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Architecture:   Offered by the College of Architecture and Design
 
UNDERGRADUATE COURSES:

Arch 155 - Modes of Design Communication I (2-3-3)
Techniques of graphic presentation introduced as a basic language of architecture. Students work with a broad range of graphic presentation methods. Skills developed in drawing and architectural delineation. Fundamentals of perspective drawing, rendering techniques and format layout examined through an array of projects.

Arch 156 - Modes of Design Communication II (2-4-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 155. This course deals with advanced knowledge and skill acquisition of the diverse categories of information delivery required by the design professionals. Effective From: Spring 2007

Arch 163 - Introduction to Design I (1-12-5)
Introduction to an array of basic principles and elements of design. Emphasis on design methods, sensitivity to context, manipulation of form and space, and representation skills. General design fundamentals presented in the lecture hour.

Arch 164 - Introduction to Design II (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 163. A continuation of Arch 163.

Arch 223 - Construction I (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to construction processes, focusing on wood, steel, masonry, concrete materials and their related assemblies. Effective From: Fall 2011

Arch 225 - Building Systems I (0-3-3)
This course is an introductory survey of the general principles and application of Sustainable Design, Site Systems, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems, Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low-rise wood and steel structures. Effective From: Fall 2007 Until: Spring 2013

Arch 227 - Environmental Control Systems I (3-0-3)
This course introduces passive environmental design emphasizing sun, wind, daylight, heat flow, insulation/mass, visual comfort, thermal comfort, shading, climate, natural ventilation. The course uses ecotect software for thermal analysis. Effective From: Spring 2012

Arch 229 - Structures I (3-0-3)
This course begins with the history of building structures, continues by introducing structural behavior, forces and responses in structural systems, and concludes with an introduction to static structural analysis. Effective From: Spring 2012

Arch 251 - History of Architecture I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Hum 101. Introduces architectural history, theory and design, providing a conceptual framework for looking at the built environment. This course introduces key architectural concepts beginning with the earliest examples of human occupation, the shaping of space, and the transformation of natural landscape. Its geographic scope is global and its chronological scope ranges from prehistory to the middle ages. Effective From: Fall 2011

Arch 252 - History of Architecture II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 251. This survey of the social, political, technological, functional, and aesthetic concerns of architectue, urban forms, and built and natural landscapes is a continuation of Arch 251. It covers the period from the 15th century to 1900 in Europe, the Americas, the Middle East, and Asia. Among its emphases are the impact and significance of absolutism, colonialism, nationalism, humanism, the enlightenment, industrialization and modernity. Effective From: Spring 2012

Arch 263 - Architecture Studio I (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 164. Utilizing knowledge and skills gained in Introduction to Design I and II, students learn about architectural design. Examination of the technological, social and environmental issues as they relate to architectural design. Lecture hour used to explore in-depth aspects of architecture.

Arch 264 - Architecture Studio II (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 263. A continuation of Arch 263. Lecture hour used to explore in-depth aspects of architectural design.

Arch 282 - Structural Principles (3-0-3)
Introduces structural statics through timber and steel design. Influences of materials and structural system choice analyzed relative to their impact on building design. Responsibilities of the architect during the structural design phase are introduced. Effective From: Fall 2013

Arch 283 - Special Topics (3)
Investigation of problem of special interest in architecture.

Arch 301 - Digital Modeling and Fabrication (3-0-3)
The seminar in Digital Modeling and Fabrication is a 3-credit course for upper level students exploring advanced 3-dimensional computer modeling techniques and data export for assembly and fabrication to various computer numerically controlled (CNC) hardware available at the School of Architecture. Specifically, students engage in NURBS and solid modeling using Rhinoceros 3D and export data through various Rhino plug-ins including RhinoCAM, which writes G- and M- Codes for 2 and 3D milling operations. CNC hardware available as of Spring 2010 includes two (2) Universal Laser Cutters, each with 18" x 32" beds; two (2) Z-Corporation Z-310 3 dimensional printers; and a Precix 9100 Industrial CNC Router with a 48" x 96" bed. Students model and fabricate full scale assemblies individually and in teams and contribute to a final exhibition of student work. Familiarity with various software tools available at the College of Architecture and Design is encouraged but not required. Admission to the course to students in their second year of study by discretion of instructor. Effective From: Fall 2010

Arch 310 - Co-op Work Experience I (3)
Prerequisites: completion of the third year studio class, approval of the school and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Students gain major-related work experience and reinforcement of their academic program. A designated faculty member monitors and evaluates the student's work and project. Requirements include mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report and/or project. Apply in third year.

Arch 312 - Environmental Education I (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 264. Involves architecture students in working with grade school or high school students in the solution of a joint environmental design project. Participants first work toward developing their own understanding and sensitivity of the manmade environment. Emphasis on learner-directed and discovery-guided inquiry, and educational methods to increase awareness of the physical settings created for human activities. Projects developed in nearby schools which focus on the interaction of individuals and small groups with the environment.

Arch 316 - Computer Applications to Architecture (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: CIS 104. Introduces both philosophical and technical approaches to the use of the computer in architectural design and analysis. Explores the use of existing computer programs for spatial allocation, energy analysis, life cycle costing, problem analysis, and computer simulation. Projects include development of computer programs applicable to architecture.

Arch 317 - Advanced Architectural Graphics (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 155, Arch 264. Gives students advanced techniques for architectural expression, including Chinese ink wash and air brush techniques. Emphasis on how drawing may be used to reveal the inner qualities of design. A basic knowledge of drawing methods, media, materials, and projection techniques is assumed.

Arch 318 - New York City Lab (1-6-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. Explores the architectural and environmental development of New York City during the past 200 years in an organized series of field trips. Each week's trip encompasses a section and/or representative aspect of the city's evolution. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Arch 323 - Construction II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 223. This course surveys enclosure joints and assemblies, including roofing, insulation, doors, windows, glass and hybrid systems. It also focuses on interior and exterior finishes and their construction methodology and documentation, including Building Information Modeling (BIM). Effective From: Fall 2012

Arch 327 - Environmental Control Systems II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 227. This course focuses on active mechanical systems related to environmental controls including HVAC, plumbing, electrical and alternative energy systems. Additional areas covered include, elevators, electric lighting and acoustics. The course continues the use of ecotect software as an analytical tool.

Arch 328 - Urban Values (2-3-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 363. A survey of urban planning practice and historical, contemporary, and theoretical urban design approaches. Considers the physical environment as a response to human values, and explores how nature, the city, and the user influence the form and content. Case studies include cities, towns, and specialized recreation and retirement communities. Laboratory work includes field trips, demonstration exercises, and analysis of case studies. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Arch 329 - Structures II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 229. This course examines lateral forces, foundations, stability, deflection, long spans and special case structural systems. Methodology involves advanced static structural analysis.

Arch 331 - Landscape Architecture (3-0-3)
An overview of the opportunities and constraints of landscape designs. Emphasis on developing a practical understanding of the potentials of earth, water and plants in architecture. Students given an overview of social and ecological determinants of relations between land and buildings.

Arch 332 - Architecture: Image and Word I (2-3-3)
This course will present films on Architecture in which architects are speaking about and showing their own work. What we think is true about architecture is often wrong. Single images tend to abstract and greatly simplify why and how great architecture is created. Rarely are buildings seen in their content. Rarely are climatic, cultural and technical issues of design illustrated. As a result, we often speculate about architecture based upon superficial or incomplete information. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 333 - Architecture: Image and Word II (2-3-3)
This course will present films on Architecture in which architects are speaking about and showing their own work. Theoreticians provide "facts" to create a unified theory of design, which may lie outside the realm of historical reality, or the intention of the architect. The culture of architectural education and the nature of the design studio results in second hand knowledge, and design myth. Surveys of modern architecture leave a fragmentary memory of great works of architecture. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 334 - Color Theory/Electronic Color (3-0-3)
The multiple-media course includes lectures with supplemental readings, videos, in-class analysis and laboratory work, and homework requiring a variety of media including watercolor and computer graphics - all of which address a range of issues including interaction of color, psychology of color, design for color deficient vision, color mixing and color palettes, color reproduction, color models, color composition in art and architecture, and others. Digital applications are integrated throughout. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 335 - Digital Tectonics (3-0-3)
This course uses 3D modeling tools to investigate the relationship of digital models to physical construction. The term digital tectonics refers to an idea regarding the qualities of works of contemporary architecture that seem to be influenced by the use of digital tools. In this course, students are asked to investigate this hypothesis by testing structure, skin, assemblage, form and space making methodologies that are aided by digital tools and rationalized through digital operations. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 337 - Building Information Modeling (3-0-3)
This course explores both technical and philosophical approaches to the use of the computer in architectural analysis, design development, information management, and document delivery. Autodesk Building Systems and Autodesk Revit Building will be used for 3D modeling and 2D documentation employing a systems-approach framework for spatial allocation, energy analysis, and structural considerations. The workings of the foundational information databases of the respective software will be thoroughly explored. Projects requirements will include building program resolution, solar analysis, asset scheduling, document layout, and design visualization. Proficiency with Autodesk Autocad (2D) and understanding of general CAD principles are required prerequisites; the formal prerequisite course is Arch 316/647. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 363 - Architecture Studio III (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 264, Arch 223, Arch 227 and Arch 229. This course is a continuation of Arch 264. Lecture hour explores the nature of technology, environment, and social order as they relate to studio work. Course materials purchase required. Effective From: Spring 2013

Arch 364 - Architecture Studio IV (1-12-5)
Prerequisites: Arch 363. A continuation of Arch 363. Lecture hour explores in depth the nature of technology, environment, and social order as they relate to studio work. Students will be required to purchase course materials.

Arch 381 - History of Architecture III (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 252. A continuation of Arch 252, this course surveys global developments in architecture, urban planning, and landscape design in the first half of the 20th century. It examines the continued architectural impact of industrialization and modernization and the geo-political consequences of World War I and World War II on the built environment. The focus is on the development and diffusion of modernism and its relationship to such key concepts as universalism, regionalism, historicism, and utopia. Effective From: Fall 2012

Arch 382 - History of Architecture IV (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 381. The last in the sequence of history surveys, this course examines global developments in modern and contemporary architecture and urbanism after World War II and into the 21st century. Social uprisings, economic recessions, post-colonialism, modernization in the developing world, mass production and mass consumption, environmentalism, sustainability, and the computer revolution of the information age provide the historical and cultural framework for the course. The course pays particular attention to early extensions and critiques of modernism, the emergence of postmodernism and current efforts to reevaluate modernism's legacy. Effective From: Spring 2013

Arch 403 - The American Home and Household I (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. A cultural, architectural analysis of American homes and households throughout history. Included are the Puritan society and Colonial home, the Victorian home and family, the frontier homestead, 19th century utopian communes, immigrants, the working class poor and urban tenements, war housing, and suburban homes. Students explore the meaning, use and design of each domestic setting from the point of view of society, the family and the individual, considering differences based on race, sex and class. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Arch 404 - The American Home and Household II (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: junior or senior standing. Analyzes the architecture of 20th century American homes and households, hotels, apartment houses, war housing, suburban homes, public projects, collectives, communes, self-help housing, and housing concepts for the future. Psychological, sociological, and cultural perspectives are considered insofar as they affect the architecture of the home. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Arch 408 - Advanced Landscape Architecture ( 2-3-2)
Prerequisite: Arch 331. Introduces the design, construction and management of contemporary landscape projects through case studies, field trips, and personal contact with prominent practicing landscape architects. A historical perspective of landscape architecture is used as a context for discussion.

Arch 410 - Co-op Work Experience II (3)
Prerequisites: Arch 310 or approval of the school and permission of the Office of Cooperative Education and Internships. Provides major-related work experience. A designated faculty member monitors and evaluates the student's work and project. Requirements include mandatory participation in seminars and completion of a report and/or project.

Arch 419 - Architectural Photography (2-3-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. Gives a wide range of photographic solutions for presentations and portfolios. Lectures consist of orientation on general topics, including light and space, using relevant text selections and slide presentations for reinforcement. Includes basic demonstrations of darkroom techniques and unorthodox methods to encourage experimentation.

Arch 422 - Mythical House (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 172, Arch 252, Arch 363. Shows that the house develops not only in response to reasoning, laws of physics, and biological needs, but also in response to magic, ritual, culture, personality, fantasy, and dreams. Effective Until: Spring 2014

Arch 423 - Construction III (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 323. This course focuses on non-normative systems, hybrid and integrated assemblies and new materials. An emphasis is placed on systems integration, materials selection, specifications and construction documents associated with the comprehensive design of buildings using Building Information Modeling (BIM)

Arch 429 - Structures III (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 329. This course focuses on wood systems analysis, steel systems analysis, indeterminate systems and integrated structural systems. Methodology involves finite member analysis.

Arch 431 - Advanced Representational Techniques (3-0-3)
This course is intended for upper level architecture students who have completed a number of academic or professional projects. Students must have a basic understanding of computer use. Topics covered will be critical analysis of content, organization of material, and translation of existing work. Instruction will be given in layout software packages such as Adobe Illustrator. Direction will also be given in web site design using Macromedia Flash in an architectural content. Effective From: Spring 2008 Until: Spring 2014

Arch 432 - P3 Post Presentation Processing (2-3-3)
The project is deemed Architecture, with a capital A, but there remains nagging questions: What would the project be like if viewed stereoscopically? If it were rendered as a 360 degree panoramic view, what would the space be like? If it was accurately superimposed into the site (lighting, color, texture, camera angle), does the design improve when in the context? Would rendering styles using "natural media" be more descriptive? What would the architecture be like at night? Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 433 - Cinematic Literacy for Architects & Urban Designers (3-0-3)
This course will use the digital video camera, digital compositing, and interactive DVD to introduce alternate means of communicating architectural ideas. The course will explore narrative techniques, linear and random-access sequencing and will cover critical analysis of film technique, storyboarding, and the authoring of short vignettes. The final project will be a digital image set on authored DVD expressing an architectural case study of a chosen building, site analysis, and/or urban issue. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 434 - Simulated Environments (3-0-3)
This course will explore the application of desktop, non-immersive virtual reality to the representation of architecture. Course exercises and projects are designed to uncover both advantages and limitations of this emerging technology, on both practical and theoretical levels. The major focus of the course will be personal evaluation of these tools in the design of both object-specific and the spatial in architectural problem solving. The collaborative nature of the toolkit will inform design decisions vis-a-vis observation of participant behavior and open discussion with interactive critics. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 460 - Studio Abroad (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. Studio coursework taken fully or partially abroad with an emphasis on urban design and recognition of local conditions and situations. Lecture hour coordinates with studio subject matter. Course materials purchase required. Effective From: Spring 2012

Arch 463 - Option Studio 1 (1-12-5)
Studio methodology allows the students to select from various building programs, the nature of design dealing with technology, environment and the social order. Lecture hour coordinates with studio subject matter. Course materials purchase required. Effective From: Fall 2011

Arch 464 - Option Studio II (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 463. Studio methodology allows students to select from various building programs, the nature of design dealing with technology, environment and the social order. Effective From: Fall 2007

Arch 472 - Architectural Programming and Project Development (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 264. Covers the essentials for programming a building and understanding the full scope of project development that precedes and follows the programming phase. Identify major stakeholders in the building design and production process and examine their roles. Lectures and assignments include: user requirements and client values, methods of pro forma analysis for project development and approval, and how the development process changes over time.

Arch 483/483H - Special Topics (3)
Group investigation of problem of special interest in architecture.

Arch 491 - Independent Study (1)
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Arch 492 - Independent Study (2)
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Arch 493 - Independent Study (3)
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Arch 525 - Building Systems VII (0-3-3)
Prerquisite: Arch 425. This is an advanced course that uses in-depth, detailed case studies of four to six well-designed buildings of various types, from small scale to large, from simple to complex, to illustrate the totality of building systems integration. Effective From: Fall 2007 Until: Spring 2013

Arch 530 - Methodologies of Architectural History, Theory and Criticism (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. A seminar examining the salient methodologies of architectural history, theory and criticism. Structured around a series of critical texts, with each set of core readings intended to provide a basis for analyzing and assessing the approach in question.

Arch 531A - History of Renaissance Architecture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. An examination of the development of Renaissance architecture and urban design in Italy and elsewhere in Europe. The re-emergence of the classical tradition is considered within the context of social, political and economic developments as well as formal intentions.

Arch 531B - History of Baroque Architecture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. An investigation of architectural development from the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe and Latin America, including consideration of stylistic variations, social and political factors, and trends in garden and urban design.

Arch 531C - History of Modern Architecture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. A study of major tendencies of architectural theory and practice from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. Formal and stylistic transformation is considered in relation to theoretical intentions as well as social, cultural, and technical developments.

Arch 531D - History of American Architecture (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. An investigation of the guiding ideals and dominant stylistic trends in American architecture and planning from colonial times to the mid-20th century. Critical shifts in conception and scope of architectural production considered in relation to the prevailing cultural, socio-economic, and technical contexts out of which they evolved.

Arch 531E - History of Non-Western Architecture ( 3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. An examination of major architectural traditions of China, Japan, Southeastern Asia, India, and the Middle East. Each area is considered with reference to a conceptual, iconographic and stylistic paradigm that evolved from a particular historical context.

Arch 531F - Thresholds of Architectural Theory (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. A seminar that investigates key thresholds of Western architectural theory, from Vitruvius to Robert Venturi, with emphasis on examining the corresponding critical theoretical texts and related didactic buildings and projects.

Arch 531H - Aspects of Urban Form (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. An examination of the major forms and patterns of urban development from classical antiquity to the 20th century, considered in relation to the changing conceptions of the city as well as cultural, socio-economic, and political development.

Arch 532 - Problems and Methods in Architectural Preservation (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. Theory and practice of preservation planning, with emphasis on current concepts, problems and techniques of area preservation in the United States. Exploration of the successive guiding ideals and _approaches to historic preservation in America, together with their European parallels and ante-edents. Discussion of theories of continuity and change in the urban environment and of planning concepts and techniques that further preservation planning objectives in relation to programs for community development and neighborhood conservation.

Arch 533 - Case Studies in Architectural Creativity (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. Considers creativity in architecture from psychological, philosophical and autobiographical perspectives. The buildings, writings and lives of contemporary architects are discussed in the context of general theories of creativity. Each student chooses an individual architect noted for creative accomplishments and prepares a case study of his or her life.

Arch 534 - History of Architectural Technology (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 382. Survey of the development of building methods and materials. Impact of structural and environmental technology on architectural form and the design process. The role of technology in contemporary architectural theory and practice, including the modern movement, is emphasized.

Arch 535 - History of Architectural Ideas (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 382. Discusses seminal architectural ideas in the western world from Vitruvius to the present day. Read books written by leading architectural theorists and analyze them in detail.

Arch 536 - Landscape and American Culture (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 331. As in architecture, the parallel discipline of landscape architecture involves artistic intention set in conjunction with utilitarian concerns. As such, designs on the land include the integration of the arts and sciences of human culture with nature. Discusses landscape as a manifestation of American culture.

Arch 537 - Advanced Structures (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 384. Covers advanced material in structures related to steel and wood design including: steel industrial buildings, rigid frames and earthquake design, wood structures under axial loads, and combined bending and axial loads.

Arch 538 - Sustainable Architecture (3-0-3)
Follows two precepts: accepting responsibility for the consequences of design decisions upon human well-being, and the long-term viability of natural systems. Topics include sustainable site design and development, environmentally sensitive building materials, lifecycle cost benefit analysis of building systems, and adaptive reuse.

Arch 539 - Advanced Construction (3-0-3)
Pre-requisite: Arch 242. Explores the relationship between an architect's design intention and the construction document. Design a small building or addition and complete construction drawings of the design. Addresses problems and procedures encountered by an architect during the construction documents phase. Effective Until: Spring 2013

Arch 540 - Acoustics (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 241, Arch 242, Arch 342. Architectural acoustics: how we hear, physics of sound and materials, aesthetics of design and the processes of construction. Audible sounds, their interaction, perception of echo and directional hearing are applied to interior and exterior building transmission, room acoustics, and setting acceptable acoustical environments.

Arch 543 - Lighting (2-2-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 386 and Arch 387 or equivalents. Explores, through modeling and calculation, the means by which architectural form and detail influence the luminous environment. Perceptual responses such as visual comfort and delight are examined. Topics include daylighting footprints, model design and testing, and computer-assisted light level analysis. Areas of investigation include the relationship between daylight and electric light in architecture; the variations of light with time; analysis of seasonal and weather differences; role of task in lighting strategies; and means of control for light quantity and quality.

Arch 545 - Case Studies in Architectural Technology (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Technological systems involved in the construction and use of buildings. Students conduct in-depth investigation of technology-related problems in architecture and construction. Case study method is used. Construction documents and reports are analyzed. Field visits are required.

Arch 546 - Designing and Optimizing the Building Enclosure (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 386, CIS 104. Considers the "building envelope,?? the boundary dividing the inside of a structure from the outside environment. Study and design optimal enclosures considering energy exchange, the relationship between energy and light, and life cycle costs.

Arch 547 - Special Topics in Computer Applications (2-2-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Evaluation, utilization, and development of computer programs for analysis, simulation and information management. Programs range from energy analysis, building structures analysis, and mechanical systems design to spatial allocation, graphics and computer-aided design. Different theories of information transformation and delivery used in terms of architectural applications. Course hardware ranges from computer-aided design and drafting systems, through micro and mini, to mainframe computers.

Arch 549 - Life Safety Issues in Contemporary Buildings (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Arch 386, Arch 387. A variety of life safety and comfort situations studied in terms of specific building types. Topics include building evacuation, compartmentalization, fire fighting and suppression, evaluation and testing of new building materials and systems, systems control and management. Special emphasis is on such building types as multi-use, high-density, schools, hospitals, and other institutional categories.

Arch 550 - Building Economics (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Economic issues and methods of analysis influencing the building process and product are presented. The focus is on relations between architectural decisions and economic consequences. Students use computer models to manage building cost data and conduct life cycle costing.

Arch 552 - Real Estate Analysis for Architects (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of the third year. Introduction to the economic, financial and political aspects of real estate and their effect on architectural decision-making. Topics include needs assessment, real estate appraisal, financial instruments, regulations and real estate, design as value-adding, and the effect of tax policies on real estate development.

Arch 556 - Systems Approach to Design and Construction (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: completion of the third year. Lectures, case studies and student projects on understanding human aspiration and needs through design. Topics include land, finance, management, technology, and labor.

Arch 557 - Problems in Modern Housing (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 382 Historical approach places housing in its social, economic, and political context. Attempts to provide decent, affordable and well-designed housing for broad segments of society are examined. Dwelling is examined through analysis of proto-typical design solutions in urban environments.

Arch 558 - Professional Architectural Practice (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. A forum for examination of the structure and practices of the profession of architecture. The formal and informal relationships between architects, and between architects and clients, government officials, and consultants are studied. Basic principles of office management for the small and large architectural firm are introduced.

Arch 559 - Social Issues in Housing (3-0-3)
Lecture/seminar explores the historical, economic, social, technological, and political basis for current American housing policy and practice. Examines government, community-based and private sector attempts, both failed and successful, at providing decent, affordable, and well-designed housing for broad segments of society. Student teams analyze and discuss, in a series of classroom debates, the housing and planning implications of controversial social problems from homelessness and racial segregation to caring for the elderly and people with HIV/AIDS with an emphasis on the role of the architect. Effective From: Spring 2013

Arch 563 - Comprehensive Studio I (1-12-5)
Prerequisites: Arch 464, Arch 423, Arch 327 and Arch 429. This studio focuses on the student's ability to assess, select, and conceptually integrate structural systems, building envelope systems, environmental systems, life-safety systems, and building service systems in the building design. Lecture hour coordinates with studio subject matter. Course materials purchase required. Effective From: Fall 2011

Arch 564 - Comprehensive Studio II (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 563. This Studio focuses on the student's ability to produce a comprehensive architectural project based on a building program and site that includes development of programmed spaces demonstrating an understanding of structural and environmental systems, building envelop systems, life-safety provisions, wall sections and building assemblies and the principles of sustainability. Lecture hour coordinates with studio subject matter. Course materials purchase required. Effective From: Spring 2012

Arch 565 - Comprehensive Studio Lab (0-3-1)
Prerequisites: Arch464. Corequisite: Arch 563 or Arch 564. Held in design studio each week, the lab consists of presentations by the instructor on relevant technical and life safety -issues and student exercises applying these principles to their current design studio project or to existing buildings.

Arch 566 - Advanced Architectural Design Studio (1-12-5)
Prerequisite: Arch 564. This is an advanced architectural design studio, post Comprehensive Studio, studying contemporary design theories, design methods and construction technologies. Emphasis is placed upon independent design research as it relates to the broad range of architectural practice. Exploratory and experimental architectural projects are the focus of the course. Effective From: Fall 2011

Arch 571 - Everyday Life in the Public Realm (3-0-3)
A significant portion of everyday life takes place in the public realm of streets, sidewalks, parks, transit stations, government buildings, commercial establishments, and cultural institutions. Focuses on recent descriptions and critiques of public space and proposals for change.

Arch 572 - Architecture and Social Change (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Architectural form is analyzed in relation to political, economic and technological change, and change in social values. Buildings and other designed environments such as parks, streets and neighborhoods are studied relative to the social processes and institutions that generate and transform them. The role of the design professions in initiating or supporting change also is considered

Arch 573 - Technologies for Community and Urban Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Advanced and traditional technologies analyzed with regard to their role in community and city design, construction and reconstruction. Emphasis on technological systems influencing location, configuration and use. Examples are infrastructures, communication systems and construction technologies. Develops skills in using methods to evaluate alternative technologies relative to their social, economic and physical promise, problems and feasibility.

Arch 574 - Case Studies in Community and Urban Design (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. In-depth investigation of specific real-world problems of urban or community design carried out using case method approach. Current practices in the U.S. and other countries studied using interviews with designers, developers, community groups and government agencies. Site visits, reports and other documents provide important sources of information. Final report with supporting documentation required.

Arch 576 - The Architecture of Utopia (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: senior standing. Seminar for the review of utopian projects that have attempted to embody and strengthen social ideas through transformations in the structuring of space. Architectural implications of different literary and philosophical utopias analyzed with an emphasis on those experimental proposals which were realized, in whole or in part, in built form.

Arch 583/583H - Special Topics (3)
Group investigation of problem of special interest in architecture.

Arch 584 - Video and Animation (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 363. Presents the concepts of 3-D surface modeling, rendering, key frame animation, and video production in the context of the design process using the computer program ALIAS STUDIO. Emphasizes the underlying geometric principles of surface modeling, the components of color theory and texture mapping, the principles of key frame animation, and video production. The project for the semester is a short animated video. Also discusses scene Description Language programming. Effective Until: Spring 2010

Arch 588 - Architoons (3-0-3)
Prerequisite: Arch 364. Through the medium of film, applies literary devices to architectural contexts, including caricature, parody, lampoon, satire and farce. Studies historical and contemporary animations and short films for their treatment of meaning, story line and sequence, timing, environmental and psychological mood, atmosphere and emotion. Using 3-D modeling and animation software, each student produces an animated short subject illustrating an architectural principle or providing a humorous look at architectural history and theory.

Arch 591 - Independent Study (1)
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Arch 592 - Independent Study (2)
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Arch 593 - Independent Study (3)
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GRADUATE COURSES:

Arch 500G - Advanced Architectural Graphics (3 credits)
Introductory computer science with applications in computer graphics for architecture. Emphasizes programming methodology using a high-level language as the vehicle to illustrate concepts. Basic concepts of computer systems, software engineering, algorithm design, programming languages, and data abstraction, with applications. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 501G - Architectural Design I (6 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Core Studio. Fundamentals of architectural design. Sequence of projects explore two- and three-dimensional design. Choice of form and aesthetics is related to spatial resolution of function and context. Design as a representational medium is emphasized. Taken concurrently with Arch 555G. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 502G - Architectural Design II (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 501G, Arch 528G, Arch 541G, Arch 555G. Core Studio. Extends the knowledge of design, basic concepts and ideas introduced in Arch 501G. Emphasis is on developing technical drawing, and model-making skills. Also covered are two- and three-dimensional composition. Links to the history and theory sequence are made. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 503G - Architectural Design III (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 500G, Arch 502G, Arch 529G, Arch 543G, and Arch 545G. Core Studio, Intermediate design studio. Introduction to structure. Properties of materials both physical and in the abstract. Builds on knowledge gained from construction and structures courses, spatial demands and design possibilities of different structural systems. Design of structure type, model and context, and comparisons of building typology for rational structure. Drawing and its role in design thinking. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 504G - Architectural Design IV (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 503G, Arch 542G, Arch 544G. Arch 548G. Corequisite:547G. Second semester intermediate design studio. Design of buildings and integration of systems, physical and conceptual. Design methodology generates new information on buildings as coherent assemblies of systems. Also covers analysis and synthesis of form and introduction to applications of computer-assisted design (CAD). Preparation of design portfolio will complete core studio sequence. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 505G - Advanced Design Options I (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 504G. Required vertical studio electives; must be taken sequentially. Covers arange of advanced design issues in depth: integration of organizational, social, technical, spatial, and aesthetic issues within consistently articulated applied design solutions. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 506G - Advanced Design Options II (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 504G. Required vertical studio electives; must be taken sequentially. Covers arange of advanced design issues in depth: integration of organizational, social, technical, spatial, and aesthetic issues within consistently articulated applied design solutions. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 507G - Advanced Design Options III (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 504G. Required vertical studio electives; must be taken sequentially. Covers arange of advanced design issues in depth: integration of organizational, social, technical, spatial, and aesthetic issues within consistently articulated applied design solutions. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 512G - Structures II ( 3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 511G, Arch 522G. Builds on information presented in Arch 511G. Emphasizes details and methods of concrete design, mixing, pouring and testing. Methods and details of steel design are summarized. Effective Until: Summer 2007

Arch 513G - Structures III (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Arch 512G. Review of methods and procedures for choosing structural systems. Overview of differences among wood, steel and concrete systems. Students are introduced to complex structural behavior, prestressed concrete and new structural technology.

Arch 527G - Situating Practice: Thresholds of Architectural Theory (3-0-3)
Prerequisites: Enrolment in Masters of Architecture Program or by permission of instructor. Western architectural theory dating from Vitruvius to the present time. Examines critical texts and studies related building and projects. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 528G - History of Architecture I (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Introduction to the history of architecture. Emphasis on classical architecture from antiquity to the modern period. Evolution of the various themes and theories that underlie western architecture is presented chronologically.

Arch 529G - History of Architecture II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Arch 528G. Continuation of Arch 528G. Introduces concepts of modernism and brings the history of western architecture to the contemporary period.

Arch 541G - Construction I (3 credits)
This course is an introductory survey of the general principles and application of Sustainable Design, Site Systems, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems, Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low-rise wood and steel structures. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 542G - Integrated Building Technologies (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 541G This course is an introductory survey of the interrelationship of the principles and applications of Sustainable Design, Site Design, Structural Systems, Environmental Systems, Envelope Systems and Materials and Assembly Systems. This course will primarily focus on low and medium-rise concrete and masonry structures and is coordinated with a studio design/build experience. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 543G - Environmental Control Systems I (3 credits)
An introductory survey of the basic principles of building, environmental control, and service systems as these relate to the building envelope. This course will primarily cover thermal enclosure, climate modification, environmental systems, energy use, and sustainable design. It also introduces the principles of health and safety in the design of buildings. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 544G - Environmental Control Systems II (3 credits)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the understanding of the principles, performance criteria, and applications of environmental and building service systems including lighting, acoustical, plumbing, electrical, vertical transportations, egress, communication, security, and fire protection systems. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 545G - Structures I (3 credits)
This is an intermediate course focusing on the principles of structural behavior in withstanding gravity and lateral forces and on the evolution, range, and appropriate application of structural systems and the criteria for selecting various structural systems in contemporary architecture. Specific architectural procedents from the 20th century are used as validating examples. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 546G - Structures: High Rise and Special Applications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 545G. This is an advanced course focusing on the integration of all building systems including new materials and methods as they relate to high-rise structures and other specialty building types. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 547G - 4D Integration (3 credits)
Arch 542G, Arch 544G, Arch 548G. Corecquisite: Arch 504G. This is a required, advanced design course that uses in-depth, detailed case studies of various construction types, from small scale to large, from simple to complex, to illustrate the totality of building systems integration. In conjunction with site visits, coursework will employ software to examine construction sequences, building components and shop drawings and their relationship to the design processes Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 548G - Structures II (3 credits)
Prerequisite: 545G. This is an advanced course dealing with structural computation that will conclude with rigorous case study investigation of hybrid and complex structural systems. Effective From: Spring 2014

Arch 555G - Architectural Graphics (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Documentary, descriptive and denotative media are introduced. Also covers methods of representation, delineation and reproduction. Skills are developed in technical drawing, perspective construction, projections, and format design. Taken concurrently with Arch 501G.

Arch 569G - Building and Development (3 credits)
Familiarization with the larger process of building production, of which architecture is one important part. Focus on the role of the architect in the areas of current building development: an examination of how redefinition or change might improve the process. Lectures deal with all factors of the building process and interviews with the various actors involved in designing, approving, financing and making buildings. Students have various assignments including a major term project.

Arch 579G - Professional Architectural Practice (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of M.Arch. core sequence. Review of the formal, informal, legal, and ethical obligations of the professional architect. Traditional relationships among the architect, clients, engineers and other participants in the design and building industry are studied. Principles of office management and problems of liability are introduced. Also fulfills core requirement of dual degree option for M.Arch./Master of Science in Management.

Arch 619 - Architectural Photography (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 501G, Arch 502G, Arch 503G. Photography for architectural presentations and portfolios. Lectures include orientation on light and space, slide presentations, and the use of text to reinforce photographic material. Demonstrations include basic darkroom techniques, and methods to encourage experimentation in photography.

Arch 630 - Methodology of Architectural History, Theory and Criticism (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. This seminar is structured around notable readings on architectural history, theory and criticism to provide students with a sound basis for critical analysis and assessment. It is recommended for students who select history and theory as their area of concentration.

Arch 631A - History of Renaissance Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Development of architecture and urban design in Italy and elsewhere in Europe during the Renaissance: re-emergence of the classical Greek and Roman architectural tradition; social, political and economic developments; formal intentions and transformations in the 16th and 17th centuries.

Arch 631B - History of Baroque Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. The emergence of baroque architecture and urban design in Rome in the 17th century; analysis of the works of Bernini, Borromini, Cortona and their contemporaries and successors through 1750. Development of baroque architecture elsewhere in Italy and Europe; late baroque and rococo; the advent of neo-classicism.

Arch 631C - History of Modern Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Major tendencies in architectural theory and practice from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. Formal and stylistic transformation considered in relation to theory, social, cultural, and technical developments.

Arch 631D - History of American Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Aesthetic, social, cultural and technical developments in American architecture and planning, from colonial times to the mid-20th century.

Arch 631E - History of Non-Western Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Examination of major architectural traditions and styles of China, Japan, Southeast Asia, India and the Middle East.

Arch 631F - Thresholds of Architectural Theory (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Seminar on Western architectural theory dating from Vitruvius to the present time. Examines critical texts and studies related building and projects. Effective Until: Fall 2013

Arch 631H - History and Theory of Infrastructure ( 3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. The historical role of infrastructure in the formation of cities and the relation of planning theories to urban culture. Case studies are used to develop effective ways of learning urban design; method and substance are equally emphasized. Concentration on the social, economic, political, technological and topographic factors that affect urban form; analysis of urban design schemata and their relation to patterns of use; and the critical appraisal of planning ideologies and strategies. Same as MIP 631.

Arch 632 - Problems and Methods in Architectural Preservation (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Theory and practice of preservation planning. Compares American and European preservation concepts, problems and techniques. Also covers theories on continuity and change in urban environments, and preservation-planning for community development and neighborhood conservation.

Arch 633 - Case Studies in Architectural Creativity (3 credits)
Prerequisite: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Considers creativity in architecture from psychological, philosophical and autobiographical perspectives. The buildings writings and lives of contemporary architects are discussed in the context of general theories of creativity. Each student chooses an individual architect noted for creative accomplishments and prepares a case study of his or her life.

Arch 634 - History of Architectural Technology (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 528G, Arch 529G. Survey of the development of building methods and materials. Impact of structural and environmental technology on architectural form and the design process. The role of technology in contemporary architectural theory and practice including the modern movement is emphasized. Recommended for students who select building science as their area of concentration.

Arch 640 - Acoustics (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core sequence or equivalent. Architectural acoustics: how we hear, physics of sound and materials, aesthetics of design and the processes of construction. Audible sounds, their interaction, perception of echo and directional hearing are applied to interior and exterior building transmission, room acoustics, and setting acceptable acoustical environments.

Arch 641 - Experiments in Structural Form (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core sequence or equivalent. Architectural form through model design, construction and testing of minimum structures, including elements of soap film study, orthogonal and diagonal grids, design of tension grids through deflection loading, photoelastic models and calculation. Also compares geometric systems, patterning and proportion, symmetry, asymmetry, relative size, nesting, linearity and spiral orders, rectilinear patterns, and randomness in architectural structure and form.

Arch 643 - Lighting (3 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 501G and Arch 502G. Through modeling and calculation, influence of the luminous environment on architectural form and detail. Perceptions of visual comfort and daylight are examined. Topics include daylighting footprints, model design and testing, and computer-assisted, light-level analysis. Relationship between daylight and artificial light in architecture, variations of light with time, analysis of seasonal and weather differences, role of task in lighting strategies, and means of control for light quantity and quality.

Arch 644 - Systems Approach to Design and Construction (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Lectures, case studies and student projects on understanding human aspirations and needs through design. Topics include land, finance, management, technology and labor.

Arch 645 - Case Studies in Architectural Technology (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Case-study method used for in-depth investigation of the relationship among various technological systems in a building and technologically-related problems in architecture and construction.

Arch 646 - Designing and Optimizing the Building Enclosure (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Considers the "building envelope," the boundary dividing the inside of a structure from the outside environment. Students study and design optimal enclosures considering energy exchange, the relationship between energy and lighting, and life cycle costs.

Arch 647 - Special Topics in Computer Applications (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Evaluation and use of computer graphics hardware and software for architectural applications. Focus is on computers as tools, operating systems and methods of data manipulation. Two- and three-dimensional modeling software are discussed, and assignments using such software are given to provide understanding of the modeling of built environments.

Arch 649 - Life Safety Issues in Contemporary Buildings (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. A variety of life safety and comfort situations are studied in different building types. Topics include building evacuation, compartmentalizing, fire fighting and suppression, evaluation and testing of new building materials and systems, systems control and management. Special attention is placed on multi-use, high-density buildings.

Arch 650 - Economy of Building (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence or equivalent. Economic consequences of design decisions. Topics include: relationship among economy, efficiency and quality; life-cycle cost of design; improving the economy of building processes and products through innovation; and environmental concerns. This course is required for the dual degree M.Arch./Master of Science in Management program. It can also be used as an elective in the M.Arch. program.

Arch 651 - Real Estate Analysis for Architects (3 credits)
Prerequisite: completion of core sequence. Introduction to the economic, financial and political aspects of real estate and their effect on architectural decision-making. Topics include: needs assessment, real estate appraisal, financial instruments, regulations and real estate, design as value-adding, and the effect of tax policies on real estate development. This course is required for the dual degree M.Arch./Master of Science in Management program. It can also be used as an elective in the M.Arch. program.

Arch 652 - Architectural Project Management (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core sequence and Arch 579G. Management of architectural projects: project costs, timing, personnel, documentation, professional ethics and resource management. This course is required for the dual degree M.Arch./Master of Science in Management program. It may be used as an elective in the M.Arch. program.

Arch 661 - Directed Studies of Architecture (3 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core and two elective courses; and approval from the graduate advisor. Independent, in-depth research on an analytical, theoretical or technical area of architecture. Student prepares formal research proposal with permission of faculty advisor and approval of graduate advisor. Required as pre-thesis research. See also course description for MARC 701.

Arch 662 - Special Topics in Architecture (3 credits)
Topics vary each semester. Refer to the School of Architecture bulletin during university registration periods for a list of current topics and possible prerequisites.

Arch 663 - Introduction to Sustainable Architecture (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environment design of buildings. The five characteristics of green buildings: sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy and atmosphere, materials and resources, and indoor environmental quality. The US Green Building Council's Green Building Rating System, review of several major buildings of exemplary design.

Arch 664 - Indoor Environmental Quality in Sustainable Design Buildings (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Supportive ambient conditions, including thermal comfort and acceptable indoor air quality, visual comfort, and appropriate acoustical quality, overall physical and psychological well-being for workplace quality, performance and productivity.

Arch 665 - Sustainable Design of Energy Efficient Buildings (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Evaluation of heating and cooling loads, impact on fuel consumption, energy software analysis for design and efficiency. Technology of passive solar design and building integrated photovoltaics.

Arch 666 - Sustainable Design with Efficient Materials and Resources (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Arch 523G. Environmentally sensitive site design; issues of wildlife habitat, erosion, ground water recharge, and threats to water quality of surface water bodies and aquifers. Water reclamation, materials and energy conservation, waste reduction and recycling.

Arch 672 - Architecture and Social Change (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Analysis of architectural form with respect to political, economic and technological change. The built environment is studied in relation to society and culture. The role of design professions in initiating or supporting change is also considered.

Arch 673 - Infrastructure Planning in Practice (3 credits)
Infrastructure planning principles, methods and tools. Through selected examples, acquaintance with infrastructure planning theories and models, quantitative methods of research and analysis, information management, decision making, and implementation techniques. Same as MIP 673.

Arch 674 - Infrastructure and Architecture (3 credits)
Examination of areas of overlap and continuity between architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, building science and infrastructure. Topics include the typology, programming and design of public facilities; the housing fabric; the relation between built form, urban space and infrastructure. Same as MIP 674.

Arch 675 - Elements of Infrastructure Planning (3 credits)
Introductory survey of the basic principles, operation and design of physical infrastructure systems including roads, public transportation, community facilities, public open space, surface drainage, and electric, gas, water, waste disposal, and telecommunications services. Same as MIP 675.

Arch 676 - The Architecture of Utopia (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Seminar looks at several ideas of utopia from literature and philosophy and how they embody transformations in the structure of space, and their architectural implications.

Arch 678 - Graduate Problems in Modern Housing (3 credits)
Prerequisite: graduate level standing. Students learn to analyze political, technical and economic aspects of contemporary housing policy and practice. Attempts to provide well-designed, affordable housing responsive to the needs of large numbers of people are examined. Examples of housing from the mid-19th century to the present day are outlined.

Arch 679 - Envisioning Newark (3 credits)
This seminar combines classroom discussion based on historical, analytical and literary texts; field visits to Newark's districts and neighborhoods; and meetings with leaders in government, business, art, education, and community-based organizations. The objective is to introduce students to the redevelopment process underway in Newark, and to use the city as a springboard for a broader investigation of the theory and practice of urban development. Effective From: Spring 2011

Arch 680 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience I (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core sequence, permission from graduate advisor and Division of Career Development Services. Students gain work experience and reinforcement of their academic programs. An architecture faculty Co-op advisor monitors and evaluates student work and project. Co-op work experiences may be acceptable equivalents for apprenticeships mandated by the New Jersey State Board of Architects and for eligibility to take the architecture licensing examination. This course is required for participation in the Housing Scholars Program. Course does not fulfill degree requirements.

Arch 681/682 - Graduate Co-op Work Experience II and III (3 additive credits)
Prerequisites: completion of core sequence, permission of graduate advisor and Division of Career Development Services. Used for extended summer-fall (681) or spring-summer (682) work experience. Does not fulfill degree requirements.

Arch 686 - Research Methods for Environmental Design (3 credits)
Introduction to methods of inquiry useful to professionals planning and designing buildings, communities and cities. Skills developed in problem definition and phenomena: measurement, modeling, testing and evaluation. Open to undergraduates with permission of instructor.

Arch 770 - Development of the American City (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Urban Systems PhD program or permission of the instructor. Introduction to research in urban history, focusing on the American city. Key texts that deal with the development of the American city will be studied in depth, with particular emphasis on the approaches, methodologies, and sources. Each student will conduct bibliographic research on a city or urban sector from a defined perspective.

Arch 771 - Pathology of Urban Systems (3 credits )
Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Urban System PhD program or permission of the instructor. Definition of pathology of urban systems as large-scale disasters that have resulted in major destruction of the urban fabric and called for radical re-planning projects. Investigation of historic case studies. The aftermath of natural and man-made disasters including war; contemporary case studies.

MARC 701 - Master's Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisites: Arch 506G, Arch 661, and approval from graduate advisor. Alternative to Arch 507G. Under the supervision of a faculty advisor, independent study of issues in the student's area of concentration developed during Arch 661.

MSAS 701 - Master of Science in Architectural Studies Thesis (6 credits)
Prerequisites: completion of required courses, electives, Arch 661 and approval from MSAS advisor. Under supervision of a thesis advisor, independent, in-depth examination of a subject in the student's area of concentration developed during Arch 661.