CATALOG HOME | UNDERGRADUATE | GRADUATE | DISTANCE LEARNING | ADMISSIONS | REGISTRAR | NJIT | CATALOG ARCHIVE
bme
Biomedical Engineering:   Offered by the Department of Biomedical Engineering
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

BME 101 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (1-0-0)
This course is open only to freshmen and new transfer students. Faculty members describe their research in biomedical engineering.

BME 105 - Introduction to Human Physiology I (2-0-2)
This course is open only to freshmen and transfer students. An overview of human physiology is presented as an introduction to subsequent core courses in the Biomedical Engineering curriculum. Not intended to be an exhaustive review of physiology, the course will instead emphasize key examples that highlight understanding of the interaction between the biomedical and engineering worlds. This course is the first of two freshman courses; this one will focus on cellular and neural-system basic physiology. Effective From: Fall 2006 Until: Spring 2014

BME 106 - Introduction to Human Physiology II (1-0-1)
Prerequisite: BME 105. This course is open only to freshmen and transfer students. An overview of human physiology is presented as an introduction to subsequent core courses in the Biomedical Engineering curriculum. Not intended to be an exhaustive review of physiology, the course will instead emphasize key examples that highlight understanding of the interaction between the biomedical and engineering worlds. This course is the first of two freshman courses; this one will focus on basic physiology of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Effective From: Spring 2007 Until: Spring 2014

BME 111 - Introduction to Physiology (3-0-3)
This course is open only to freshmen and transfer students. An overview of human physiology is presented as an introduction to subsequent core courses in the Biomedical Engineering curriculum. Not intended to be an exhaustive review of physiology, the course will instead emphasize key examples that highlight understanding of the interaction between the biomedical and engineering worlds. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 301 - Electrical Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in Phys 121 & Math 112, and BME 105 or BME 111. Course lectures and laboratories will address important issues for biomedical engineers at the introductory level; covering the origins of bio-electric signals and the instrumentation involved in collection of biopotentials from the electrodes to processing of the signals on the computer. Some other topics included are the transducers/sensors and modern engineering software used in bio-instrumentation. Laboratory work will provide hands-on experience in all of these areas. The course will also address practical issues in design of medical devices such as noise, resolution, linearity, and saturation. This course is offered in Studio format that involves the integration of lectures and labs into one highly participatory structure. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 302 - Mechanical Fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in Phys 121 & Math 112, and BME 105 or BME 111. BME 301 is not a prerequisite. The format is identical to that of BME 301. Course lectures and laboratories will address important issues covering the mechanical fundamentals that are important bases for later learning experiences. This course introduces the students to to engineering mechanics and how those principles are relevant to biomechanical issues. This course is offered in Studio format that involves the integration of lectures and labs into one highly participatory structure. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 303 - Biological and Chemical Foundations of Biomedical Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Grade of C or higher in (Chem 126 or Chem 122) and Phys 121 and (BME 105 or BME 111). This course covers organic chemistry, biochemistry and cellular mechanics in sufficient depth to give biomedical engineering students a strong enough background for them to understand the introductory aspects of the discipline, which focus on the application of engineering principles to medicine and surgery. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 304 - Material fundamentals of Biomedical Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: A Grade of C or higher in (Chem 126 or Chem 122), Phys 121 and (BME105 or BME 111). This course is an introduction to the field of biomaterials with an emphasis on the wound healing process and interactions between the human body and implanted devices fabricated from various types of biomaterials. The thrust of this course will be to illuminate the processes occurring at the tissue-biomaterial interface. Attention will be given to the biological events occurring at the molecular level on the surface of an implanted device. The nature of these surfaces and the physiological consequences of these processes will be examined in terms of how the body and functioning of the device are impacted. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 310 - Biomedical Computing (3-1-3)
Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in BME 301 and CS 101. This course covers the application of digtal signal processing to biomedical problems. Application of programming language common in engineering, for signal acquisition and processing. Applications include analysis of the electrocardiogram and other electrical signals generated by the body. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 311 - Co-op Work Experience (3 degree credits)
Prerequisites: sophomore standing or above, approval of department, and permission of Career Development Services. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated by the co-op office and approved by the department. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report.Note: Normal grading applies to this COOP Experience Effective From: Spring 2013

BME 333 - Biomedical Signals and Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 310 and Math 222. BME Tools such as the Laplace and Fourier Transforms, time-frequency analysis are introduced. Applications include signals and noise, processing of the ECG, mathematics of imaging and derivation of useful physiological parameters from input signals. Effective From: Fall 2006

BME 351 - Introduction to Biofluid Mechanics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302, Mech 236 and Mech 320. Introduction to the principles of fluid flow. Basic fluid principles, such as fluid properties, fluid statics, conservation of mass, momentum, and energy will be discussed and presented in BME context. Special attention will be given to the non-Newtonian nature of blood, viscous flow in arteries, unsteady flows, and to the fluidic output of the heart. The textbook material will be supplemented throughout the course to emphasize examples relative to BME Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 372 - Biomedical Electronics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BME 301. The first of a two-semester sequence that covers the design of electronic circuits for Biomedical applications. This course covers basic operational amplifier circuits as well as the operation of semiconductor diodes and transistors. An introduction to digital logic circuits is also provided. Computer simulation as well as hands-on breadboarding of electronic circuits are used throughout the course to supplement the lectures.

BME 373 - Biomedical Electronics II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BME 372. This is a continuation of BME 372 emphasizing biomedical applications of oscillators, active filters, and wave-shaping circuits.

BME 381 - Engineering Models in Physiology I (3-2-3)
Prerequisites: Math 222, BME 106 and Phys 121. Some knowledge of programming required. Mathematical models of organs and organ systems are described from an engineering viewpoint. Anatomy and physiology are quantified. Heart and circulation, gas exchange in the lungs, electrical properties of excitable membranes, renal countercurrent mechanism and muscle mechanics are among the topics covered. Emphasis will be placed on feedback control, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. Effective From: Spring 2006 Until: Spring 2013

BME 382 - Engineering Models of Physiological Systems (3-2-3)
Prerequisites: Math 222, 121, BME 301 and BME 302. Students learn to develop quantitative models of organs and organ systems from an engineering viewpoint. Students translate their understanding of physiological systems into models that evolve dynamically based on engineering block diagrams. Additional topics include: hierarchical structure, sensitivity analysis, parameter estimation, negative feedback control, and characteristic traits of models. Students will use models to gain insight into how a physiological system functions and to design a biomedical engineering device or procedure that interacts with the physiological system. Systems studied include the cardiovascular system, gas exchange in the lungs, nerve and muscle action potentials, and musculo-skeletal spinal reflex. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 383 - Measurement Lab for Physiological Systems & Tissue (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302, BME 310, and (Math 279 or Math 333). Through laboratory experiences, students will apply engineering methods for measuring and interpretating the properties of physiological systems and biological tissues. Topics include measurements relevant to cardio-pulmonary, nerve and muscular systems. Effective From: Spring 2008

BME 384 - Biomechanics Laboratory (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302, Mech 236, Mech 320 and CS 101 and (Math 279 or Math 333). This course is an introduction to the experimental analysis of the biomechanics of human motion. Laboratory experiments include the application and integration of anatomical and mechanical concepts to a wide variety of activities. Students will develop basic competence in a systematic approach to the observation, analysis and evaluation of human movement in clinical, educational, and industrial environments. Effective From: Spring 2009

BME 385 - Cell and Biomaterial Engineering Laborarory (1-3-3)
Prerequisite: BME 304 and (BME 303 or R120:102 -Biology II) and (Math 279 or Math 333). This laboratory course is designed to provide students with valuable hands-on experience in the field of cellular and biomaterial engineering. Experiments include biomaterial fabrication and characterization, mechanical testing of biomaterials, colorimetric protein assay, cell-based assay, the basics of cell culture techniques, the basics of light and electron microscopy, and image capture and analysis. A lecture on the principles of a given technique will be followed by laboratory activity. Effective From: Spring 2009

BME 386 - Bioinstrumentation Laboratory (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: ECE 251, BME 372 and (Math 279 or Math 333). Laboratory exercises involve projects at all levels of a bioinstrumentation system from sensors to data acquisition and data processing. Analog and digital circuits are constructed to condition the signals from sensors and convert them into a format that can be displayed or acquired into a computer. The final projects help to develope the skills to integrate various parts of a bioinstrumentation system, collect and analyze data and troubleshoot a circuit. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 411 - Co-op Work Experience (0 credits)
Prerequisites: BME 311 and completion of sophomore year, approval of department, and permission of Career Development Services. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. Work assignments facilitated by the co-op office and approved by the department. Mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report. May count as BME or approved elective. Grade will now be issued as a letter grade. Effective From: Fall 2011

BME 420 - Advanced Biomaterials Science (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302, BME 304, Math 222 and MTSE 301. The goal of this course is to understand material selection, important properties of materials for use in the body and failure modes of applied biomaterials. The course will cover the structure and properties of materials used as biomaterials including metals, ceramics, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. The structure of these materials will be explored to understand how it defines the behavior of a material. The bulk behavior of materials will be reviewed, including the generalized Hooke's Law, and new concepts will be introduced (including thermal strain, surface properties, and viscoelasticity). Students will be presented with problems of property characterization, failure analysis and performance testing. Students will work in teams to analyze a marketed implant or device using biomaterial(s) using the tool and concepts learned in the course. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 422 - Biomaterials Characterization (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 304 and MTSE 301. The quantum mechanical origins of spectroscopy, the relationship of spectroscopic behavior to thermal characteristics of a material, and the differences in approach to the chemical and physical characterization of synthetic and biological polymers are discussed. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 427 - Biotransport (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: MATH 222, (BME 303 or R120:102), and CHE 230. This course provided an introduction to basic concepts in thermodynamics and transport phenomena as applied to biological systems. The structure and composition of the body will be covered followed by an exploration of the properties of the blood and its flow in the cardiovascular system, and the body as a heat source and as a series of compartments involved in the mass transfer of materials (such as those in the kidneys and lungs). Design of artificial kidneys and heart-lung machines is also explored. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 430 - Fundamentals of Tissue Engineering (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BME 302, (BME 303 or R120:102), BME 304, MATH 222 and MTSE 301. This course is an introduction to the field of tissue engineering as a therapeutic approach to treating damaged or diseased tissues in the biotechnology industry. In essence, new and functional living tissue can be fabricated by delivering cells, scaffolds, DNA, proteins, and/or protein fragments at surgery. This course will cover the advances in the fields of cell biology, molecular biology, material science and their relationship towards developing novel "tissue engineered" therapies. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 451 - Biomechanics I (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302, MECH 236 and MECH 320. Tensor analysis. Kinematics of continuous media. Stress. The elastic solid. Newtonian fluid. Conservation principles of mass, momentum and energy. Viscometric flows. Formulation of constitutive equations. Applications to the modeling of bone and other living tissues. Effective From: Spring 2013

BME 452 - Mechanical Behavior & Performance of Biomaterials (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BME 302, BME 304, MATH 222, MATH 337, MATH 279, and MECH 320. Biomaterial selection and performance is essential to the design and implementation of most any biomedical application. Students will learn about important properties of materials for use in the body and failure modes of applied biomaterials. Material behavior will be reviewed, including the generalized Hooke's Law, and new concepts will be introduced including thermal strain, surface properties, and viscoelasticity. Material biocompatibility will be introduced in regards to body responses including cell and tissue interaction, toxicity and safety. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 469 - Introduction to Human Physiology (3-0-3)
This course is not open to Biomedical Engineering students. Available to non-biomedical engineering students who have an interest in going on to medical, dental or allied health careers. An introduction to mammalian physiology, particularly the heart, circulation, lungs and kidneys. Effective Until: Fall 2003

BME 478 - Introduction to CAD for Biomechanics (2-2-3)
Prerequisites: BME 302 and Mech 320. Introduction to Computer Aided Designing and analysis as applied to biomedical engineering design programs. Topics include theoretical insight into the process of design and geometrical modeling and design using industry standard CAD (Computer Aided Design) software packages. The course will also include several projects involving the applicaiton of design principles to standard problems in biomedical design. Effective From: Spring 2007

BME 479 - BioMicroElectroMechanical Systems (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 301, BME 302, and BME 304. This course focuses on the study of the broad body of knowledge required to design, fabricate, and test BioMEMS. We define BioMEMS as any type of biomedical devices for the fabrication of which miniaturization techniques (at least in part) are required. BioMEMS are used in advanced analytical techniques (microfluidic devices), implantable chips, biomedical sensors and actuators, and in-vitro tissue modeling. BioMEMS for diagnosis as well as for cell biology and tissue engineering are studied. This course provides a hands-on approach to BioMEMS and microfluidic devices and allows students to design, fabricate, and characterize their own BioMEMS. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 488 - Introduction to Nanotechnology (2-2-3)
This course introduces students to nanotechnology through a variety of topics that cover nanoscience and nanotechnology from different points of view including engineering, chemistry, biology, management, ethics, public safety and policy, mathematics, etc. The course is designed in a studio format that complements lectures with hands-on experimental activities. The course will feature on or two lectures per semester given by invited nanotechnology-experts from NJIT or elsewhere. This course is mandatory for any student willing to take the Minor in Nanotechnology. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 489 - Medical Instrumentation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 372, BME 310. This course covers the hardware and instrumentation needed to measure variables from different physiological systems. The following topics will be taught: electrodes, sensors and transducers. Bioelectric amplifiers, electrical safety and computing. Applications include the study and design of instrumentation for measurement of the ECG, EEG, EMG, respiratory system, nervous system in general. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 491 - Research and Independent Study I (3-0-3)
In depth research experience taught under the guidance of a professor typically within a laboratory. Approved requirements are needed for engineering credit. Research thesis required. Needs permission of professor.

BME 492 - Research and Independent Study II (1-2-3)
Prerequisite: BME 491. Approved requirements are needed for engineering credit. Research thesis required. Needs permission of professor. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 495 - Capstone Design I (2-3-3)
Prerequisites: Senior standing and (BME 372 or MTSE 301 or (Mech 236 and Mech 320).The goal of this course is to provide students with the guidance to choose a capstone design topic and advisor conduct library/search engine background research and to prepare the design proposal for their chosen project. The course introduces the student to the definition of design as well as introducing issues of intellectual property, bioethics and safety, and professional societies. Effective From: Fall 2014

BME 496 - Capstone Design 2 (1-3-3)
Prerequisites: BME 495 Implementation of the project approved in BME 495. This portion of the project includes library research, time and cost planning, oral and written reports, as well as construction, troubleshooting and demonstration of a working prototype. Effective From: Fall 2014

GRADUATE COURSES:

BME 593 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience IV (0 credits)
Prerequisites: One immediately prior 3-credit registration for graduate co-op work experience with the same employer. Requires approval of departmental co-op advisor and the Division of Career Development Services. Must have accompanying registration in a minimum of 3 credits of course work. Effective From: Fall 2006

BME 601 - Seminar (3 credits )
Required every semester of all master's students in biomedical engineering who receive departmental or research-based support and all doctoral students. To receive a satisfactory grade, students must attend at least five seminars per semester, as approved by the seminar supervisor.

BME 611 - Engineering Aspect of Molecular and Cellular Bio I (1 credit)
Molecular and cellular biology is a foundation of the understanding of the biological sciences and is vital to the study of advanced biomedical engineering. This course is to be taken simultaneously with UMDNJ N551 to enrich the crossover between engieering and life sciences. Course topics parallel those covered in N551 and both add engineering relevance, and provide engineering students with a stronger understanding of molecular and cellular biology. For students in joint BME PhD program. Effective From: Fall 2009

BME 612 - Engineering Aspects of Molecular and Cellular Bio 2 (1 credit)
Molecular and cellular biology is a foundation of the understanding of the biological sciences and is vital to the study of advanced biomedical engineering. This course is to be taken simultaneously with UMDNJ N552 to enrich the crossover between engineering and life sciences. Course topics parallel those covered in N552 and both add engineering relevance, and provide engineering students with a stronger understanding of molecular and cellular biology. For students in joint BME PhD program. Effective From: Fall 2009

BME 627 - Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (3 credits)
Prerequisite: undergraduate courses in thermodynamics and differential equations. Introduction to the structure and composition of the body followed by an exploration of the properties of the blood and its flow in the cardiovascular system; the body as a heat source and as a series of compartments involved in the mass transfer of materials (such as those in the kidneys and lungs). Design of artificial kidneys and heart-lung machines is also explored. Same as ChE 627.

BME 651 - Principles of Tissue Engineering (3-0-3)
Tissue Engineering is a therapeutic approach to treating damaged or diseased tissues in the biotechnology industry. In essence, new and functional living tissue can be fabricated using living cells combined with a scaffolding material to guide tissue development. Such scaffolds can be synthetic, natural, or a combination of both. This course will cover the advances in the fields of cell biology, molecular biology, and materials science towards developing novel "tissue engineered" materials. Effective From: Spring 2005

BME 652 - Cellular and Molecular Tissue Engineering (3 credits)
This course explores molecular, cellular and tissue level interactions that are an important component of all tissue engineering strategies. Topics include how a cell moves, reacts and maintains viability and function based on its surroundings. We will discuss how to engineer our materials, tissue grafts and implants to integrate with the body. We will also liearn about bodily reactions and the biocompatibility of tissue engineered devices such as immunoreactivity and blood coagulation. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 653 - Micro/Nanotechnologies for Interfacing Live Cells (3 credits)
In this course, we will study technologies and tools available for interfacing live cells from a sub-cellular, single-cell, and multi-cellular (tissue models) approach. We will introduce key concepts of the biology of cells and tissues and will explore the technologies (micro-/nanotechnologies) and tools (sensors and actuators) available for the investigation of cell and tissue biology. Same as ECE 653. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 654 - Cardiovascular Mechanic (3 credits)
Fundamental biomechanical mechanisms at work in the cardiovascular system. Topics include the fundamental molecular structure of heart muscle, the biomechanical principles that transform the contraction of heart muscle into stress-strain functions of muscle fibers, pressure-volume flow relations in the vasculature when it is considered as a hemodynamic (blood hydraulic) system, growth and disease of the cardiovascular system, resistance, compliance, inertance, and catheter-tip transducers. Effective From: Fall 2011

BME 655 - Advanced Characterization of Biomaterials (3-0-3)
Methods used to discover the structures of proteins, enzymes, DNA, and carbohydrates at the molecular level, as well as complex structures such as collagen, the chromosome, and the cell. Topics will include protein and DNA sequencing, separation methods, and spectroscopies such as 2 and 3D NMR, x-ray diffraction, SEM, AFM and microscopic imaging techniques. Effective From: Spring 2012

BME 661 - Neural Engineering (3 credits )
Neural Engineering focuses on understanding how the brain functions using engineering principles. The course discusses different instrumentation and signal processing algorithms to study how the brain functions, how to detect different pathologies and new applications for research. Topics include; basic overview of neurology, vector populations, neural networks, vision research, functional MRI, functional electrical stimulation, neural prosthetics, and other advanced research topics studying neurology.

BME 667 - Bio-Control Systems (3 credits)
The course provides an introduction to dynamic and control in biological systems, with particular emphasis on engineering aspects of biological oscillators/waves which govern the basic operations of all living organisms and especially higher order life forms. A combination of theoretical and simulation tools will be applied to analyze the qualitative and quantitative properties of selected biological systems. Feedback and control mechanisms in selected biological systems will be introduced. Same as ECE 667. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 668 - Medical Imaging Systems (3 credits)
This course provides a detailed introduction to medical imaging physics, instrumentation, data acquisition and image processing systems for reconstruction of multi-dimensional anatomical and functional medical images. Three-Dimensional medical imaging modalities including X-ray, Computer Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Single Photon Emission Computer Tomography, Positron Emission Tomography, Ultrasound and optical imaging modalities are included. Same as ECE 668. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 669 - Engineering Physiology (3 credits)
To enable students to apply basic tools in engineering analysis, mathematics, computer science, general physics and chemistry courses so that they can develop models that quantitatively predict the functioning of physiological systems in the human body. To enable students to apply engineering systems analysis to systematic physiology and employ the ideas of feedback control, signal procession, mathematical modeling and numerical simulation. Same as ECE 669. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 670 - Introduction to Biomechanical Engineering (3 credits )
Prerequisites: undergraduate thermodynamics, statics, and dynamics. Introduction to biomechanical engineering of physiological systems; fluid flow, structural, motion, transport, and material aspects; energy balance of the body, and the overall interaction of the body with the environment. Same as ME 670.

BME 671 - Biomechanics of Human Structure and Motion (3 credits)
Prerequisites: undergraduate statics, kinematics, and dynamics. Principles of engineering mechanics and materials science applied to human structural and kinematic systems and to the design of prosthetic devices. Topics include anatomy; human force systems; human motion; bioengineering materials; and design of implants, supports, braces, and replacements limbs.

BME 672 - Biomaterials (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Mech 232 (see undergraduate catalog for description) or the equivalent. Materials and processes used to develop devices that are implanted in the human body; clinical aspects of biomechanical engineering; federal government requirements for design and testing of human implant devices; biocompatibility, metal implant devices, material design parameters, plastic and ceramic devices, sterilization techniques, and their effect on biocompatibility.

BME 673 - Biorobotics (3 credits )
Basics of control of a robot and telemanipulation are studied. Computer simulations, MATLAB are used to explore biomimetic autonomous robots. This is a studio-based course with hands-on exercises with small robots and actuators. Topics include understanding how biological robots (humans and animals) differ from designed robots, as well as sensors (touch, stereo and position), actuators (muscles, smart materials), and intelligent (neural and computer controlled systems. Effective From: Spring 2009

BME 674 - Principles of Neuromuscular Engineering (3 credits )
Neurophysiology, motor control and robotics are used to study the human motor system. Sensorimotor learning and acquisition of new motor skills are emphasized. Topics include the central nervous system, muscle properties, spinal motor circuitry and dynamics of limb motion. The relation of motor control problems to neurophysiology of the motor system and how motor disorders affect movement control are studied. MATLAB and Simulink are used in simulations and movement date analysis. Effective From: Fall 2009

BME 675 - Computer Methods in Biomedical Engineering (3 credits )
This course uses MATLAB to concentrate on methods that allow students to produce original software that can be used to acquire, process, analyze and present data. Topics include advanced graphics and animation, graphical user interfaces, interfacing to and data acquisition from laboratory instrumentation, filtering and processing of acquired data, and interfacing to user interfaces (e.g. joysticks). Applications in speech, bioelectrical signals, images and virtual reality will be included. Effective From: Fall 2009

BME 676 - Computational Biomechanics (3 credits)
Prerequisites: BME 670 or equivalent. The use of commercially available software to solve complex engineering problems has become standard practice to reduce time and cost and results in a better product. This is an intro course on computational methods and the use of commercial software such as ANSYS, Fluent, and MATLAB to solve problems related to the BME device industry. Suitable for students interested in Computer Aided Design and Engineering (CAD/CAE). Effective From: Fall 2010

BME 677 - CAD for Biomechanics and Biomaterials (3-0-3)
Introduction to Computer Aided Design theory and application using software. Topics include datum planes, extrude, cut, sweep, swept cuts, and parallel, rotational, and general blends. Assemblies and generating, dimensioning, editing, and modifying drawing views and creation of balloons, imaging and scanning techniques of anatomical structures such as bone and arteries and 3D printing are also covered. Effective From: Fall 2011

BME 678 - Design of Orthopedic Implants (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 677. First of a two part course on design of orthopedic implants using ProEngineer. Additional topics include machanical properties of implant materials, material selection and introduction to FEA. Methods for prototype development with the use of 3D printing will also be discussed. A critical objective of this course is the preparetion of design reports and project presentations. Effective From: Spring 2012

BME 679 - Advanced Design of Orthopedic Implants (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: BME 677, BME 678 or equivalent. Advanced modeling techniques for the design of hip, knee, and spine implants. Mechanical properties of materials, including wear and failure modes associated with typical implants. Kinematics and surgical protocols of implants will be discussed. Course will cover assemblies and FEA analysis of implants. Additional topics include large deformations, fatigue, optimization, review and analysis of results. Effective From: Fall 2011

BME 680 - BioMEMS Design and Applications (3 credits)
The advance of bioMEMS (Micro Electrical Mechanical Systems) technology is a key component in making the next generation medical diagnostic tools possible. We will learn how bioMEMS devices are fabricated and combine engineering analysis with knowledge of known biological responses and biomolecule interactions to understand how bioMEMS are designed and function. Topics will include biological, mechanical, electrical, and chemical biosensors, and microfluidics as applied to biotechnology. Effective From: Fall 2009

BME 681 - Medical Imaging (3 credits )
The basic principles of medical imaging: physical basis, signal acquisition, image formation and image processing. Image modalities include x-rays, computed tomography CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, positron image tomography (PET), and functional MRI (fMRI).

BME 683 - BioMicroElectroMechanical Systems (3 credits )
Prerequisites: Knowledge of mechanics, optics, electromagnetism and general chemistry. Micro- and nanosystems used in advanced analytical techniques for microfluidic devices, implantable chips, non-invasive biomedical sensors, DNA chips and microelectronic array systems. Microelectronic processing design for micromaching and piezoelectric materials for biomedical applications. Biomedical sensors and actuators. BioMEMS active ultrasonic transducers for medical imaging, for micro-valves and for implantable medication delivery systems are studied.

BME 684 - Medical Device Development (3 credits)
This course will provide a detailed overview of medical device development from a realistic industrial and academic perspective. The processes used in corporations and academic laboratories to conceive and develop devices will be explored from a research, regulatory, clinical, QA/QC, marketing, engineering, and legal perpective under the umbrella of project management techniques. Material will be presented as an aide to students who wish to decide on careers in either industry or academia. Effective From: Fall 2010

BME 686 - Intro. to Instrumentation for Physiomeasurements (3-0-3)
Introduction to instrumentation for students without instrumentation background only. This course teaches the hardware and instrumentation needed to measure variables from different physiological systems. Electrodes, sensors and transducers, bioelectric amplifiers safety and digital acquisition will be discussed. Hardware for measurement of the ECG, EEG, EMG, respiratory system, nervous system, clinical laboratory instruments, electrical safety and computers in biomedical instrumentation. Effective From: Fall 2011

BME 687 - Design of Medical Instrumentation (3 credits )
Prerequisite: undergraduate course in electronics. Principles and practice of medical instrumentation. Instrument components and medical instrument systems design. Examples taken from electrocardiography, clinical chemistry, medical imaging. Microprocessor-based systems emphasized.

BME 688 - Virtual Biomedical Instrumentation (3-0-3)
Introductory course to the programming language, LabVIEWTM. Topics include loops, arrays, clusters, data acquisition, and file input/output. Students will learn how to apply these basic concepts into the development of algorithms. Examples relevant to the biomedical industry will be given how to debug and solve complex programming problems. By the completion of the course, students will be able to develop programs to automate processes and experimental designs. Effective From: Spring 2014

BME 698 - Selected Topics (3 credits)
Selected topics for Biomedical Engineering.

BME 700 - Master's Project (3 credits)
Prerequisite: written approval of project advisor. An extensive paper involving design, construction, and analysis, or theoretical investigation. Joint projects with industry or governmental agencies may be acceptable. Work is carried out under the supervision of a member of the department faculty.

BME 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisite: written permission from thesis advisor. Projects include design, construction, experimental or theoretical investigation of the engineering applications to the diagnosis and/or treatment of disease. Research may be in cooperation with industry or medical institutions. Completed work should be of sufficient quality to be acceptable for publication. Oral presentations are required.

BME 710 - Foundations of Biomedical Research (3 credits )
This course provides an overview of biomedical research issues as they relate to biomedical engineering. The course provides students with a working knowledge of the fundamental tools of: 1) a critical literature review, 2) research design, 3) bioethics, 4) statistical analysis of data, 5) protection of animal and human subjects, 6) patent protection and 7) FDA regulations.

BME 725 - Independent Study I (3 credits )
Prerequisite: departmental approval. Program of study prescribed and approved by student's faculty coordinator. This special course covers areas of study in which one or more students may be interested but is not of sufficiently broad interest to warrant a regular course offering. Master's degree students cannot count BME 725 as degree credit but can count these credits to qualify for full-time status.

BME 726 - Independent Study II (3 credits )
Prerequisite: departmental approval. Program of study prescribed and approved by student's faculty coordinator. This special course covers areas of study in which one or more students may be interested but is not of sufficiently broad interest to warrant a regular course offering. Master's degree students cannot count BME 725 as degree credit but can count these credits to qualify for full-time status. This course is not available to master's students.

BME 772 - Adv Topics in Biomaterials for the Lab and Clinic (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: BME 672 or equivalent. Background in Materials Science is encouraged. Advanced course on the design, characterization and clinical/research performance of biomaterials that have or may receive acceptance in medicine or as a biomedical research tool. The course requires the student to integrate background in chemistry, physics, cell and molecular biology, tissue engineering and materials science to review and summarize the scientific rationale for materials that have gained acceptance as medical devices, cell culture or diagnostic tools. Effective From: Fall 2013

BME 774 - Principles of Neurorehabilitation (3 credits)
This is a research-focused course providing in-depth review of current studies in the following fields: Pathophysiology of disability; Advanced therapeutic interventions; Emerging neurorehabilitation technologies that are intended to encourage neural reorganization and relearning; Novel interfaces through chronic implementation in the brain, spinal cord and muscles used in deep brain stimulation, brain-machine interfaces, and functional electrical stimulation and Methods of assessing outcomes. Effective From: Spring 2010

BME 788 - Selected Topics (3 credits)
Selected topics for Biomedical Engineering.

BME 790 - Doctoral Dissertation (Credits as designated )
Required of all students working toward the Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering. A minimum of 36 credits is required. The student must register for at least 6 credits of dissertation per semester; registration for additional credits may be permitted beyond the 6, with the approval of the advisor, up to a maximum of 12 credits per semester. If the student is still actively engaged in the research after completion of 36 credits, continued registration of 3 credits per semester is required.

BME 792 - Pre-Doctoral Research (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Permission of the department. For students admitted to the program leading to the Ph.D. in Computer Engineering or Electrical Engineering. Research carried on under the supervision of a designated member of the department faculty. If the student's research activity culminates in doctoral research in the same area, up to a maximum of 6 credits may be applied toward the 36 credits required under BME 790 after the student fulfills requirements of doctoral candidacy.

UMDNJ 313 - Membranes and Transport (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 501 - General Pathology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 5040 - Biostatistics (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 507 - Introduction to Animal Experiments (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 602 - Principles of Pharmacology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 605 - Advanced Biometrics (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 610 - Topics in Biochemical Pharmacology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 612 - Clinical Pharmacology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 701 - Human Physiology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 703 - General Endocrinology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 704 - Neuroscience (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 705 - Cardiorespiratory Physiology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 715 - Neurophysiology Seminar (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.

UMDNJ 716 - Microcirculatory Physiology (null)
For more details go to UMDNJ website.