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Computer and Information Science:   CCS Departments: Department of Computer Science, Department of Information Systems and the Information Technology Program

**These courses descriptions are for archival purposes. These courses have been reclassified as either Computer Science, CS, or Information Systems, IS, courses and their course descriptions are found under those classifications.**

 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

CIS 098 - Fundamentals of Computers and Programming (2-1-2)
Prerequisite: recommendation of the CIS department. A fundamentals course for potential CIS majors who have little or no background in computers and programming and who need additional preparation before entering CIS 113. Topics include: the attributes of hardware and software, interacting with an operating system, information representation and binary arithmetic, document preparation with word processing software, algorithms and flow diagramming. Extensive practice in programming fundamentals in a high level language is included. (This course, by itself, will not satisfy the CIS 100-level course requirement.) Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 101*** - Computer Programming and Problem Solving (2-1-2)
An introductory course in computer science, and programming in a high-level language (such as FORTRAN, C, etc.) and its use in solving engineering and scientific problems. The emphasis is on the logical analysis of a problem and the formulation of a computer program leading to its solution. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, with applications. Designed for students not specializing in computer science. For students taking a minor in CIS or changing to a CIS major, a combination of department approval and CIS 105 and CIS 101 may be substituted for CIS 113. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 101H*** - Honors Computer Programming and Problem Solving (2-1-2)
Prerequisite: departmental approval and/or permission of the director of the Honors College. This course covers the same material as CIS 101 but in greater depth. Designed for students not specializing in computer science.

CIS 102 - Computer Science with Problem Solving (3-1-3)
An introductory course in computer science, with applications to engineering and technology problems. Emphasis on programming methodology using a high level language as the vehicle to illustrate concepts. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, with applications. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 103*** - Computer Science with Business Problems (3-1-3)
An introductory course in computer science, with applications to business and managerial decision making. Emphasis on programming methodology using the COBOL language as the vehicle to illustrate concepts. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and abstraction, with applications. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 104*** - Computer Programming and Graphics Problems (2-1-2)
Corequisite: Math 138. An introductory course in computer science with applications in computer graphics for architecture. Emphasis on programming methodology using a high level language (such as Pascal, C, etc.) as the vehicle to illustrate the concepts. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, with applications. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 104H*** - Honors Computer Programming and Graphics Problems (2-1-2)
Prerequisite: departmental approval and/or permission of the director of the Honors College. Corequisite: Math 138. This course covers the same material as CIS 104, but in greater depth.

CIS 105 - Computer Programming (1-1-1)
Prerequisite: 100-level GUR course in CIS. Details of programming in one particular computer language. Problems will be coded and run on a computer. Languages include ADA, APL, C, C++, FORTRAN, LISP, MODULA-2, Pascal, PROLOG, or others. May be repeated for credit when a different language is used. Students may repeat CIS 105 with different, department approved languages, and may combine three one-credit courses (including CIS 305) to be used as a technical elective in a CIS degree program. For students taking a minor in CIS or changing to a CIS major, a combination of an approved CIS 105 and CIS 101 may be substituted for CIS 113.

CIS 110 - Introduction to Computer Science IA (3-0-3)
First semester of a two course sequence, equivalent to CIS 113. Introduces fundamentals of computer science, with emphasis on programming methodology and problem solving. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, including the development environment, native types, expressions, objects, classes, decisions, iteration, GUI based programming and methods. A high level language (Java) is fully discussed and serves as the vehicle to illustrate many of the concepts. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 110A - CIS 110A Computer Science Lab for CIS 111 ((0-1.5-1.5))
Laboratory module for the first course of the sequence equivalent to CIS 113. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 111 - Introduction to Computer Science IB (3-0-3)
Second semester of a two course sequence, equivalent to CIS 113. Introduces fundamentals of computer science, with emphasis on programming methodology and problem solving. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, including methods and classes, arrays, collections, inheritance and polymorphism, exceptions, recursion, threads, testing and debugging. A high level language (Java) is fully discussed and serves as the vehicle to illustrate many of the concepts. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 111A - CIS111A Computer Science Lab for CIS 111 ((0-1.5-1.5))
Laboratory module for the second course of the sequence equivalent to CIS 113. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 112 - Introduction to Computing (3-2-5)
This course is designed for talented high school students who are interested in computer science and/or are considering computer science as a major field of study for their future. Fundamentals of computer science are introduced. Emphasis is on programming methodology, problem solving, structure and representation of data. Topics include algorithm design, data abstraction, logical data structures (lists, stacks, queues, trees, etc.) physical representation of data, design and analysis of algorithms operating on the structures including internal searching, sorting, recursion and string processing. The course also covers program specifications, correctness and efficiency, and techniques for program development and debugging. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 113*** - Introduction to Computer Science (3-1-3)
Prerequisite:: CIS 098. Open only to science and liberal arts major. Fundamentals of computer science are introduced, with emphasis on programming methodology and problem solving. Topics include basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages and data abstraction, with applications. A high level language (such as Pascal, C, etc.) is fully discussed and serves as the vehicle to illustrate many of the concepts. CIS majors should enroll in CIS 113. Students who receive degree credit for CIS 113 may not receive degree credit for CIS 213. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 113H*** - Honors Introduction to Computer Science I (3-1-3)
Prerequisite: Satisfactory performance on placement exam and/or departmental approval. A course similar to CIS 113, but material is covered in greater depth. Honors students contemplating a major in computer science, or who plan to take advanced electives in computer science, should take CIS 113H instead of CIS 101H. Students who receive degree credit for CIS 113H cannot receive degree credit for CIS 213. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 114 - Introduction to Computer Science II (3-1-3)
Prerequisites:; CIS 113 or completion of a required 100 level GUR course in CIS, plus an approved CIS 105. A study of advanced programming topics with logical structures of data, their physical representation, design and analysis of computer algorithms operating on the structures, and techniques for program development and debugging. Course covers program specifications, correctness and efficiency, data abstraction, basic aspects of simple data structures, internal searching and sorting, recursion and string processing. Algorithmic analysis is also discussed. Students receiving degree credit for CIS 114 cannot receive degree credit for CIS 335 or CIS 505. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 114H - Honors Introduction to Computer Science II (3-1-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 113H or department approval; A course similar to CIS 114, but material is covered in greater depth. Students receiving degree credit for CIS 114H cannot receive degree credit for CIS 335 or CIS 505. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 150 - Web Authoring and Development (2-2-3)
This course, designed for high school students, introduces the technologies and techniques of the Internet's World Wide Web. Covers basic issues of design and coding in HTML, the common language for Web development, including discussions on incorporating graphics, frames, and tables into pages. Also introduces the concepts of TCP/IP, HTTP protocols, Web architectures, and MIME types. Introduces FrontPage and Net Object Fusion. Effective Until: Spring 2006

CIS 151 - Advanced Web Development and Site Management (2-2-3)
Prerequisites: knowledge of windows, experience with any programming language, good knowledge of the Internet and HTML language. This course, designed for high school students, will introduce advanced technologies and techniques of the Internet's World Wide Web. Covers the use of Internet development tools, the use of server scripts, CGI and non-CGI related solutions to database access, server configuration, Internet protocols, proxy servers, security issues, and digital commerce. Effective Until: Spring 2006

CIS 213 - Introduction to Computer Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: 100-level GUR course in CIS. The course covers a study of the representation of data, its structures, and algorithms. Programming topics in Pascal and assembly language are included. Designed for students not majoring in computer science. Students receiving degree credit for CIS 213 cannot receive degree credit for CIS 113.

CIS 231 - Machine and Assembly Language Programming (3-1-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 113, or CIS 213, or completion of a required 100-level GUR course in CIS plus an approved CIS 105. Fundamentals of machine organization and machine language programming. Representation of computer instructions and data in machine, assembly and macro-assembly languages together with intensive practice in formulating programming, running, and debugging programs for both numerical and logical problems. Assemblers and loaders are discussed. Students receiving degree credit for CIS 231 cannot receive degree credit for CIS 510. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 240 - Principles of Bioinformatics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Math 211, R120:301, CIS 114 or permission of the instructor. This course provides an introduction to the field of bioinformatics. It includes a description of the molecular basis of genomics and proteomics, the computer-based and mathematical methods used in bioinformatics, and the application of these methods toward understanding biological systems at the cellular and molecular level. It also includes a description of the application of bioinformatics to drug discovery. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 241 - Foundations of Computer Science I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114, Math 112. An introduction to the foundations of computer science with emphasis on the development of techniques for the design and proof of correctness of algorithms and the analysis of their computational complexity. Reasoning techniques based on propositional and predicate logic and relational calculus operations with applications to databases will also be introduced. Auxiliary topics such as combinatorics of finite sets, functions and relations, and graph-theory definitions and graph storage alternatives will also be examined. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 245 - Information Technology Systems: Hardware/Software (3-0-3)
This course reviews hardware/software technologies in order to enable system developers to understand tradeoffs in the design of computer architectures for effective computer systems. Also covered are operating systems and systems architecture for networked computing systems. Topics include Hardware (CPU architecture, memory, registers, addressing modes, busses, instruction sets, multi processors versus single processors, and peripheral devices), Operating systems (processes, process management, memory and file system managaement), and Telecommunications (basic network components, switches, multiplexers and media, installation and configuration of multi-user operating systems). Effective From: Summer 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 251 - Computer Organization (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 113. An introduction to computer system structure and organization. Topics include representation of information, circuit analysis and design, register-transfer level, processor architecture and input/output. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 252 - Computer Organization and Architecture (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 113. An introduction to the organization and architecture of computer systems, beginning with the standard Von Neumann model and then moving forward to more recent architectural concepts. Among the topics covered are digital logic, data representation, assembly language organization, memory addressing schemes, memory systems, interfacing and functional organization. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 265 - Introduction to Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: 100-level Computer Science GUR course. Information systems is the study of how organizations use information technology. This course is an overview of the information systems discipline, the role of information systems in organizations, and the changing nature of information technology. Computer tools for analysis and presentation are used. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 270 - Multimedia Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Same as CIS 114. Multimedia combines text, graphics, sound, video, and animation in a single application. Preparation for creating multimedia information systems, and understanding the crucial issues involving technology, design and effectiveness of multimedia applications. Programming techniques for integrating video, sound, animation, and graphics, and design strategies for multimedia information systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 280 - Programming Language Concepts (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent. Conceptual study of programming language syntax, semantics and implementation. Course covers language definition structure, data types and structures, control structures and data flow, run-time consideration, and interpretative languages. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 288 - Intensive Programming Practicum (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent, CIS 280. The objective of this course is to raise the level of students' programming maturity by a combination of discussion of fundamental concepts and intensive practice in programming intermediate software applications. Students will use a modern development environment that offers comprehensive project management capabilities, and an appropriate programming language to develop their programs using object oriented and generic programming techniques. The course will be organized around a number of programming projects of intermediate size chosen by the faculty to illustrate a spectrum of programming development requirements and techniques. At least one project will be an introduction to programming of modern GUI applications. In addition students will be introduced to standard and commercial API's, class libraries and template libraries. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 305 - Community Service Internship (0-2-1)
Prerequisite: CIS 350. Increasingly, computer scientists are recognizing their ethical responsibility to provide advice and assistance that will improve the ability of government and social service agencies to use computers to serve the public. This course involves approximately 40 hours of internship in a community agency, arranged through the NJIT Cares Program. The interns will use their skills to improve the effectiveness of the use of computers at the agency. Bi-weekly progress reports will be submitted, with required meetings with the course supervisor, and a final report. (CIS 305 may be combined with two approved credits of CIS 105 and used as a technical elective in a CIS degree program.) Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 310 - Co-op Work Experience I (3)
Prerequisites: completion of the sophomore year, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated and approved by the Co-op office. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 332 - Principles of Operating Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent. Organization of operating systems covering structure, process management and scheduling; interaction of concurrent processes; interrupts; I/O, device handling; memory and virtual memory management and file management. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 332H - Honors Principles of Operating Systems (3-1-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent. A course similar to CIS 332, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 333 - Introduction to UNIX Operating Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 332 or equivalent and knowledge of C language. The course covers the UNIX system kernel including initialization, scheduling, context switching, process management, memory management, device management, and the file system. The course also includes the organization of shells, editors, utilities, and programming tools of the UNIX operating system. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 341 - Foundations of Computer Science II (3-0-0)
Prerequisites: CIS 241 or MATH 226 and CIS 280. This course provides an introduction to automata theory, computability theory, and complexity theory. Theoretical models such as finite state machines, push-down stack machines, and Turing machines are developed and related to issues in programming language theory. Also, the course covers undecidability and complexity theory, including the classes P and NP. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 341H - Honors Introduction to Logic and Automata (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS; CIS 280, Math 226 or Math 326. A course similar to CIS 341, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 350 - Computers and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS; one basic SS course; HSS 111. Examines the historical evolution of computer and information systems and explores their implications in the home, business, government, medicine and education. Topics include automation and job impact, privacy, and legal and ethical issues. Co-listed as STS 350. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 350H - Honors Computers and Society (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS; one basic SS course; HSS 111. A course similar to CIS 350, with a project of greater depth and scope.

CIS 352 - Parallel Computers and Programming (3-1-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 251 or CoE 252, CIS 332. A course introducing parallel computers and parallel programming. General structures and design techniques of parallel computers are described. Programming paradigms and algorithm design considerations for parallel processors will be discussed. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 353 - Advanced Computer Organization (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 251 or instructor approved equivalent. This course emphasizes the basic design principles of various components in a computer, as well as how the components are organized to build a computer. Topics include: design methodology, arithmetic and logic unit design, control unit design, memory hierarchy, memory system design, input and output devices, peripheral devices, and interfacing computers using software. A software simulation package is used to help the learning process. By the end of the semester, students will have built simulated computer. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 357 - Fundamentals of Network Security ((3-0-3))
This course offers an in depth study of network security issues, types of computer and network attacks, and effective defenses. It provides both a theoretical foundation in the area of security and hands-on experience with various attack tools, firewalls, and intrusion detection systems. Topics include: network scanning, TCP/IP stack fingerprinting, system vulnerability analysis, buffer overflows, password cracking, session hijacking, denial of service attacks, intrusion detection. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 365 - Computer Applications to Commercial Problems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 280, or CIS 114 and knowledge of COBOL. Covers design and implementation of commercial application software systems. Concepts of organization and management of data and files including file operations and organization of sequential access, relative access, indexed sequential access, virtual storage access and multi-key access methods. The COBOL language is used to illustrate these concepts and to implement application systems. The design and implementation of commercially oriented computer systems. Emphasis is placed on modern computers as a tool for solving business problems. The COBOL programming language will be extensively studied and utilized in developing the programming techniques for the solution of these problems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 370 - Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3-1-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114, Math 226. An exploration of concepts, approaches and techniques of artificial intelligence. Emphasizes both underlying theory and applications. Topics include knowledge representation, parsing language, search, logic, adduction, uncertainty, and learning. LISP and Prolog programming languages used extensively. Students are required to do programming assignments, complete a programming term project and review case studies. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 370H - Honors Introduction to Artificial Intelligence (3-1-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114, Math 226. A course similar to CIS 370, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 371 - Logic with Applications to Computer Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114; Math 211 and Math 226. An introduction to both the syntax and semantics (basic model theory) of first-order logic, covering one set of inference rules, sequent calculus or a tableau system and prove the completeness theorem for the proof system. You will also cover a relatively modern (and simpler) form of Incompleteness theorems and relate it to computational issues such as the halting problem, as well as issues related to automating logical reasoning. These will include Herbrand's theorem, resolution, and logic programming. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 371H - Honors Logic with Applications to Computer Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114; Math 211 and 226. A course similar to CIS 371, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 373 - World Wide Web Standards (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114 and junior standing. This course covers the standards that are emerging for formatting, accessing, displaying, transmitting and structuring information, including the standards and protocols existing and under development today. Topics include: Standards, Rationale, Pros and Cons, the Standards Process; Standards Bodies & Participating on Standards Bodies; How Companies Influence Standards; How Developers Incorporate Standards in their Programs; Planning for Emerging Standards; Company Policies Regarding Web Standards; Standards and Legal Issues. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 390 - Requirements Analysis and Systems Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114. A study of the information systems development life-cycle, from the initial stages of information requirements analysis and determination to the ultimate activities involving systems design. Theory, methodologies and strategies for information requirements analysis, including the assessment of transactions and decisions, fact-finding methodologies, structured analysis development tools, strategies of prototype development, and an overview of computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tools. Theory, methodologies and strategies for systems design, including design of user-interfaces, particularly menu-driven and keyword dialogue strategies, and issues in the proper design of computer output. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 392 - Text Processing, Retrieval & Mining (3-0-3 )
Prerequisites: CIS 114 and Math 333. Text retrieval concerns the representation, organization, storage, and retrieval of text elements. Students will learn methods of text and data organization, as well as numerical data storage methods in commercial databases. Topics include techniques such as automatic indexing, query expansion, and how to use these techniques to improve retrieval effectiveness and efficiency. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 405 - Internship in Community Service (1-0-1)
Prerequisite: CIS 305 or its equivalent, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Service Learning and Career Development Services. This course involves approximately 40 hours of internship in a community agency, arranged through the NJIT Cares Program. The interns will use their skills to improve the effectiveness of the use of computers at the agency. Bi-weekly progress reports will be submitted, with required meetings with the course supervisor, and a final report. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 408 - Cryptography and Internet Security (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Math 226. Covers security require-ments for telecommunication over the Internet and other communication networks, various conventional and public-key encryption protocols, digital encryption standard, RSA and ElGamal cryptographic systems, digital signature algorithm and analysis of its cryptoimmunity, and access sharing schemes. Students receiving credit for CIS 408 may not enroll in CIS 608. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 410 - Co-op Work Experience II (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 310 or its equivalent, approval of the department, and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience as co-op/internship. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of requirements that include a report and/or project. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 421 - Numerical Algorithms (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS. Corequisite: Math 222. This course deals with fundamentals of numerical methods, including discussion of errors, interpolation and approximation, linear systems of equations, solution of nonlinear equations, and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. The algorithmic approach and the efficient use of the computer are emphasized. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 431 - Database System Design and Management (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent. Database system architecture; data modelig using the entity-relationship model; storage of databases; the hierarchical, network and relational data models; formal and commercial query languages; functional dependencies and normalization for relational database design; relation decomposition; concurrency control and transactions management. Student projects involve the use of a DBMS package. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 431H - Honors Database System Design and Management (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or equivalent. A course similar to CIS 431, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 432 - Advanced Operating Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 251, CIS 332. A survey of the design and implementation of distributed operating systems, both by introducing basic concepts and considering examples of current systems. Topics include: communication, synchronization, processor allocation, and distributed file systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 433 - Electronic Commerce Requirements and Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 431; CIS 390 or CIS 490. Introduces critical concepts emerging in the field of electronic commerce, such as business to consumer (B2C), business to business (B2B), supply chain management (SCM) systems, and peer to peer (P2P). The course provides concepts and practical skills for building effective, usable, and secure electronic commerce systems, offering a conceptual framework for the study of electronic commerce as well as hands-on skills for building systems for electronic commerce. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 434 - Advanced Database Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 431. The course covers the basic concepts of traditional files and file processing, provides a "classic" introduction to the relational data model and its languages, and discusses database design methodology and application developments. Students are expected to learn the design of database application systems through a small project and to get some practical hands-on experience with commercial database management systems (DBMS) by writing application programs using the commercial DBMS query languages. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 434H - Honors Advanced Database Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 431. A course similar to CIS 434, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 435 - Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or CIS 335, and Math 226. Advanced topics in data structures and algorithms, including mathematical induction, analysis and complexity of algorithms, and algorithms involving sequences, sets, and graphs such as searching, sorting, order statistics, sequence comparisons, graph traversals, etc. Optional topics include geometric, algebraic, and numeric algorithms. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 435H - Honors Advanced Data Structures and Algorithm Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114 or CIS 335, and Math 226 and Math 333. A course similar to CIS 435, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 438 - Interactive Computer Graphics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level course in CIS, plus knowledge of Pascal or C. This course introduces fundamental concepts of interactive graphics oriented toward computer-aided design systems. Such systems emerge in engineering, architecture, and manufacturing. Topics include computer data structures for representation of two- and three-dimensional objects and algorithms for definition, modification, and display of these objects in applications. This course will also discuss a selection of special topics in interactive graphics. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 439 - Image Processing and Analysis (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114 and Math 333. This course is an intensive study of the fundamentals of image processing, analysis and understanding. Topics to be covered include: a brief review of the necessary mathematical tools, human visual perception, sampling and quantization, image transformation, enhancement, restoration, compression, reconstruction, image geometric transformation, matching, segmentation, feature extraction, representation and description, recognition and interpretation. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 439H - Honors Image Processing and Analysis (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 114 and Math 333. A course similar to CIS 439, with a project of greater depth and scope.

CIS 440 - Computer Vision (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Math 333. This course introduces basic concepts and methodologies of computer vision, and focuses on material that is fundamental and has a broad scope of applications. Topics include contemporary developments in all mainstream areas of computer vision e.g., Image Formation, Feature Representation, Classification and Recognition, Motion Analysis, Camera Calibration, Stereo Vision, Shape From X (shading, texture, motion, etc.), and typical applications such as Biometrics. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 441 - Geographic Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allow individuals and organizations to pose, explore and answer a variety of public- and private-sector questions using spatial data. In this course the student will learn to identify, manipulate and analyze spatial data using state-of-the-art software. The course is project-driven and hands-on: students will define and address real problems using real data. The course will also cover selected topics in information visualization as they relate to the use of GIS. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 441H - Honors Geographic Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. A course similar to CIS 441, with a project of greater depth and scope.

CIS 447 - Human-Computer Interfaces (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 390. This course covers the design and evaluation of the human-computer interface in interactive computer systems. Among the topics covered are approaches to interface design such as menus, commands, direct manipulation; screen layout strategies; metaphor models; models of human information process; evaluation approaches such as protocol for analysis, interactive monitoring, use of surveys; and requirements for documentation and help. Students are expected to design interface mockups and evaluate them. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 448 - Ubiquitous Computing ((3-0-3))
Handheld devices, mobile and wireless technologies, 'smart spaces', wearables and other technologies are creating a ubiquitous computing environment that is moving application development off the desktop. This course explores recent developments in both the technical and Human Computer Interaction(HCI) side of ubiquitous computing. To put into practice what is being learned, the class will use scenario based usability engineering techniques to design various aspects of a ubiquitous computing application to be deployed at NJIT. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 451 - Data Communications and Networks (3-1-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114. Fundamental concepts in data communications. Topics include: circuit and packet switching, layered network architecture, ISO Network protocols, performance analysis of data communication systems, flow control and alternate routing strategies and algorithms, various types of networks and their interconnections, network security and privacy. Additional topics include systems analysis and design, traffic engineering, planning and forecasting methodologies as applied to data communication networks. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 455 - Computer Systems Management (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS. An overview of computing centers and their organization for accomplishing specific objectives. Includes a classification of systems, analysis of cost and size, layout of equipment, methods of accessing computer facilities, equipment selection, and facilities evaluation. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 456 - Open Systems Networking (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 114. An introduction to internetworking, including an in-depth study of the architecture of network interconnections, the internet services, and the protocols needed to provide these services. Topics include: architecture of interconnected networks, internet addresses and the address resolution problem, internet protocols, the domain name system, the socket interface, the client-server model of interaction, the OSI transport and application support protocols, and the TCP/IP application protocols. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 458 - Technologies for Network Security ((3-0-3))
This course provides both an in depth theoretical study and a practical exposure to technologies which are critical in providing secure communication over the Internet. Topics include: remote access security, web security, wireless security, e-mail security, spam and spam filtering techniques, computer viruses and internet worms, honeypots and honeynets, security liability issues and compliance. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 461 - Systems Simulation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: completion of a 100-level GUR course in CIS; Math 333. This course introduces computer simulation as an algorithmic problem solving technique. Includes discrete simulation models, elementary theory, stochastic processes, use of simulation languages, random number generators, simulation of probabilistic processes, design of simulation experiments, validation of models, queueing systems, and applications to the design and analysis of operational systems. The GPSS language is covered in detail. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 465 - Computer Techniques for Management Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. Design and programming concepts are presented for automation of management information systems. Includes the organization of files and techniques for processing information based upon organizational requirements and available hardware and software. Some case studies are presented. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 465H - Honors Computer Techniques for Management Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. A course similar to CIS 465, with a project of greater depth and scope.

CIS 467H - Honors Efficient Algorithm Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 435 or CIS 335; Math 333. The course focuses on presenting techniques for efficient sequential and parallel algorithm design. Algorithms for numerical and combinatorial problems will be discussed. The use of randomization in the solution of algorithmic problems will be explored. Applications to be considered include string matching, polynomials and FFT algorithms, sorting networks, algebraic computations and primality testing and factoring, matrix operations, randomized algorithms for sorting and selection, and data compression. Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 475 - Evaluation of Computer Applications (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: a course in probability and statistics, or social science research methods. Methods for identifying usability problems and for testing the relative merits of alternative designs for interactive systems. Following a review of ** pending approval usability heuristics, students read journal articles about and practice five different methods: semi-structured interviews, protocol analysis, cognitive walkthroughs, user surveys, and controlled experiments. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 478 - Software Tools for Solving Problems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, permission of instructor. Provides students with an opportunity to interact directly with industry and solve actual problems using various -information-systems software tools. At the beginning of the semester, company representatives present actual problems they are facing, and the students work in groups to develop a solution, which they present at the end of the term. Presentation skills, working in groups, and using software tools for problem solving are stressed. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 480 - Theory of Languages (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 280 and CIS 341. The formal treatment of programming language translation and compiler design concepts. Emphasis on theoretical aspects of parsing context-free languages, translation specifications and machine-independent code optimization. A programming project to demonstrate the concepts covered in the course is required in addition to class work and examinations. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 482 - Data Mining (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. The course covers the concepts and principles of advanced data mining systems design; presents methods for association and dependency analysis, classification; prediction; and clustering analysis. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 482H - Honors Data Mining (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 431. A course similar to CIS 482, with a project of greater depth and scope.

CIS 484H - Honors Principles of Component Programming (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 288. A comprehensive study of the fundamental concepts and techniques of software development in a component-based environment. Topics include object-oriented Windows programming, components as objects in separate linkage units (DLL's), components in visual programming environments, introduction to CORBA, SOM, COM, and VCL technologies, components as windows or graphics objects, non-visual components, and error reporting from components.

CIS 485 - Special Topics in Computer Science I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: junior standing and/or department approval. The study of new and/or advanced topics in an area of computer science not regularly covered in any other CIS course. The precise topics to be covered in the course, along with prerequisites, will be announced in the semester prior to the offering of the course. A student may register for no more than two semesters of Special Topics. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 486 - Special Topics in Computer Science II (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Same as for CIS 485. A continuation of CIS 485. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 488 - Independent Study in Computer Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: open only to students in the Honors Program who are computer science majors and who have the prior approval of the department and the CIS faculty member who will guide the independent study. Independent studies, investigations, research, and reports on advanced topics in computer science. Students must prepare, in collaboration with their faculty mentor and in the semester prior to enrolling in this course, a detailed plan of topics and expected accomplishments for their independent study. This must have the approval of both the department and the faculty mentor. A student may register for no more than one semester of Independent Study. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 488H - Honors Independent Study in Computer Science/Information Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: honors college computer science or information systems majors who have the prior approval of the department and the CIS faculty member who will guide the independent study. Independent studies, investi-gations, research, and reports on advanced topics in computer science. Students must prepare, in collaboration with their faculty mentor and in the semester prior to enrolling in this course, a detailed plan of topics and expected accomplishments for their independent study. This must have the approval of both the department and the faculty mentor. A student may register for no more than one semester of independent study Effective Until: Fall 2006

CIS 490 - Guided Design in Software Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing or departmental approval. This course focuses on the methodology for developing software systems. Methods and techniques for functional requirements analysis and specifications, design, coding, testing and proving, integration and maintenance are discussed. Students will prepare a proposal for a project which includes its functional specifications and preliminary design. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 491 - Computer Science Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 490, senior standing and project proposal approval. An opportunity for the student to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in previous computer science work into an individual research project. The project involves investigation of current literature as well as computer implementation of either a part of a large program or the whole of a small system. The topic should be consonant with the emphasis of direction chosen by the students in their computer science studies. To register for this course, a student must have a written project proposal approved by the department. The proposal must be submitted and approved in the prior semester, usually the third week of November or April. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 491H - Honors Computer Science Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 490, senior standing in the Honors College and project proposal approval. A course similar to CIS 491, with a project of greater depth and scope. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 492 - Information Systems Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 465, senior standing, and, in a prior semester, project proposal approved by the faculty advisor. Integration of knowledge and skills gained in previous information systems courses into an individual research project. The project entails investigation of current literature and the design, implementation and evaluation of an information system. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 492H - Honors Information Systems Project (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: CIS 465, senior standing in the honors college, and, in a prior semester, project proposal approval by the faculty advisor. Similar to CIS 492, with a project of greater depth and scope. * All students at NJIT are required to complete at least one 100-level 2-credit or 3-credit CIS course. The Department of Computer and Information Science offers a set of 100 level courses to satisfy this requirement, and the student should select one based upon his or her intended major. It is imperative that students speak with their advisors prior to enrolling to determine the appropriate CIS course.

CS 444 - Pattern Recognition and Applications (3-0-3 )
This course introduces basic concepts and methodologies of pattern recognition and applications, and focuses on material that is fundamental and has a broad scope of application. Topics include statistical estimation, classifier design, parameter estimation and unsupervised learning, nonparametric techniques, linear discriminant functions, feature extraction, and clustering, with applications such as human face recognition, fingerprint recognition, iris recognition, and voice recognition.

GRADUATE COURSES:

CIS 500 - Introduction to Systems Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisites: statistics and differential equations. Covers a wide variety of systems oriented approaches to solving complex problems. Illustrative examples are chosen from a wide variety of applications. Mathematical tools are only introduced to the extent necessary to understand the technique and its application to the problem. Topic areas include probabilistic and decision theory models, simulation, morphological analysis, cluster analysis, structural modeling, Delphi and dynamic system models. The role for the computer in applying these techniques to complex problems will be discussed. The student will be exposed to some of the fundamental controversies concerning the appropriateness or validity of systems approaches to human problem solving. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 505 - Programming, Data Structures, and Algorithms (3 credits)
Prerequisite: knowledge of at least one procedure-oriented language such as PASCAL or C. Computer science students cannot use this course for graduate degree credit. Intensive introduction to computer science principles: a procedure-oriented language such as C++; program design techniques; introductory data structures (linked lists, stacks, sets, trees, graphs); and algorithms (sorting, searching, etc.) and their analysis. Programming assignments are included. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 506 - Foundations of Computer Science (3 credits)
Prerequisite: knowledge of C/PASCAL. Corequisite: CIS 505. Cannot be used for graduate credit towards the M.S. in Computer Science. Introduction to the concepts of iteration, asymptotic performance analysis of algorithms, recursion, recurrence relations, graphs, automata and logic, and also surveys the main data models used in computer science including trees, lists, sets, and relations. Programming assignments are given. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 510 - Assembly Language Programming and Principles (3 credits)
Prerequisite: knowledge of at least one procedure-oriented language such as PASCAL, C, or C++. Computer Science students cannot use this course for graduate degree credit. An intensive course in assembly language programming including basic machine organization, the structure of instruction sets, program linkage, macros and macro libraries. Extensive programming assignments are included. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 515 - Advanced Computer Programming for Engineers (3 credits)
Prerequisite: knowledge of at least one procedure-oriented language such as PASCAL, C, or FORTRAN. Students specializing in computer science may not take this course for credit. This course is designed for engineering students who require an extensive knowledge of programming for their project or thesis work. Topics include review of basic programming techniques, treatment of algorithm design, error analysis and debugging. As time permits, problem-oriented languages are examined. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 540 - Fundamentals of Logic and Automata (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 226 or equivalent (see undergraduate catalog for description). Theory of logic and automata and their influence on the design of computer systems, languages, and algorithms. Covers the application of Boolean algebra to design of finite state machines; formal systems, symbolic logic, computability, halting problem, Church's thesis, and the main ideas of the theory of computation. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 565 - Aspects of Information Systems (3 credits )
Co-requisite: CIS 431 or permission of the department. Methods and models of supporting the management process; ethical issues pertaining to the construction, deployment, and impact of information systems on organizations and society; description, analysis, and design of information systems to assist problem solving and decision-making in a business environment. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 590 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience I (3 additive credits)
Prerequisite: students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the CIS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the undergraduate computer science curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the CIS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for CIS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of each semester's work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in computer science. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 591 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience II (3 additive credits)
Prerequisite: students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the CIS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the undergraduate computer science curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the CIS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for CIS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of the semester work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in computer science. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 592 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience III (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: graduate standing, and acceptance by the CIS department and the Division of Career Development Services. Students must have the approval of the co-op advisor for the CIS department. Provides on-the-job reinforcement and application of concepts presented in the undergraduate or graduate computer science curriculum. Work assignments are identified by the co-op office and developed and approved by the CIS department in conjunction with the student and employer. Students must submit, for CIS department approval, a proposal detailing the nature of the intended work. A report at the conclusion of the semester work experience is required. Credits for this course may not be applied toward degree requirements for either the bachelor's or master's in computer science. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 601 - Object-Oriented Programming (3 credits)
Prerequisite: basic knowledge of C++. Covers the fundamentals of object-oriented programming. Includes object-oriented concepts such as data abstractions, encapsulation, inheritance, dynamic binding, and polymorphism, and uses C++ as the vehicle for illustrating and implementing these concepts. The object-oriented paradigm is systematically employed in the design of all concepts. Effects of this methodology on software maintenance, extensibility, and reuse. Significant programming/design projects. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 602 - Java Programming (3 credits)
Prerequisite: advanced Web-based programming with an emphasis on the Java language and platform. No prior knowledge of Java is required but students are expected to have a good understanding of object-oriented programming concepts such as encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism, experience with C++. Basic constructs and syntax and then the core advanced features. Topics include: networking and sockets, remote method invocation (RMI), database connectivity (JDBC), Java Beans, multi-threading and lighweight components (Swing). Common gateway interface (CGI) languages and browser scripting (JavaScript and VBScript) are discussed when used as a complement to the functionality of the Java language. Emphasis is on the Java Development Kit version 1.1 (JDK1.1), both deprecated methods and newly introduced features are discussed. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 603 - Advanced Programming Environments and Tools (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 601. Introduction to Graphical User Interface (GUI) Programming in the X Windows System environment. Design and implementation of the GUI at various levels of abstraction using industry standard software tools. Trade-offs between flexibility and ease of use inherent in GUI building tools. Best suited for the advanced programmer. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 604 - Client/Server Computing (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 333 and CIS 432 or instructor approval (see undergraduate catalog for descriptions). Fundamentals of client/server architecture as applied to the development of software systems. Concepts of distributed systems such as open systems, middleware, software reengineering, and distributed computing environments. Components of distributed client/server technologies such as X Windows Systems, DCE, CORBA, NFS, and ODBC. Case studies are used to illustrate how client/server techniques can be used in a variety of applications. The importance of standards and their role in client/server architecture, such as Posix, DCE, and COS. Requires creation of distributed applications. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 605 - Discrete Event Dynamic Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 630 or EE 601 or MnE 603 or equivalent. Covers discrete event dynamic system theory and its applications in modeling, control, analysis, validation, simulation, and performance evaluation of computer systems, flexible manufacturing systems, robotic systems, intelligent supervisory control systems, and communication networks. Emphasis on Petri net and automation based approaches. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 608 - Cryptography and Security (3-1-3)
This course involves computational methods providing secure Internet communication. Among the topics covered are: Security threats in communication systems; conventional cryptography: substitution and transposition codes; distribution of secret key over the Internet; principles of public-key cryptography; RSA and other public-key cryptographic methods; and digital signature protocol. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 610 - Data Structures and Algorithms (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 505 or CIS 335 or equivalents (see undergraduate catalog for description). Intensive study of the fundamentals of data structures and algorithms. Presents the definitions, representations, processing algorithms for data structures, general design and analysis techniques for algorithms. Covers a broad variety of data structures, algorithms and their applications including linked lists, various tree organizations, hash tables, strings, storage allocation, algorithms for searching and sorting, and a selected collection of other algorithms. Programs are assigned to give students experience in algorithms, data structure design and implementation. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 611 - Introduction to Computability and Complexity (3 credits)
Prerequisites: mathematics bridge requirements. Introduces the theoretical fundamentals of computing, and provides an understanding of both the inherent capabilities and limitations of computation. The main models of computation are deterministic and non-deterministic Turing machines. Auxiliary models include partial and total recursive functions, first order logic, recursive and recursively enumerable sets, and symbol systems. Covers the essentials of computational theory: first order logic, Russel's Paradox, completeness and consistency, Goedel's Theorem, Church's Thesis, countable and uncountable sets, simulation and computation, diagonalization, dove-tailing, decidable and undecidable problems, reduction, recursion theory, Rice's Theorem, Recursion Theorem, execution time measures, P and NP, polynomial-time reduction, NP-completeness and NP-hardness and formal correctness semantics of programs. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 621 - Numerical Analysis I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 511 (see undergraduate catalog for description) or an introductory course in numerical methods. An introduction to computational aspects of scientific and engineering problems. Time-dependent phenomena and corresponding quantitative models. Numerical stability and conditioning. Approximation of functions. Interpolation, integration. Solution of nonlinear equations. Ordinary differential equations of the first order. Finite and iterative algorithms for solution of systems of linear equations. Emphasis on computer implementation of algorithms and application to variety of engineering problems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 622 - Numerical Analysis II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 511 (see undergraduate catalog for description) or an introductory course in numerical methods. This course covers the theory and design of computer solutions to mathematical equations. Included are iterative methods for solving systems of linear and nonlinear equations, the numerical eigenvalue-eigenvector problem, and methods for solving ordinary and partial differential equations. Emphasis is on the control of errors generated by the computer. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 623 - Qualitative Research on Information Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 350 (or equivalent covering basics of research in IS) or CIS 675. A review of major qualitative research methods in Information Systems research, including interviews, content analysis, participant observation (ethnography), case and field studies, group techniques, and selected other methods. Students read and make experiential use of articles providing examples of the use of these methods in the IS journal literature. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 630 - Operating System Design (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 332, CIS 432 (see undergraduate catalog for descriptions) and CIS 505. An intensive study of computer operating system design including multiprogramming, time-sharing, real-time processing, job and task control, synchronization of concurrent processes and processors, resource scheduling, protection, and management of hierarchical storage. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 631 - Data Management System Design (3 credits)
Prerequisites: knowledge of C and data structures. Acquaintance with fundamental notions of relational database technology. Mathematical properties and usage of database programming languages. Methods of database design and conceptual modeling. Methods of physical storage for database information. Fundamental notions of concurrency control and recovery in database systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 632 - Advanced Database System Design (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 631 and knowledge of C++. Covers the concepts and principles of object-oriented data modeling and database systems, parallel and distributed database systems, database machines, real time (database) systems, multimedia and text databases, and imprecise information retrieval systems. Emphasis is on advanced data modeling, query optimization, indexing techniques, concurrency control, crash recovery, distributed deadlock detection, real-time scheduling, vague retrieval and system performance. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 633 - Distributed Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of bridge requirements. Fundamental topics concerning the design and implementation of distributed computing systems are covered, including interprocess communication, remote procedure calls, authentication, protection, distributed file systems, distributed transactions, replicated data, reliable broadcast protocols, and specifications for distributed programs. All topics will be illustrated with case studies. Optional topics may include synchronization, deadlocks, virtual time, and load balancing. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 634 - Information Retrieval (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 631. Covers the concepts and principles of information retrieval systems design. Techniques essential for building text databases, document processing systems, office automation systems, and other advanced information management systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 635 - Computer Programming Languages (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 505 and CIS 510. The theory and design of computer language systems; the formal theory of syntax and language classification; a survey of procedure and problem-oriented computer programming languages, their syntax rules, data structures, and operations; control structures and the appropriate environments and methods of their use; a survey of translator types. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 636 - Compiling System Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 635. Compiler organization; interaction of language and compiler design. The front end scanning, parsing, and syntax-directed translation: theory, standard approaches, and techniques; front-end tools such as Lex and Yacc. Attribute grammars. Code generation, register allocation, and scheduling; interaction with the run-time environment. Introduction to static analysis and optimization. As time permits, topics in modern compilers: compiling for object-oriented languages such as C++ or Java, memory hierarchies, pipelining, parallelism. Includes a significant programming component. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 637 - Real-Time Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of bridge requirements. Theory and principles that govern real-time systems design, and mechanisms and methodologies that enable their construction and operation. All aspects of such systems will be covered, including scheduling, device and resource management, communications, machine architecture, kernel software, language design and implementation, specification and user interfaces, and performance analysis and verification techniques. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 640 - Recursive Function Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 540 or equivalent. Review of basic computability theory. Topics include Church's thesis; unsolvability results; creative, productive, and simple sets; computational complexity; P=NP problem; and classification of solvable problems according to their complexity. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 641 - Formal Languages and Automata (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 226 or equivalent (see undergraduate catalog for description). Fundamentals of automata and formal languages: hierarchy of abstract machines and languages; nondeterministic finite state machines; tape and pushdown automata; context-free and context-sensitive grammars. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 650 - Computer Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 251 (see undergraduate catalog for description) and CIS 510. Exploiting instruction level parallelism (ILP) is central to designing modern computers. Presents design techniques used for such computers as IBM Power architectures, DEC Alpha, MIPS R4600, Intel P6, etc. Introduction of Instruction Set Architecture (ISA), various functional units, basic principles of pipelined computers. Modern techniques to ILP including superscalar, super-pipelining, software pipelining, loop unrolling, and VLIW. Memory hierarchy, including instruction cache, data cache, second level cache, and memory interleaving. Advanced computer architectures, including vector, array processors, interconnection technology, and ATM network of workstations. Hands-on experience designing a simple pipelined computer on screen and using CAD tools such as Cadence or ViewLogic. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 651 - Data Communications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Math 333 (see undergraduate catalog for description). Intensive study of the analytic tools required for the analysis and design of data communication systems. Topics include: birth-death queuing systems, Erlang's distribution, bulk-arrival and bulk-service systems, design and analysis of concentrators and multiplexers, elements of Renewal Theory, M/G/1 system, analysis of Time Division Multiplexing, priority queues, analysis of random access systems, time reversibility, open and closed queuing networks, mean value analysis, flow and congestion, control mechanisms, routing algorithms, flow models, and network topological design. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 652 - Computer Networks-Architectures, Protocols and Standards (3 Credits)
Prerequisite: A high level programming language, Math 333 (see undergraduate catalog for description), or instructor approved equivalents. Intensive study of various network architecture and protocol standards; with emphasis on the Open Systems Interconnetion (OSI) model. Topics include: analog and digital transmission, circuit and packet switching, the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), Frame Relay, Broadband ISDN, Cell Relay, SONET, Local Area Networks (CSMA/CD, Token Bus, Token Ring, switched and isochronous Ethernets), Metropolitan Area Networks (FDDI, FDDI-II, DQDB), wireless and satellite networks, synchronization and error control, routing and congestion control, X.25 standard. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 653 - Microcomputers and Applications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: familiarity with an assembly level and higher-level language. An investigation of the personal computer based on the WinTEl architecture. Programming and use of the various input/output devices via operating system constructs. Use of computer in stand-alone (control) applications and networked applications. Investigation of non-Intel architectures and non-Windows systems as time permits. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 654 - Telecommunication Networks Performance Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 651, CIS 652, or instructor approved equivalents. Modeling and analysis of telecommunication networks; with emphasis on Local Area Networks (LANs) and Metropolitan Area Networks (MANs). Case studies will be presented and discussed, and the need for modeling and analysis will be established. Various types of LANs, and MANs will be modeled and analyzed. Problem sets and case studies will be assigned to facilitate understanding of the covered material. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 656 - Internet and Higher Layer Protocols (3 credits)
The course provides a foundation of knowledge of the Internet and its protocols. Topics include: Addressing, Routing and Forwarding, Classless Interdomain Routing, the IP and ICMP protocols, the UDP and TCP protocols, the layering models in OSI and in TCP/IP, IGMP, Routing methods (RIP, OSPF, BGP), The Domain Name System, The World Wide Web and http. In addition, students will be made familiar with use of a packet sniffer (such as tcpdump or ethereal) and with tools such as ping, nslookup and traceroute. Students will develop the detailed knowledge of packet headers needed to understand output of packet sniffers. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 657 - Principles of Interactive Computer Graphics (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 505 or familiarity with the organization of at least one computer system, and knowledge of a structured programming language such as C. Graduate-level introduction to computer graphics concepts, algorithms, and systems. Includes 2-D raster graphics, algorithms, 2-D and 3-D geometric transformations, 3-D viewing, curves and surfaces. Emphasis on PC-based graphics programming projects. Principles of interactive graphics systems in terms of the hardware, software and mathematics required for interactive image production. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 658 - Multimedia Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 601 (Object-Oriented Programming) or equivalent. Multimedia software systems incorporate various media, such as text, images, video and audio, to provide rich experiences for users. This is a course in the design, implementation and evaluation of multimedia systems. The course has three major content areas and goals: (1) multimedia data types-the goal being to understand the development and use of various multimedia data types; (2) usability and user modeling-the goal being to incorporate theories of human perception and cognition into the design and evaluation of multimedia systems; and (3) multimedia design and software tools-the goals being to plan and develop multimedia projects and to be aware of ways in which multimedia is being used in the public and private sectors. Both terms must be completed to receive credit toward the history requirement. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 659 - Image Processing and Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 505. Fundamentals of image processing, analysis and understanding. Topics include image representation, image data compression, image enhancement and restoration, feature extraction and shape analysis, region analysis, image sequence analysis and computer vision. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 661 - Systems Simulation (3 credits)
Prerequisites: an undergraduate or graduate course in probability theory and statistics, and working knowledge of at least one higher-level language. An introduction to the simulation of systems, with emphasis on underlying probabilistic and statistical methodologies for discrete-event simulations. Design of simulation applications, and simulation programming in a high-level language. Algorithms for the generation of pseudorandom numbers. Algorithmic methodologies for the simulation of discrete and continuous probabilistic processes. Use of statistical tools. Simulation of queuing systems. Applications of simulation to a variety of system studies. The special purpose simulation language GPSS is studied in detail. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 662 - Model Analysis and Simulation (3 credits)
Prerequisite: introductory course in simulation. Advanced topics in simulation methodology, including design of simulation experiments, variance reduction techniques, estimation procedures, validation, and analysis of simulation results. Queueing systems. Implementing a simulation with the SIMSCRIPT language. Models of continuous systems with applications to elementary socio-economic and industrial systems. Utilization of the DYNAMO II language. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 663 - Advanced System Analysis and Design (3 credits )
This course focuses on the systems analysis and design techniques employed in the development of software applications. Topics include software process and process models ( e.g. Rational Unified Process), project management, structured and object oriented analysis, system design, quality systems, system and software architecture, design patterns, re-use and component-based design, change control and configuration managemnet. Analysis and design will be covered primarily from an object oriented perspective. Students will read selected material from the literature, actively participate in discussions, labs and exercises in addition to participating in projects that involve analysis and design for real-world problems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 665 - Algorithmic Graph Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610. The elements of the theory of graphs and directed graphs with motivating examples from communication networks, data structures, etc; shortest paths, depth first search, matching algorithms, parallel algorithms, minimum spanning trees, basic complexity theory, planarity, and other topics. Programming assignments are included. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 667 - Design Techniques for Algorithms (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610. An introduction to the principles of major design techniques in algorithms. Examples from a variety of topics and problems in computer science are used to demonstrate these design techniques and their appropriate application. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 668 - Parallel Algorithms (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 610 and CIS 650. This course examines a variety of parallel algorithms and architectures. Shared memory algorithms and algorithms for special architectures (tree processors, grids, systolic arrays, butterflies) are considered. The basic theory of algorithm/architecture performance will be described. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 669 - Computational Geometry (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610 or permission of the instructor. Intensive study of the fundamentals of computational geometry data structures and algorithms. Emphasis is on the design of efficient algorithms and data structures, proofs of their correctness and complexity analysis. Fundamental topics including geometric searching, convex hull computation, nearest/farthest searching, Voronoi diagrams, Euclidean minimum spanning trees, planar triangulation, planar point location, arrangement of lines. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 670 - Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610 and CIS 631. Fundamental concepts and general techniques in artificial intelligence. Main topics include goal tree search, logic and deduction, adduction, uncertainty, fuzzy logic, knowledge representations, machine learning, vision, and action planning. The LISP programming language is used extensively. Students are required to do programming assignments, complete a programming term project, and review case studies. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 671 - Knowledge-Based Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 670 or equivalent. Deals with the underlying architectures of ?classical? knowledge-based systems, i.e., systems based on a knowledge representation formalism that are built by knowledge acquisition from a domain expert; and advanced database systems, especially object-oriented and deductive databases. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 672 - Expert System Methods and Design (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 670. Deals with expert systems, expert system shells, programming of rule-based systems, selection of shells, verification and validation of expert systems, and knowledge acquisition techniques for extracting knowledge from domain experts. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 673 - Software Design and Production Methodology (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 631. Modern techniques and methods employed in the development of large software systems, including a study of each of the major activities occurring during the lifetime of a software system, from conception to obsolescence and replacement. Topics include cost/performance evaluation, documentation requirements, system design and production techniques, system verification techniques, automated aids to system development, and project organization and management. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 674 - Natural Language Processing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 670. Deals with techniques of natural language understanding. Topics are syntax and parsing (top down and bottom up), semantics, pragmatics and use of world knowledge in language understanding. Augmented Transition Networks will be used as programming tool set. Good knowledge of LISP or PROLOG. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 675 - Information System Evaluation (3 credits)
Prerequisites: a course in statistics and CIS 677. Theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches to evaluate information systems within the context of the user and organizational environment. Topics include qualitative techniques such as protocol analysis and interviews; quantitative techniques such as sample surveys and controlled experiment; cost-benefit analysis, and analyses of data gathered by these approaches by methods such as regression, correlation, and analysis of variance. Emphasis on the application of these approaches to improve functionality, interface, and acceptance of information systems in organizations. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 676 - Requirements Engineering (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of bridge requirements, CIS 673 or equivalent project experience in the field. Theory, principles, and practical application of the methodologies and tools of requirements engineering. The focus is development of large software systems and the integration of multiple systems into a comprehensive, domain dependent solution. All aspects of requirements engineering will be covered, including problem analysis, requirements specification techniques and tools, and specification of functional and non-functional requirements. Related technologies like domain analysis and pre-planned systems integration are also discussed. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 677 - Information System Principles (3 credits)
Prerequisites: familiarity with the organization of a computer system and knowledge of at least one higher-level language. Reviews the role of information systems in organizations and how they relate to organizational objectives and organizational structure. Identifies basic concepts such as the systems point of view, the organization of a system, the nature of information and information flows, the impact of systems upon management and organizations, human information processing and related cognitive concepts. Introduces various types of applications that are part of information systems. The course focus is on management information systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 678* - Medical Terminologies (3 credits)
Describes in depth a number of medical terminologies in common use in the U.S. health care system, such as ICD-9-CM, SNOMED, HL7, MeSH, and especially the UMLS of the National Library of Medicine. Conduct hands-on work with the UMLS and write programs to extract and display information from the UMLS. Also covers European systems such as GALEN/SMK.

CIS 679 - Management of Computer and Information Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 675. Management of the development, planning, and utilization of information systems within organizations. Focuses on the current literature in the management of information systems. Topics include the approval and decision process for the development of systems, use of steering committees and various approaches to user involvement. Utilizes a number of Harvard University case studies. Project utilizing professional literature required. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 681 - Computer Security Auditing (3 credits )
Prerequisites: CIS 601 or CIS 631 or permission of the instructor. Security control risks and issues. Information protection concepts, elements of security systems, computer crime and legal issues, controls and auditing systems, firewall configuration. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 682 - Geometric Modeling (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610. The techniques required to describe the shape of an object and to simulate dynamic processes; parametric geometry of curves, surfaces, and solids; and particular formulations for facilitating calculating geometric properties. Fundamentals of solid model construction and analysis are discussed extensively. Some applications in computer graphics, CAD, and CAM are also mentioned. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 683 - Object-Oriented Software Development (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 635, experience in software design and development or explicit approval of the instructor. Advanced course in software development. Presents the object-oriented methodology for software development and examines various areas to which this methodology can be applied. Analysis, design, and implementation of object-oriented software and the effect of this methodology on code reusability, extensibility, and robustness. Examines object-oriented languages, object-oriented databases, and object-oriented user-interfaces. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 684 - Business Process Innovation (3 credits )
Prerequisites: CIS 631, CIS 673, knowledge of information systemsdevelopment. Discusses a balanced approach to business process innovation (BPI) that includes both incremental improvement and re-engineering. Introduces strategy and process alignment, various types of busines processes, and process mapping software. Details a BPI implementation methodology, interwoven with many case studies. Students will work on real process re-design projects using a process mapping software product. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 686 - Pervasive Computing: An HCI Perspective (3 credits)
This course examines Pervasive/Ubiquitous Computing, the trend toward increasingly ubiquitous connected computing devices in the environment. A trend being brought about by a convergence of advanced electronic, and particularly, wireless technologies and the internet. It does this from a Human Computer Interaction perspective looking at the current and future design of various systems. Effective From: Fall 2005 Until: Summer 2006

CIS 688 - Programming for Interactive Environments (3 credits)
Prerequisite: knowledge of C++. A thorough study of the fundamental concepts and techniques of programming for modern interactive support environments, better known as graphical user interfaces (GUIs). A balanced blend of principle and practice, incorporating a general paradigm of interactive program development and numerous examples from, and projects in, the major GUI environments. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 696 - Network Management and Security (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 652 or ECE 683, and CIS 656. Thorough introduction to current network management technology and techniques, and emerging network management standards. In-depth study of the existing network security technology and the various practical techniques that have been implemented for protecting data from disclosure, for guaranteeing authenticity of messages, and for protecting systems from network-based attacks. SNMP family of standards including SNMP, SNMPv2, and RMON (Remote Monitoring), OSI systems management. Various types of security attacks (such as intruders, viruses, and worms). Conventional Encryption and Public Key Cryptology. Various security services and standards (such as Kerberos, Digital Signature Standard, Pretty Good Privacy, SNMPv2 security facility). Same as ECE 638. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 697 - Principles of Broadband ISDN and ATM (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 652 or ECE 683 or equivalent. Study of the Broadband Integrated Services Digital Network (B-ISDN) architecture and services. In-depth study of the Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), ATM Adaptation Layer (AAL), ATM switching architectures, SONET/SDH, ATM traffic control, broadband integrated traffic models, Operation Administration and Management (OAM) functions, TCP/IP over ATM, and ATM market. Same as ECE 639. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for the master's degree. An approved project involving design, implementation, and analysis, or theoretical investigation is required of all students in the Master of Science degree program who do not take CIS 701 Master's Thesis. A project proposal must be submitted in a prior semester by an announced date and receive faculty approval. Project work is normally initiated in a computer science course with the knowledge and approval of the instructor who will become the student's project advisor.

CIS 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisite: matriculation for the master's degree. An approved project involving design, implementation, and analysis or theoretical investigation may be the basis for the thesis. The work will be carried out under the supervision of a designated member of the faculty. The thesis should be of such caliber as to warrant publication in a technical or scientific journal. Approval to register for the thesis must be obtained from the thesis advisor. A student must register for a minimum of 3 credits per semester. Credit will be limited, however, to the 6 credits indicated for the thesis.

CIS 725, 726 - Independent Study in Computer Science I, II (3 credits)
Prerequisites: graduate standing and department consent. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 730 - Seminar in Database Management Topics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 631. A seminar in which students pursue intensive study of specialized topics in the current literature of database management. Each topic is supported by an initial reading list covering current problems in theory and practice. Students present the results of their studies in class with faculty and invited specialists participating. Topics include, but are not limited to, advanced data modeling, object oriented databases, query languages, semantic optimization, database mapping and integration, physical database architecture, database/knowledge-base integration, distributed databases, database machines, database version control, logical and deductive databases. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 731 - Applications of Database Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 675 and CIS 631. Restricted to students who are specializing in computer and information systems management. Comparative study of different models of database management systems and their applications. Emphasis on the functions of the database administrator. Includes a survey of physical and logical organization of data, methods of accessing data, characteristics of different models of generalized database management systems, and case studies using these systems from various applications. Student teams design database systems for class projects. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 732 - Design of Interactive Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 675. Design of interactive systems and human computer interfaces. Covers the current professional literature in this field and the ?knowns? about design. Emphasizes application areas that have a great deal of cognitive variability and diverse user populations. Design interfaces for various applications. The impact of costs and operational practices upon user behavior and current research topics in interface design are covered. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 734 - Data Mining (3 credits )
Prerequisites: Permission from instructor. Covers the concepts and principles of advanced data mining systems design. Presents methods for association and dependency analysis, classification and predication, and clustering analysis. Optional topics may include Web and scientific data mining, knowledge discovery applications, and current trends in data mining. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 735 - Computer Mediated Communication Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 675. Seminar for students contemplating research in the following areas: designs and the impact of, computer-based systems for human communication, including electronic mail, computer conferencing, Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), Group Decision Support Systems (GDSS), the Internet and the World Wide Web. Topics include alternative design structures, impacts of primarily text-based asynchronous group communication, and recent empirical studies. Completion of a publishable state-of-the-art written review or design of a tailored CMC system is required. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 741 - Communication Network Design (3 credits)
Prerequisites: CIS 651 and CIS 652. Basic problems of communication network design: analyzes their complexity and provides algorithms, heuristics and other techniques for their solution. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 744 - Data Mining and Management in Bioinformatics (3 credits )
Prerequisites: CIS 610 or permission of the instructor Concepts and principles of bioinformatic data mining and management with focus on efficiency and scalability. Methods for indexing and querying biological databases, biological data mining, and algorithmic development for bimolecular and phlyogenetic data analysis. Trends and advances in areas such as functional genomics and proteomics, genetic engineering, and large-scale gene expression data analysis. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 750 - High Performance Computing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 650. An in-depth study of the state of the art in high performance computing. Topics parallel computer architectures, programming paradigms, and their applications. Parallel architectures include PC clusters, shared-memory multiprocessors, distributed-memory multiprocessors, and multithreaded architectures. Parallel programming paradigms include message passing interface (MPI), its second-generation MPI-2, and multithreaded programming. Applications include computational science and high performance Web and database servers for Internet-based electronic commerce. Students program a parallel machine in class projects. First-hand experience in stable, scalable, high performance computing for Internet-based electronic commerce. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 752 - Communication Protocol Synthesis and Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 652 or basic familiarity with communication protocols. An in-depth study of the state of the art of protocol engineering. Enables students to apply the techniques of protocol design to real problems in communication protocols. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 754 - Measurement and Evaluation of Software Quality and Performance (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Ph.D. core courses, CIS 630, CIS 661. A study of the tools for the measurement of software products and the use of these tools in the evaluation of software quality and performance. Structural and functional models of algorithms, programs, and systems are presented to define the quantitative and subjective characteristics of computer products. Course includes the use of hardware and software tools, the study of simulation and analytic techniques, description of workloads and benchmarks for system evaluation, problems of scale, proof of program correctness, feature value analysis, and the design and interpretation of experiments. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 759 - Advanced Image Processing and Analysis (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 659. Advanced study of recent research in image processing, analysis, and understanding. Topics include all image processing techniques, high-level recognition approaches, and automated expert vision systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 762 - Computerized Information Systems for Planning and Forecasting (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 675. Capturing and processing of subjective and empirical data for use in planning and forecasting information systems and the incorporation of these facilities into information systems designs. Emphasis on conveying understanding of the limitations of various methods and techniques to meet various planning and forecasting objectives. Use of various techniques such as the Delphi method, structural modeling, cluster analysis and regression approaches. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 767 - Decision Support Systems (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 675. The design, implementation, and utilization of models and their software support systems for application in managerial decision making at the strategic, tactical, and operational levels. Topics include the perspective of decision-support systems, the management of large simulation models and documentation standards, combined hybrid simulation languages and their applications, financial modeling and financial modeling languages. Systems dynamics and its managerial applications at the strategic level; specialized modeling and analysis software packages for managerial decision making; and recent research in computer-aided tools for capturing group judgment, modeling, and decision-making are also discussed. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 775 - Seminar in Software Engineering (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 673. A seminar in which students pursue intensive study of specialized topics in the current literature of software engineering. Each topic is supported by an initial reading list on current problems in theory and practice. The results of the studies are discussed in class with students, faculty and invited specialists. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 776 - Independent Study in Information Systems (3 credits )
Prerequisite: restricted to students in the doctoral program in Information Systems ( or students in the joint Rutgers- NJIT PhD in management who major in CIS). Students must have an approved program of study and approval of a faculty advisor to register for this course. Normally used for work on the "state of the art literature review," preceding the thesis, which is then presented to a committee for approval. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 777 - Seminar in Software Management and Production (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Ph.D. core courses. A seminar in which students pursue intensive study of specialized topics in the current literature of software management and production. Each topic is supported by an initial reading list covering current problems in theory and practice. The results of the studies are discussed in class with students, faculty, and invited specialists participating. Topics include, but are not limited to, theory of algorithm structure, analysis of algorithms and programs, hardware technology assessment, automated tools for software production, software measurements and quality, peripheral device interfaces, data communications, computer networks, distributed processing, software verification, implementation standards, documentation standards, system security, software copyright, and project control and organization. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 780 - Computer Vision (3 credits )
Prerequisite: CIS 505. This course introduces computational models of computer vision and their implementation on computers, and focuses on material that is fundamental and has a broad scope of application. Topics include contemporary development in all mainstream areas of computer vision e.g., Image Formation, Feature Representation, Classification and Recognition , Motion Analysis, Camera Calibration, 3D Vision, Shape From X, and typical applications such as Biometrics. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 782 - Pattern Recognition and Applications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: CIS 610. Study of recent advances in development of (statistical and syntactic) pattern algorithm, approximation, and estimation techniques. Topics include statistical estimation theory, classifier design, parameter estimation and unsupervised learning, bias vs. variance, nonparametric techniques, linear discriminant functions, tree classifiers, feature extraction, and clustering. Additional topics include Support Vector machines (SVM), Bayesian Learning, Hidden Markov Models (HMM), evolutionary computation, neural networks, with applications to signal interpretation, time-series prediction, and Biometrics. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 785 - Seminar in Computer and Information Science I (3 credits)
Prerequisites: determined by nature of topic area. Advance notice of the topics to be covered is given. These seminars examine in depth a special interest area of computer and information science. It emphasizes recent work in area selected for the offering of the course. This course is for master's students and cannot apply toward master's degree credit. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 786 - Special Topics in Computer and Information Science (3 credits)
Prerequisites: same as for CIS 785. A continuation of CIS 785. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 787 - Information Systems PhD Seminar A (1 credit)
The seminar includes student presentations related to their research, faculty presentations, and occasional outside speakers. Its goal is to enable students to identify their research areas for the dissertation, and to obtain constructive feedback on their papers and research in progress. Two presentations are required of each student. Open to students in the PhD program in Information Systems. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 788 - Information Systems PhD Seminar B (3 credits )
Prerequisite: restricted to students in the doctoral program in Information Systems ( or students in the joint Rutgers- NJIT PhD in management who major in CIS). The seminar includes student presentations related to their research, faculty presentations, and occasional outside speakers. Its goal is to enable students to identify their research area for the dissertation, and to obtain constructive feedback on their papers and research in progress. Students are required to engage in a research internship under the direction of a faculty member, and to make at least three presentations, including at least one for a paper to be submitted to a professional meeting or journal. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 790 - Doctoral Dissertation (Credits as designated)
Corequisite: CIS 791. Required for all doctoral students in computer science and for doctoral students in the joint NJIT/Rutgers doctoral program in management who major in computer information systems. A minimum of 36 credits is required. The student must register for at least 6 credits of dissertation while engaged in doctoral research. After 30 credits (additive to a maximum of 6 credits of CIS 792) are completed, students must register for 3 credits each semester until the dissertation is completed.

CIS 791 - Graduate Seminar (Non-credit)
Corequisite (for doctoral students only): CIS 790. A seminar in which faculty, students, and invited speakers will present summaries of advanced topics in computer and information systems management. In the course students and faculty will discuss research procedures, dissertation organization, and content. Students engaged in research will present their own problems and research progress for discussion and criticism. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 792 - Pre-Doctoral Research (3 credits)
Prerequisite: permission from department chairperson. For students admitted to the doctoral program in computer and information science who have passed the field exam or the qualifying examination. Research is carried out under the supervision of a designated faculty member. Students identify a research problem and prepare a plan to solve the problem. A maximum of 6 credits of CIS 792 may be applied to the CIS 790 requirement. Effective Until: Summer 2006

CIS 794 - Computer Science Colloquium (Non-credit)
Prerequisite: graduate standing with major in computer science. Colloquium in which national and international experts in the various fields of computer science are invited to present and discuss the results of their recent research. Effective Until: Summer 2006





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