more than once with the same supervising faculty member.

EvSc 726 - Independent Study II (3 credits)
See description for EvSc 725.

EvSc 790 - Doctoral Dissertation (Credits as designated)
Required of all students working toward the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. A minimum of 36 credits is required. Approval of dissertation advisor is necessary for registration. Candidates must register for at least 6 credits of dissertation per semester until 36 credits are reached, and 3 credits per semester thereafter until a written dissertation is approved.

EvSc 791 - Graduate Seminar (Non-credit)
Required of all environmental science graduate students receiving departmental or research-based awards and all doctoral students. The student must register each semester until completion of the degree. Outside speakers and department members present their research for general discussion.