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Environmental Policy Studies:   Offered by the Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

EPS 202 - Society, Technology, and the Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: HUM 101. Uses case studies to examine the relationships between the creation and use of technologies, the human and natural environment, and the development of social and cultural institutions. Its central theme is the manner in which human society structures the environment in which it lives: nature and culture, city and country, civilization and development. This course satisfies 3 credits of the Basic Social Sciences GUR. Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Spring 2007

EPS 312 - Technology and Policy in Contemporary America (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. A study of technology and politics in recent America. Focuses on the role of the federal government in shaping technology, especially through funding technological innovations and applications. Topics will include the origins of technology policy in World War II, the influence of the Cold War, the science and technology policy advisory system, and political and cultural influences on technology policy. Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Fall 2008

EPS 313 - Environmental History and Policy (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. Covers the rise of the modern environmental debate, and examines its current priorities and values, politics and economics, and impacts on industry and society. Students review the role of regulatory agencies, private industry, public interest groups, and the media. Current major issues in New Jersey are considered, as well as environmental debate on a national and global level. Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Fall 2008

EPS 360 - Ethics and the Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. An examination of contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. An analysis of the ethical presuppositions and value principles underlying environmental policy. The study of ethical theories and their application to the environmental crisis. Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Fall 2008

EPS 362 - Environmental Economics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202, SS 201 or their equivalents. Presents a detailed overview of the relationship between political economy and the environment. Draws on diverse case studies including global warming, harvesting of minerals on the ocean's floor, destruction of old growth forests, and contamination of the -nation's water, air, and soils. Explores the economic remedies to the fast-changing relationship between society and nature. Honors Note: See HSS 101. Effective From: Fall 2008

EPS 380 - Policy Issues in the Coastal Environment (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents. An examination of coastal environments from the standpoint of the scientist, the engineer, and the resource manager. Topics include beach and shoreline characteristics, technological innovations to address coastal erosion problems, and current debates in coastal policy and resource management. Case studies are used to illustrate coastal management practices and the scientific, technical, and social constraint to policy formulation. Effective From: Fall 2008

EPS 381 - Field Techniques and Research (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: HUM 101, HSS 202 or their equivalents; two from HSS 211, HSS 212, Hist 213 or their equivalents.; STS 307. An introduction to research methods. The objectives of the course are to provide opportunity to pursue specialized, in-depth research in a subfield of science, technology and society of the student's choice; to develop skills in problem identification, research design and problem solving; to increase familiarity with methods of data analysis; to strengthen library research skills; to provide an opportunity to gather original field data in a team-oriented environment; and to improve oral and written communication skills. Effective From: Fall 2008

GRADUATE COURSES:

EPS 601 - Research Methods for Environment & Sustainability Policy (3 credits)
Introduces the research methods necessary to conduct studies in environmental and sustainability policy. Topics covered include literature review, problem identification, hypothesis testing, and quantitative methods of data analysis and problem solving. Students are required to implement and present their independently designed projects.

EPS 602 - Research Analysis for the Social and Policy Sciences (3 credits)
Prerequisite: EPS 601. Distribution of social, political, economic and health-related data in both samples and populations using a general linear model with residuals. Test hypotheses using both the Fisher and Neyman-Pearson criteria. Use of software such as SPSS, Microsoft Excel and Resampling Stats. to develop and test models using correlation, regression and ANOV techniques.

EPS 606 - Technology Forecasting and Management Planning (3 credits)
Prerequisite: quantitative background in science, social science, or engineering. Basic forecasting techniques such as regression analysis, scenario generating, Delphi conferencing, and morphological analysis with particular case studies and problems pertaining to the forecasting of technological development. The relation of technological forecasting to the management process and the understanding of the technological development process. Demonstration of techniques and application to the contemporary fields of technological importance such as energy, communications, transportation, housing, and computers. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 609 - Environmental Risk Assessment (3 credits)
Methodology to assess the social and economic risks to present-day environmental resources of air and water; cost-benefit and trade-off analysis; technical characteristics of materials such as half-life, decomposition rates, and temperature sensitivity; and probabilities of various environmental situations.

EPS 612 - Introduction to Environmental Policy Studies (3 credits)
Introduction to six areas essential to a comprehensive understanding of environmental policy: concept of environmental policy; tools (law, economics, planning, science, engineering, ethics) for environmental policy; the U.S. perspective (NEPA, clean air and water acts, CERCLA); the international perspective (Club of Rome models, 1972 UNEP, 1992 Rio); industrial perspective (pollution prevention/life cycle engineering, privatization); and the local perspective (New Jersey DEP, NGOs, local industry, shoreline.) Same as MIP 612.

EPS 613 - Environmental History and Policy (3 credits)
Explores the dialogue between humanity and the environment in the United States, as well as its global implications. Surveys fundamental themes of history and policy from an environmental perspective: colonial development, independence, western expansion, industrialization, urbanization, and the rise of a consumer society. Gives special attention to the emergence of an environmental perspective: wilderness appreciation, the conservation movement, public health, the rise of the environmental movement since the 1960s, environmental science, and the legislative and regulatory process.

EPS 614 - Environmental Economics & Management (3 credits)
Overviews the complex and dynamic interactions between the economy and the environment from biological, economic, and institutional perspectives and investigates various strategies for resolving conflicts in resource management and pollution control. Topics include the basic principles of risk assessment, cost benefit analysis, and cost-effectiveness analysis in environment management and assessment of contemporary environment politics in air and water pollution control and waste and toxics management. Effective From: Fall 2012

EPS 615 - The Politics of Science (3 credits)
Geopolitical context in which scientific discovery and governmental science policy have been formulated since World War II: social construction and the constituencies that have a stake in its outcome; military influence on science policy priorities; and legislative obstacles to various science policy objectives. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 616 - Global Problem Solving in Science, Technology, and the Environment (3 credits)
Developing policy for the global era. Analyses and theories on political concept of sovereign nation states; the earth as one integrated economy, technology, science, politics and ecology; multinational corporations; worldwide patterns of capital and labor migration; energy flows; technology transfer; and impact of modernization and development on ecology. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 622 - Sustainable Politics & Policy (3 credits )
Identifies the origins of the concept of sustainability development and institutional efforts to implement strategies at various geopolitical scales: international, national, regional, and local. The course introduces tools to measure progress toward sustainability through the use of metrics such as ecological footprint analysis and life-cycle analysis. Other topics include steady-state economics, sustainable systems of production and consumption, and sustainability transitions.

EPS 630 - Technology, Engineering and Civilization (3 credits)
Technological development and technical innovation dating from the ancient world, medieval Europe, to the modern era, with emphasis on Western civilization. Comparisons of the United States, Europe, China and Japan. Major themes include the role of the military and war, proto-industrialization and industrial revolution, technology transfer, emergence of engineering as an occupational class, and the place of the United States as the world's premier technological nation. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 634 - Professional Ethics (3 credits)
Professional ethics: its source, range, and limits. Ethical thought and behavior in Western tradition and culture as they apply to business, engineering, and government. By studying both theoretical arguments and practical, real-life case studies, students learn to recognize, analyze and evaluate the ethics of personal professional decisions about work, careers, and policies. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 638 - Physical Geography (3)
Understanding the interaction between humans and the physical environment is important to the formulation of sound environmental policy. The course examines processes that shape the physical environment, the influence of human activities on these processes and the physical environment, and the application of this information to solving environmental problems.

EPS 642 - Urban Environmental Policy Studies (3 credits)
Critical evaluation and formulation of environmental policy as it affects urban setting. History and theory of environmental policy. How the U.S. legal structure shapes environmental regulation and its administration. Shifting environmental policy paradigms. Case study analyses focusing on urban settings. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 644 - The Rhetoric of Environmental Policy (3 credits)
Introduces students to the major types of rhetorical analysis as well as assures that students can analyze and write technology policy that is informed by core rhetorical principles of that analysis.

EPS 651 - Introduction to Urban and Environmental Health (3 credits)
Health problems associated with the social and psychological factors found in urban areas and health problems stemming from contamination of air, water, food, the work place and other special environments. Policies required to promote healthful living behavior and those required to regulate negative externalities.

EPS 660 - Ethics and Environmental Policy (3 credits)
Contemporary environmental problems from the perspective of ethics or moral philosophy. Is there a moral obligation to preserve or protect the natural environment? What are the ethical presumptions and values underlying environmental policy? Are traditional theories of moral philosophy applicable to contemporary environmental problems, or is a new conception of the relationship between humanity and nature needed?

EPS 698/EPS 699 - Special Topics in Environmental & Sustainability (3 credits each)
Course considers advanced topics of special or current interest related to environmental and sustainability policy. Effective From: Fall 2012

EPS 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for the master's degree, advisor's and departmental approval. Projects involving fieldwork, experimental, or theoretical investigation carried out under the supervision of a designated member of the departmental faculty. The completed thesis should be of a quality as to warrant publication, in whole or in part, in a professional journal. A minimum of 3 credits per semester is required until completion.

EPS 702 - Special Topics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Approval of graduate advisor in Environmental Science. Topics of current interest in the field of environmental policy. Doctoral level course. Effective From: Spring 2006

EPS 711 - Environmental Policy: Corporate Approach and Organization (3 credits)
Explores corporate and business advocacy approaches to influencing and responding to environmental policy and regulation from organizational, historic and strategic perspectives. Effective Until: Fall 2011

EPS 712 - Advanced Studies in Environmental & Sustainability Policy (3 credits)
Evaluates strategies to reduce energy and material throughput including eco-efficiency relocalization of production and consumption, and green consumerism. Also considered are debates surrounding innovative policies to foster work-time reduction, to develop alternative measures of well-being, and to include societal values shifts. Effective From: Fall 2012

EPS 714 - Environmental and Natural Resources Economics (3 credits)
Examines environmental regulation of firms and natural resource use with emphasis on the theoretical foundations required for public policy. Students focus primarily on the application of economic tools to improve environmental quality.

EPS 725 - Independent Study I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for the master's degree, advisor's and departmental approval. Projects not within the scope of existing courses are carried out under the supervision of a designated member of the departmental faculty.

EPS 726 - Independent Study II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for the master's degree, advisor's and departmental approval. Projects not within the scope of existing courses are carried out under the supervision of a designated member of the departmental faculty.

EPS 761 - Ethics and Environmental Policy II (3 credits)
Presents a detailed investigation of the ethical bases of environmental policy decisions. Examines both theoretical philosophical arguments and practical case studies. Effective Until: Fall 2011